Indigenous Inclusion Events

On this page:

Fall 2022 Events

Haudenosaunee Social Dances & Dinner

Date & Time: Thursday, December 1, 5:00pm-7:00pm

Location: Student Union (Flag Room, 215), North Campus

Intended Audience: Open Event 

The Department of Indigenous Studies will be having a dinner and social event to celebrate the end of the semester, connect and join a common space in the Student Union. 

For any questions, please email: indigenous-studies@buffalo.edu.  

Sponsored by the UB's department of Indigenous Studies.

Learning Haudenosaunee Social Dances

Date & Time: Wednesday, November 30, 5:00pm-7:00pm

Location: Harriman Hall, South Campus

Intended Audience: Open Event 

Join the Department of Indigenous Studies in this celebration where they will host a Social Dancing class to learn about all the different Haudenosaunee social dances. 

For any questions, please email: indigenous-studies@buffalo.edu

Sponsored by the UB's department of Indigenous Studies.

Warrior Lawyers

Date & Time: Friday, November 11, 5:00pm-8:00pm 

Location: UB Law Library (2nd Floor), North Campus

Intended Audience: Open Event 

We are sharing an event where there will be a showing of the documentary: Warrior Lawyers | Defenders of Sacred Justice, with a special introduction from Honorable Mark Montour. Mark Montour is St. Regis Mohawk/Kanien‘kehá:ka and a UB Alumnus, ’83, for being the first Onkwehón:we (Native person) appointed to serve as a New York State Appellate Judge.

For questions, please contact: Native Indigenous Law Student Association at law-nilsa@buffalo.edu

Sponsored by the UB’s Native Indigenous Law Student Association, UB Law Library and UB School of Law, with support from UB’s department of Indigenous Studies. 

Denying Access: A film in recognition of Native American Heritage Month

Date & Time: Wednesday, November 9, 4:30pm

Location: Silverman Library (305), North Campus 

Intended Audience: Open Event 

Denying Access: NoDAPL to NoNAPL is the story of the Senecas who went to Standing Rock in 2016 to oppose the Dakota Access and Northern Access Pipelines. This Indigenous-led movement brought together people from around the world in an unprecedented call for the recognition of Indigenous rights and an end to a destructive fossil fuel industry. Filmmaker Jason Corwin (Seneca Nation, Deer Clan) is clinical assistant professor in the Dept. of Indigenous Studies at UB. He is a lifelong photographer, videographer, and independent media producer, working especially on Indigenous rights and environmental issues.

For more information, please visit the following UB Libraries page

Sponsored by the University at Buffalo Libraries.

Native American Student Outreach Day

Date & Time: Friday, November 4, 9:00am-1:00pm

Location: Landmark Room - Student Union (210), North Campus 

Intended Audience: Open Event (designed for Native American high school students) 

UB’s Department of Indigenous Studies invites Native American high school students to join them on campus for Native American Student Outreach Day. If transportation is an issue please let them know so they can coordinate with the schedule. 

Please email Aaron VanEvery (Six Nations, Cayuga, Wolf Clan) at indigenous-studies@buffalo.edu or call (716) 645-7917 with any questions or concerns.

Sponsored by the Department of Indigenous Studies. 

Indigenize UB's Campus this November

Date & Time: Tuesday, November 1, 2022 - Wednesday, November 30, 2022

Location: North Campus (locations below)

Intended Audience: Open Event 

For November, the undergraduate student groups are hosting a month long event to promote indigenous identify on campus. Please join First Nations Student Associate (FNSA) and UB’s Chapter of American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) in Indigenizing UB’s campus this Native American Heritage Month.

