Researcher Impact: How we solve problems

Innovative research is at the core of our institution. It informs education, sparks inventions and propels a growing knowledge economy. UB researchers share their work, the problems they're solving and the impact it has on our changing world.

8/14/17

"We are trying to design a sustainable and environmentally friendly way of farming." Testing soil quickly to tell farmers: "This part of the field holds water for a longer time, so you can irrigate it less frequently."

11/7/17

"What’s really exciting is that we now have the ability — with the vaccine we’re developing — to watch over bacteria and attack it only if it breaks away from the colony to cause an illness. That’s important because if we leave the harmless bacteria in place, it prevents other harmful bacteria from filling that space.” From Blaine Pfeifer's lab to creating startup — Abcombi Biosciences

8/14/17

"We don't know exactly which of our current pure science investigations will lead to breakthroughs, but by pushing the boundaries of human knowledge further, we allow for possibilities in the future we can't even imagine right now."

8/14/17

"We've created an exceptionally small and extraordinarily powerful device that converts light into energy. The potential applications are exciting because it could be used to produce everything from more efficient solar panels to more powerful optical fibers."

8/14/17

"This is an entirely new idea that no one else has proposed. We think it's very likely that other animals utilized this route ... Now that we have evidence of these animals (sea otters) moving through Mexico, we can now look for evidence of other animals doing the same."

10/2/17

“Right now, the Map of Life can tell us where plants and animals are, but not why they are there,” Adam Wilson says. “What we want to do is to broaden the Map of Life to explain these patterns so that we can see how climate is influencing where different species are found.”

11/7/17

"You don't see it, but there's bacteria all over your smartphone and tablet. Most of the time, it isn't a problem. But sometimes it is. And in certain environments, it can be a huge health problem."

8/10/17

The surprising finding, “Those with less surgery got better faster in comparison with the people we did more surgery on,” prompted the journal editor to comment.

"The conclusion that unstable cartilage lesions do not need debridement could have a dramatic impact on practice management, save health care dollars, and improve early patient outcomes.”

10/2/17

“Buffalo is a good example that embodies various aspects of architecture,” she says. “Architecture can be a treasure or a burden to a city. A building is a big expensive thing, not only to build, but also to maintain. It’s not just a place for people to live and work; it also reflects the society and people’s lives.”

8/14/17

"Handwashing prevents leading causes of the 6 million deaths that occur annually in young children around the world. Never before has handwashing been systematically measured in so many countries. These data are useful to public health programs and policymakers."

8/14/17

"Most users fail to obtain even a fraction of the theoretical speeds promised by existing networks. The bandwidth is there. We just need new tools to take advantage of it."

10/2/17

“We wanted to see if we could use a low-cost, remote-sensing method that doesn’t require ground monitoring to understand how our aquifers are responding to a changing climate and human activity.”

8/14/17

"By advancing our understanding of how this treatment can impact oral health, we can better work to improve the bone health and quality of life of female patients."

8/14/17

"Hackers are out there, more than you can imagine. ... Technology is advancing so fast; we have to think of different ways. The strategy is using multiple lines of defense. We call that defense in depth."

11/7/17

"This (Middle East and Turkey) is where humans first settled when they left Africa. It may be where they first met Neanderthals. From the standpoint of genetics, it's a very interesting region."

8/10/17

"These results show that it's possible that high-intensity interval training can help enhance quality of life and capacity to be healthy." With short vigorous periods of exercise, "you get more bang for your buck."

10/2/17

“No two people with identical hearts have ever been found,” Xu says, and while heart-based biometrics systems have been used for almost a decade,“no one has done a non-contact remote device to characterize our hearts’ geometry traits for identification.”

8/14/17

"We didn't plan on setting a record, but it's certainly a nice recognition of our work. I think this helps show the enormous potential that graphene aerogel has in our daily lives."

10/2/17

“Reprograming these exosomes may disarm the dangerous package that they carry, ... This will lay the foundation for the development of novel drug carriers ...  More specifically, these new carriers have the potential to prevent metastasis in cancer patients.”

11/7/17

"The CAP PC (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for Primary Care) program represents a lifetime of working toward the integration of physical and mental health, which has been in my heart from the beginning of medical school."

10/2/17

“The findings from this study add a fascinating new tool to our understanding and utilization of stem cell biology for regenerative medicine.”

8/10/17

“Showing graphic content and providing a more accurate and complete representation of severe events can motivate people to care more about what they’re seeing. ... We see increases in moral sensitivity and a greater desire for humanitarian and military interventions designed to stop violence ... ”

8/14/17

"We monitor coral reef health, the effects of pollution on marine life, and document and try to prevent damage that is done by invasive species."