Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and Stalking

UB is committed to ensuring that all members of our community can work and learn in a safe environment.  UB provides support, assistance and redress for victims of stalking, sexual assault, sexual violence, dating violence and domestic violence.

10/9/17

You have several options for support, redress and assistance. Whether or not you wish to pursue a criminal report or charges, EDI can assist with measures to ensure you are supported.

12/2/14

If you have experienced sexual harassment or a sexual assault, you may or may not feel comfortable with moving forward with an investigation. UB has options that allow you to get support while still controlling how much information is shared and with whom.

6/12/15

UB upholds the rights of victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking to have their concerns addressed effectively.

6/12/15

Describes reporting rights and options, resources for support, protection and accommodations, and the rights of the parties to the student conduct process.

6/21/17
As a faculty or staff member, you may learn from a student that he or she has been the victim of a sexual assault.  The Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion can help to guide you in providing the right support and assistance. 
8/7/17

UB wants to provide clarity about how the campus addresses sexual assault.

9/29/17
In the fall of 2016, the University at Buffalo was one of five State University of New York schools to pilot the SUNY Campus Climate Survey.  All UB students, faculty and staff were invited to provide information to advise and inform our campus sexual assault prevention and response efforts.

Definitions

  • Stalking is the unwanted, repeated pursuit of one individual by another.   
  • Sexual violence refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to the victim’s use of drugs or alcohol. An individual also may be unable to give consent due to an intellectual or other disability. A number of different acts fall into the category of sexual violence, including rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion. All such acts of sexual violence are forms of sexual harassment covered under Title IX.
  • Sexual assault is any sexual act committed against a person without their consent. Consent is a voluntary, verbal agreement between equal and unimpaired partners, without coercion.
  • Domestic violence is a pattern of coercive tactics which can include physical, psychological, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse perpetrated by one person against an adult intimate partner, with the goal of establishing and maintaining power and control over the victim.  
  • Affirmative consent is a knowing, voluntary, and mutual decision among all participants to engage in sexual activity.  Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions create clear permission regarding willingness to engage in the sexual activity. Silence or lack of resistance, in and of itself, does not demonstrate consent. The definition of consent does not vary based upon a participant's sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.
    • Consent to any sexual act or prior consensual sexual activity between or with any party does not necessarily constitute consent to any other sexual act.
    • Consent is required regardless of whether the person initiating the act is under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol.
    • Consent may be initially given but withdrawn at any time.
    • Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated, which occurs when an individual lacks the ability to knowingly choose to participate in sexual activity. Incapacitation may be caused by the lack of consciousness or being asleep, being involuntarily restrained, or if an individual otherwise cannot consent.  Depending on the degree of intoxication, someone who is under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or other intoxicants may be incapacitated and therefore unable to consent.
    • Consent cannot be given when it is the result of any coercion, intimidation, force, or threat of harm.
    • When consent is withdrawn or can no longer be given, sexual activity must stop.