  • Week 1 – Nov 1-5 – Rep your Nation/Tribe Week
    • Wear clothing that represents your nation or tribe on campus
    • Group Photo in the Indigenous Student Center (510 Clemens) on Thursday Nov 3 at 12pm
  • Week 2 – Nov 6-12 – Ribbon Shirts and Ribbon Skirts Week
    • Wear Ribbon Skirts and Ribbon Shirts to campus
    • Group Photo in the Indigenous Student Center (510 Clemens) on Wednesday Nov 9 at 1pm
  • Week 3 – Nov 13-19 – National Rock Your Mocs Week
    • Wear your moccasins to campus. Consider using hashtag #ROCKYOURMOCS and #ubindigenous in your social media posts
    • Group Photo in the Indigenous Student Center (510 Clemens) on Tuesday Nov 15 at 1pm
  • Week 4 – Nov 20-26 – MMIWG2S Awareness Week
    • Wear Red to campus to promote awareness, advocacy and remember our Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit People (MMIWG2S)
    • Group Photo in the Indigenous Student Center (510 Clemens) on Monday Nov 21 at 11am
  • Week 5 – Nov 27-30 – FNSA/AISES Week
    • Wear FNSA and AISES Shirts to campus
    • Group Photo in the Indigenous Student Center (510 Clemens) on Wednesday Nov 30 at 3pm

Please email the department of Indigenous Studies at indigenous-studies@buffalo.edu with any questions or concerns.

Sponsored by First Nation Student Association, UB AISES, and the Department of Indigenous Studies.

THE MUSH HOLE

Date & Time: Friday, October 21, 7pm

Location: Center for the Arts (103), North Campus

Intended Audience: Open Event 

The UB Indigenous Studies Department invites you for a performance of THE MUSH HOLE presented by Santee Smith and Kaha:wi Dance Theatre. The heart-breaking performance moves through North America’s residential school history with hope and empathy. Tickets are required and available at this ticket link

Please email indigenous-studies@buffalo.edu with any questions. 

Sponsored by the UB Indigenous Studies Department and the Office of Inclusive Excellence 

Indigenous Powwow Bootcamp

Date & Time: Thursday, October 20, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Location: Center for the Arts (B83), North Campus

Intended Audience: Open Event (No registration required)

Kaha:wi Dance Theatre’s (KDT) high-energy Powwow/dance training class is a fun boot camp style workout for people interested in maximizing their physical fitness led by Artistic Director Santee Smith and select KDT instructors. KDT’s Powwow Boot Camp allows participants to learn or practice skills in Indigenous dance forms of Powwow and Onkwehon:we (Haudenosaunee) social dances. These dances are performed in combination with exciting and challenging cardiovascular/physical conditioning exercises and contemporary dance.

Please email indigenous-studies@buffalo.edu with any questions. 

Sponsored by the UB Indigenous Studies Department 

O’nigöëi:yo:h Thinking in Indian Exhibition

Date & Time: July 14 – October 2, 2022

Intended Audience: Open Event 

Locations: Anderson Gallery and Center For the Arts Gallery

O’nigöëi:yo:h Thinking in Indian is an exhibition of Hodinöhsö:ni’ artists celebrating 2022 as the 50th year of Indigenous Studies at the University at Buffalo. It looks back and forward to the seeding of intellectual traditions, seizing of territorial imaginings through meaningful actions, and the threading of grounded relationality as we come together with a good mind. Works by almost 50 artists from the Hodinöhsö:ni’ Confederacy – Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora–will be featured across both UB Art Galleries spaces (Center for the Arts and UB Anderson Gallery). Click here for more information about the exhibition.

Sponsored by: Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UB Department of Indigenous Studies, UB College of Arts and Sciences, the Visual Arts Building Fund, the UB Anderson Gallery Fund, and the Seymour H. Knox Foundation Fine Art Fund

Dashe:yöh odä'swi:yo:h: Celebration of the new Department of Indigenous Studies at UB

Date & Time: Wednesday, September 29, 11:00am-1:30pm

Location: 403 Hayes Hall, South Campus

Intended Audience: Open Event

Come learn about the new Department of Indigenous Studies, and how you can better support Indigenous Students at UB by learning about some of the unique barriers they may encounter during their time here. Traditional Hodinöhsö:ni’ lunch will be provided after the presentation. Click here to register.

