UB CDI Distinguished Visiting Scholar

Mishuana Goeman

Mishuana Goeman, Ph.D.

Mishuana Goeman, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Gender Studies, American Indian Studies, and affiliated faculty of Critical Race Studies in the Law School, UCLA

  • PhD, Modern Thought and Literature, Stanford University
  • MA, Modern Thought and Literature, Stanford University, 
  • BA, English Literature and Native American Studies, Dartmouth College

Notable Awards

  • Institute of American Cultures Research Award for “Carrying Our Ancestors Home (COAH): Digital education project on NAGPRA and repatriation,” UCLA
  • Research Excellence Award, Dean of Social Science and Center for the Study of Women, UCLA
  • UC Humanities Research Institute Engaging Humanities for Mapping Indigenous LA
  • Distinguished Alumni Award, Stanford University
  • UC Presidential Postdoctoral Award

Dr. Mishuana Goeman, Tonawanda Band of Seneca, is an Associate Professor of Gender Studies, Chair of American Indian Studies, and affiliated faculty of Critical Race Studies in the Law School at UCLA. She is also the inaugural Special Advisor to the UCLA Chancellor on Native American and Indigenous Affairs. Goeman is the author of Mark My Words: Native Women Mapping Our Nations (University of Minnesota Press, 2013) and the forthcoming Settler Aesthetics and the Spectacle of Originary Moments: Terrence Malick’s the New World, in progress with the Indigenous Film Series, Eds. Randolph Lewis and David Shorter at University of Nebraska Press. She is a Co-PI on two community based digital projects, Mapping Indigenous L.A (2015), which gathers alternative maps of resiliency from Indigenous LA communities, and Carrying Our Ancestors Home (2019), a site concentrating on better working tribal relationships and communications as it concerns repatriation and NAGPRA.

Areas of Interest/Special Expertise

Studying settler-colonialism, geography and literature in ways that generate anti-colonial tools in the struggle for social justice; an Indigenous approach considering ways colonial violence is gendered; digital humanities; mentoring Haudenosaunee students and those interested in Indigenous and/or Gender Studies; collaborative politics.