Sponsored by the UB Professional Staff Senate, PSS Inclusion and Diversity Committee, and UB Indigenous Studies. 

Native Youth Social

Date & Time: Thursday, August 11, 5:30-8:00pm (Student Union, 215 “Flag Room”) 

Intended Audience: Open Event

Join the Department of Indigenous Studies, the Native American Community Services of Erie & Niagara Counties (NACS) and the Roswell’s Center for Indigenous Cancer Research in celebrating with a fun social event in the Student Union (SU) here at UB! There will be opportunities to listen and dance to Haudenosaunee songs and there will be food served in the Flag Room (SU 215), the closest parking area is in the Furnas Lot.

Sponsored by Native American Community Services of Erie & Niagara Counties, Inc. (NACS), the UB Department of Indigenous Studies, and Roswell Park's Center for Indigenous Cancer Research

Strengthening Our Resilience

Native American Community Services (NACS) is happy to announce some upcoming training opportunities for Native American Cultural Competency.  There are two virtual sessions for the “Introduction” sessions, and they will also have two in-person sessions for the four-hour, “Overview” trainings.  Please see the to register and additional details.

1. Introduction to Native American Cultural Competency

Date & Time: August 29, 2022, 12:00-1:00pm and September 13, 2022, 12:00-1:00pm (Virtual, see below for more details)

Intended Audience: Open Event

These one-hour sessions provide brief overviews of Native cultures, health challenges facing many communities, historical traumas, how to engage with Native American peoples more respectfully, and efforts to restore community wellbeing.

Monday, August 29, 2022, 12:00-1:00pm, Virtual on Zoom

https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwrd-6uqzwoG9f75cuWRdAUnHGkzCsyZINZ

Tuesday, September 13, 2022, 12:00-1:00pm, Virtual on Zoom

https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwpdOyqpzosEt17GuQD--NjRx4PpkYQ2p40

2. Overview of Native American Cultural Competency

Date & Time: August 25, 11:00am-4:00pm and September 16, 2022, 10:00am–3:00pm (In-Person, see below for more details) 

Intended Audience: Open Event

These four-hour sessions include deeper discussions of traditional Native cultures, Trauma-Informed Care, Historical Traumas, a screening and discussion of “Unseen Tears: The Impact of Residential Boarding Schools,” strategies to move ahead, and more. Both “Overview” sessions are very similar in content. The “Overview” sessions will include a one-hour lunch break and will be held IN PERSON at the location identified below:

Thursday, August 25,  11:00am-4:00pm, IN PERSON: At Indigenous Attractions, 1626 Military Rd, Niagara Falls, NY 14304

Friday, September 16, 2022, 10:00am–3:00pm, IN PERSON: At NACS, 1005 Grant St., Buffalo NY 14207

To register for either of these IN-PERSON “Overview” trainings, please email Pete Hill at phill@nacswny.org for registration info.

Sponsored by Native American Community Services of Erie & Niagara Counties, Inc. (NACS) and the New York State Office of Addiction Services & Supports (OASAS)

Spring 2022 Events

DSSN Symposium: Indigenous Data Sovereignty and Digital Archives

Date & Time: Tuesday, May 10, 2022, 1:00pm-4:00pm (In-person and Online)

Location: Baldy Center, 509 O’Brian Hall, North Campus and Zoom

Intended Audience: Open Event

This symposium will bring together Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars with an interest in social and technical systems for managing access to digital materials documenting Indigenous cultural and linguistic practices. A key concern to be addressed will be how to ensure that Indigenous communities are able to maintain sovereignty over materials documenting their heritage in light of conflicts between Western notions of intellectual property and diverse Indigenous traditions.

This symposium is expected to be of interest to scholars with an interest in Indigenous Studies, Law, Information Science, Anthropology, and Linguistics, as well as others involved with exploring the long-ranging historical impacts of colonialism, as is typical of much research in the humanities. It will also be of value for people engaged in the maintenance of the intellectual traditions of Indigenous communities, including members of the university community, such as librarians and archivists, who may be called upon to develop protocols and platforms that facilitate the safekeeping of Indigenous data in ways which allow Indigenous communities to maintain sovereignty over materials documenting their cultural, intellectual, and linguistic heritage. To register and for more information, click here.

Presented by the The Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy and the Department of Indigenous Studies.

Economic Enemies? The Conflict Between the Seneca Nation and New York State Over Gaming

Date & Time: Wednesday, May 4, 2022, 4:10pm-5:30pm (Online)

Location: Zoom

Intended Audience: Open Event

For several years the Seneca Nation has maintained that their gaming compact extension makes no provisions for revenue sharing with New York State. Senecas have argued that economic racism and greed are the motivating factors for unfavorable court rulings and Governor Hochul’s recent action freezing all Seneca Nation bank accounts to force payment of the disputed funds. A grassroots mobilization, known as the Mothers of the Seneca Nation, has challenged the legality of this payment and spoken out forcefully on the issue. Join founding members Leslie Logan and Odie Brant Porter for a discussion about the past, present, and future of Seneca casino gaming, its economic impacts on Western New York, and the long-standing challenges dealing with the state government. Click here to register for the online event.

Presented by the Department of Indigenous Studies

50 Years of Indigenous Studies at UB w/Rick Hill: Who Stole Native American Studies?

Date & Time: Wednesday, April 27, 2022, 4:10pm-5:40pm (Online)

Location: Zoom

Intended Audience: Open Event

Join Rick Hill for a short walk down memory lane, exploring what made Native American Studies at UB exciting in the 1970’s-1980’s. He will then relate the ideas in Lakota scholar Elizabeth Cook-Lynn’s essay of the same name to look at the future of the discipline.
Click here to register for the online event.

Presented by the Department of Indigenous Studies

Haudenosaunee Visuality as a Tradition

Date & Time: Wednesday, April 20, 2022, 4:10pm-5:40pm (Online)

Location: Zoom

Intended Audience: Open Event

Join Dr. Jolene Rickard for a lecture about the project of injecting Indigenous philosophy in the academy and translating these ideas into a methodology that is happening in multiple locations. As often the case, Indigenous artists are leading the way with their work. This talk will consider how reading the visual legacies of Haudenosaunee material culture is essential in disrupting the aestheticized violence of our dispossession and ongoing relationships to our homelands. Click here to register for the online event.

Presented by the Department of Indigenous Studies

Leveraging the Academy to Help Strengthen the House

Date & Time: Wednesday, April 13th, 4:10pm - 5:40pm (Click here to register for this online event) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students  

Join Haudenosaunee Historian, Susan M. Hill (Mohawk Nation, Wolf Clan) for a lecture identifying the people, methods, and interventions that helped to make Indigenous Studies at UB a reality. From her time as a graduate student at the University at Buffalo to serving as the Director of the Centre for Indigenous Studies at the University of Toronto, Dr. Hill offers varied and in-depth perspectives on the history, people, and community-building methods the ensured the longevity of Critical Indigenous Studies within Haudenosaunee homelands. Click here to register for this online event, and you can also click here to visit the New Indigenous Studies Website.

Sponsored by the Department of Indigenous Studies

50 Years of Indigenous Studies at UB with Dr. Kevin White: Scholarly Activism and White Corn

Date & Time: Wednesday, March 30, 4:10pm-5:40pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students  

In this presentation, Kevin White will talk about his years as a graduate student in the American Studies Program at the University of Buffalo. He will reflect on his time learning about what it meant to be an Indigenous community-centered scholar- activist and his engagement with the White Corn project. He will share his insights on the UB American Studies program as a space of research, food, and a venue of learning unlike anywhere else.

Sponsored by the Department of Indigenous Studies

Mapping Anishinaabe Kendaaswin: Land, Truth, and Treaties through Oral History By Joshua Manitowabi

Date & Time: Tuesday, March 29, 1:00pm (640 Clemens Hall, North Campus or Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students  

Please join us for a research talk by Joshua Manitowabi (Potawatomi), Ph.D. Candidate in Humanities at Brock University, who will envision how decolonial mapping can portray treaty relations with the land, water and sky through the Dish With One Spoon Wampum treaty. He will also demonstrate through storytelling how Anishinaabe occupancy of Odawa Mnis is ongoing. Interactive mapping will be examined for its potential to address the limitations of static mapping in presenting an accurate Anishinaabe perspective. He will examine mapping strategies that incorporate traditional ways of imparting knowledge, such as storytelling and oral history. From the user’s perspective, this type of modern technology for constructing digital maps can offer alternative perspectives of Indigenous cultural representations while simultaneously providing new insights within contested areas of space between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.

Sponsored by the Department of Indigenous Studies

Knowing John Mohawk is to “keep it all going”: Lessons in Consciousness and Persistence

Date & Time: Wednesday March 16, 4:10pm-5:40pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students  

Join preeminent lifecycle advocate Katsi Tekatsi:tsia'kwa Cook (Mohawk Nation, Wolf Clan) as she reflects on fellow Haudenosaunee thinker, John Mohawk as situated through her lens. 

Link to register: https://buffalo.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0uceqrpjgsGtdjYu40_aSH3YnOYsdkRUTa

Sponsored by the School of Social Work 

Residential Schools: Intergenerational Impact of Unresolved Historical Trauma on Survivors -- Healing and Decolonization for Future Generations

Date & Time: Monday, March 14, 12:30pm-1:30pm (684 Baldy, North Campus or Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students  

Join us for a presentation by Dawn C. Hill, MSW, RSW, UBSSW alumna, and a clinical social worker with the Six Nations Family Health Team. Dawn will discuss how descendants of residential school survivors can use writing and land-based practices as tools for healing from trauma. She will share excerpts from her 2021 memoir Memory Keeper. Click here to register. 

Sponsored by the School of Social Work 

Digital Caretakers: Transformation Storytelling from an Indigenous Lens

Date & Time: Monday, March 7, 12:30pm-1:30pm (684 Baldy, North Campus or Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students  

Join us to hear Amanda Royce Josanaraae Cheromiah, Ph.D., Director of Native SOAR in the College of Education at the University of Arizona, present: Digital Caretakers: Transformation Storytelling from an Indigenous Lens. Before the record of time, Indigenous communities have shared stories on the land we occupy now. Rooted in Indigenous storytelling methodologies, this event will help you learn strategies to center storytelling in your work as a powerful medium to connect with students and communities. The event is a feature of the Global to Local Speaker Series and the Symposium on Voices for Healing and Justice. 

Sponsored by the School of Social Work 

Significant Convergence: UB and Native Activism, in Appreciation of Great Teachers Who Inspired and Guided the Work of Generations, Focus on John Mohawk

Date & Time: Wednesday, March 2, 2022, 4:10pm-5:40pm (Online)

Intended Audience: Open Event

Join Taíno activist, author, scholar and organizer José Barreiro Hatueyael for an engaging lecture on the history and everlasting impacts of Indigenous activism and scholarship at UB, with a focus on John Mohawk.

Link to register:  https://buffalo.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ghxce7_MS-KrOZZ5mrBegQ

Presented by the Department of Indigenous Studies

Indigenous Intellectual Property and Data Sovereignty

Date & Time: Friday, February 18, 12:00pm-3:00pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students  

Presenting Dr. Desi Small-Rodriguez: "Indigenous Data Sovereignty: An Overview From Pre-Invasion To Today" and Dr. Stephanie Russo Carroll: "Sovereignty and Governance for Indigenous Data Futures." These presentations will explore the intersections between copyright law, intellectual property, data sovereignty, digital governance, and Indigenous knowledge. Click here to register. 

Sponsored by the Department of Indigenous Studies 

50 Years of Indigenous Studies at UB Speaker Series with Guest Speaker Oren Lyons

Date & Time: Wednesday, February 16, 4:10pm-5:40pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students  

Dr. Oren Lyons is a Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan and a member of the Onondaga Nation Council of Chiefs of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. He is also a founding member of the Native American Studies program at the University at Buffalo. Join us for this special event, with introductory remarks by UB President Satish K. Tripathi, in honor of the 50th anniversary of Native American Studies at UB, as Dr. Lyons shares his work in building this monumental program, as well as the various local, national, and international projects he was a part of during this time. Click here to register. 

Sponsored by the Department of Indigenous Studies and the Office of Inclusive Excellence

50 Years of Indigenous Studies at UB Speaker Series with Guest Speaker Agnes Williams

Date & Time: Wednesday, February 9, 4:10pm-5:40pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students  

As part of the Department of Indigenous Studies 50 years of Indigenous Studies at UB Speaker Series, Agnes Williams will speak on February 9. Join Founding Mother of the Indigenous Women’s Network, Agnes Williams (Seneca Nation, Wolf Clan) for an engaging lecture on the history and contributions of Native American Studies at UB. From protests to the classroom, learn about action-based scholarship as a foundational element in the establishment of Indigenous Studies and the role it plays in local, regional, state, federal and international arenas. Click here to register. 

Sponsored by the Department of Indigenous Studies 

Fall 2021 Events

Upcoming Native American/American Indian Heritage Month Events

Date & Time: For a detailed schedule, visit the Intercultural and Diversity Center events webpage

Intended Audience: UB Students    

UB's Intercultural and Diversity Center (IDC) serves dual purposes. It provides a welcoming space for students, and coordinates educational programs and cultural events aimed to broaden student perspectives and promote inclusion, equity, and social justice. Visit the Intercultural and Diversity Center events webpage for details on the upcoming Native American events as well as other indivdual events. 

Sponsored by the Intercultural and Diversity Center (IDC)

Hiking at Letchworth State Park

Date & Time: Saturday, November 6, 9:00am

Location: Meet at UB for carpool 

Intended Audience: Open Event 

Join students from First Nations SA and AISES for hiking and a picnic at Letchworth State Park .

Hosted by First Nations SA and AISES

Doctrine of Discovery: Film Screening & Discussion

Date & Time: Monday, November 8, 5:00-7:00pm

Location: 190 Pharmacy Building (South Campus) or via livestream using this link

Intended Audience: Open Event 

Join us in-person or virtually for the screening of Doctrine of Discovery. This powerful documentary describes the principle of domination that has been used to oppress Indigenous peoples in the Americas, how the residual impacts of historical traumas can last for centuries into the present day, and how the traditional teachings of original nations and peoples form an alternative to this dehumanizing system. In addition to the screening, UB alumnus Pete Hill will facilitate a conversation about historical trauma and the longstanding effects of violence against Indigenous peoples, and will also debrief the film. Click here to register.

Food and refreshments will be provided beginning at 4:45pm in the cafe just down the hall from the screening room.

Filmmaker Terry Jones

Date & Time: Tuesday, November 9, 4:00-5:30pm  

Location: 112 O'Brian Hall

Intended Audience: Open Event 

Please join us for a presentation and discussion with filmmaker Terry Jones. He is a member of the Seneca Nation of Indians and currently resides in Newtown on the Cattaraugus territory. Terry has a passion for sharing his Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) history and culture through his film works. He strives to find a balance between entertaining and educating his audiences. Click here to learn more. 

Sponsored by the Department of Indigenous Studies 

Giving Thanks for the Natural World – Onödowa’ga:’ Environmentalism

Date & Time: Wednesday, November 17, 4:00pm  

Location: Online 

Intended Audience: Open Event 

Join Dr. Jason Corwin (Seneca Nation, Deer Clan) for a multimedia look at Onödowa’ga:’ (Seneca) initiatives to protect land and water while promoting sustainability grounded in Indigenous philosophies. Dr. Jason Corwin, Clinical Assistant Professor of Indigenous Studies at UB, is a citizen of the Seneca Nation (Deer Clan), and a lifelong media maker. He was the founding director of the Seneca Media & Communications Center and has produced several short and feature length documentaries. Jason has extensive experience as a community-based environmental educator utilizing digital media to engage with Indigenous ways of knowing, sustainability, and social/environmental justice topics. Click here for news and events .

Sponsored by the Department of Indigenous Studies 

Introduction to Native American Cultural Competency

Date & Time: Monday, October 11, 12:00-1:00pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: Open Event 

This two-session series begins on October 11 (Indigenous Peoples Day) by offering an overview of major Native and Haudenosaunee cultural concepts, discussing challenges to Native health and well-being, and sharing recent and emerging efforts to support community wellness. 

Presented by the Office of Inclusive Excellence in partnership with Native American Community Services

Spring 2021 Events

Rest and Refuge with Rosy Simas (Seneca, Heron clan)

Date & Time: Tuesday, April 20, 9:00-10:30am (Online) 

Intended Audience: Open Event 

Based on Rosy’s creative practice, this workshop is intended to create space for refuge and rest – for the body, the heart, the mind, and spirit. We will move, breathe, hear, see, and practice deep listening to ourselves and our environment. Click here to register. 

Cosponsored by the Humanities Institute Performance Research Workshop, the Department of Theatre and Dance, and the Humanities Institute Haudenosaunee-Native American Studies Workshop

Land, Race, and Indigeneity: Building Solidarity Practices

Date & Time: Tuesday, April 13, 12:00–1:00pm (click here to register)

Intended Audience: Open Event

This conversation between Mishuana Goeman and Theresa McCarthy will delve the racialization of Indigenous peoples in North America and its effect on individuals and communities. These ways of “seeing race” and implementing them in settler policies have had profound effects on understanding American Indians as political entities. By unpacking some of the history and they ways that race has shifted and changed over time, Prof. Goeman and McCarthy hope to posit new ways forward for solidarity practices. In order to “ground” this conversation, we will discuss Indigenous art pieces that posit new ways to interpret the history of racializing Indigenous peoples.

Presented by the Office of Inclusive Excellence

Conversation Series on Hodinöhsö:ni’ Geographies: Indigenous Land-Based Protocols and Commemoration at UB

Date & Time: Tuesday, March 2, 4:00pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students 

Featuring: Agnes Williams (Seneca, Wolf Clan), Lori Quigley (Seneca, Wolf Clan), Marilyn Schindler (Seneca, Snipe Clan), Christine Abrams (Seneca, Beaver Clan)

Within Hodinöhsö:ni’ worldview, women are responsible for all matters regarding the land. Honoring this, our second installment of our Hodinöhsö:ni’ Geographies Series is designed as a listening session led by a panel of Seneca women of this territory. This listening session will provide a space where we can listen and receive direction on how best to develop our land acknowledgement protocols and other forms of Hodinöhsö:ni’ land-based commemoration on our campus. Click here for more information and to register. 

Sponsored by the Center for Diversity Innovation, the Humanities Institute, and the College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Andrew Jolivétte, Indigenous Solidarity with Black Lives Matter: A Panel Discussion

Date & Time: Thursday, February 25, 4:00-5:30pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students 

Featuring Dr Jolivétte, this panel will explore the significance of Indigenous peoples’ solidarity and collaboration with the Black Lives Matter movement. It will include a comparative discussion of the impact of state violence on Black and Indigenous histories and current realities, the convergences between Black liberation and Indigenous sovereignty, and the importance of our collective work on dismantling systems of white supremacy. Click here for more information and to register. 

Sponsored by the forthcoming Department of Indigenous Studies and the Center for Diversity Innovation Distinguished Visiting Scholars Program

Digital Possibilities & Collaboration with First Peoples

Date & Time: Monday, February 22, 1:00-2:30pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students 

Co-Director of two digital projects working in collaboration with Indigenous communities, Mishuana Goeman will address best practices and the primary tools involved in the projects. Mapping Indigenous LA  aims to uncover the multiple layers of Indigenous Los Angeles through storymapping with Tribal Nations, Indigenous youth, community leaders, and elders from Indigenous communities throughout the city of Los Angeles to tell the multi-layered stories of placemaking. Click here for more information and to register.

Sponsored by DSSN and Co-sponsored by Geography, Linguistics, GGS, A/AS, ISD, CDI

Fall 2020 Events

Electric Lights, Tourist Sights: Gendering Dispossession and Settler Colonial Infrastructure at Niagara Falls

Date & Time: Thursday December 3, 4:00pm (Online) 

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff, and Students 

Niagara Falls has become an important monument marking the boundary of the United States northern border and Canada’s Southern border. For Seneca people however, the falls are the place where the Thunder Beings reside and thus it is a place instrumental to Seneca experience of place. Built up as a tourist site in the early 1900s and later marketed as a honeymoon site, Niagara Falls becomes an important geographical area to extend the work of Mishuana Goeman, a 2020-2021 UB Center for Diversity Innovation Distinguished Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor of Gender Studies, American Indian Studies, and affiliated faculty of Critical Race Studies in the Law School, UCLA. Goeman's work in examining state produced space (such as making of monuments and jurisdictions) and Indigenous place-making (such as the reflection of experiences through intergenerational stories regarding specific sites, that in turn produce a value system).

Sponsored by The Center for Diversity Innovation and the Gender Institute

A Book Presentation and Conversation with Brianna Theobald

Date & Time: Wednesday, November 18, 4:00pm (Online)

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff and Students

Dr Brianna Theobald discussed Native women’s reproductive histories and their activism from her new, multi award-winning book Reproduction on the Reservation: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Colonialism in the Long Twentieth Century. Dr Theobald is an assistant professor of history at the University of Rochester. She is the recipient of the John C. Ewers Award from the Western History Association and the Armitage-Jameson Prize from the Coalition for Western Women’s History. Dr. Theobald has also recently published several important public-facing pieces on such topics as the history of eugenics in the United States, detained migrants and reproductive abuse, and the history making work of Native American nurses.

Sponsored by the UB Humanities Institute – Haudenosaunee Native American Research Group, the UB Gender Institute, and the forthcoming UB Indigenous Studies Department

"Indians" in the Archives: Mobilizing Native Voices within Settler Colonial Structures for Indigenous Sovereignty

Date & Time: Friday, November 13, 3:00pm (Online)

Intended Audience: UB Faculty, Staff and Students

Drawing on two decades of work in archives and special collections, as a student and researcher, faculty instructor, and program director, Dr. Alyssa Mt. Pleasant discussed opportunities and challenges for a range of approaches to capacity building in support of Indigenous sovereignty that engage rare book and manuscript collections held by a range of institutions.

Presented by UB Humanities Institute Sovereignty Research Laboratory

A Conversation on Hodinöhsö:ni′ Geographies: Unsettling the Settler State

Date & Time: Thursday, October 1, 4:00-5:15pm 

Intended Audience: Open Event   

This first of three conversations revolved around a place-based discussion on meaningful acknowledgements in Hodinöhsö:ni′ traditional territories. How might we use land introductions to follow through with a responsibility and commitment to nurturing healthy communities? How is the research and teaching in land grant institutions often in tension with Hodinöhsö:ni′ concepts of land and sovereignty? What process and protocols should be undertaken to engage respectfully, responsibly and with care? Most of all, how might an understanding of Hodinöhsö:ni′ geographies and anti-colonial practices create possibilities for future generations and relationships?

Presented by The UB Center for Diversity and Innovation, UB Humanities Institute, the College of Arts and Sciences at UB, and the Office of Inclusive Excellence

Past Events

Fall 2019 Events

Spring 2019 Events

Fall 2018 Events

Native American Welcome

The Eagle and The Condor: From Standing Rock With Love