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Official UB news and information for the media
12/1/10

Sargur Srihari, director of UB's Center of Excellence in Document Analysis and Recognition, wrote an article in IEEE Spectrum magazine about his participation in the National Academy of Sciences' report on science and forensics.

12/1/10

An article in the Wall Street Journal about England's Prince William marrying a non-royal, and how in the U.S. class distinctions are more blurred, quotes Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies and a nationally known pop culture expert. "We kid ourselves into thinking we're all the same, that we're a classless society," she said. "Class divisions in this country are getting wider all the time."

12/1/10

An article in Fast Company reports on the work of architecture Assistant Professor Sergio López-Piñeiro, who will work with the Buffalo Olmsted Park Conservancy this winter to plow snow in Buffalo's Front Park into a whimsical, polka dot pattern.

12/2/10

An article in the Bay Area Reporter looks at "Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture," the first major museum exhibition to examine sexual identity in modern American portraits and co-curated by Jonathan Katz, director of the doctoral program in visual studies. An article on the exhibition also appears in the Huffington Post.

12/2/10

A story on the radio show "Keeping Up with Gen Y" on the WomensRadio Network interviewed Bincy Wilson, a doctoral student in the School of Social Work, on her experiences trying to help victims of sexual exploitation. A story also appeared on Y Gen Out Loud.

12/1/10

The Toronto Globe and Mail's "Did You Know?" column reports researchers from UB and Cornell found that using a credit card caused shoppers to purchase more unhealthy foods than when they paid for groceries in cash.

12/3/10

An article in Good magazine reports on the work of architecture Assistant Professor Sergio López-Piñeiro, who will work with the Buffalo Olmsted Park Conservancy this winter to plow snow in Buffalo's Front Park into a whimsical, polka dot pattern. The project was also featured on Cannon Design Blog and World Design Forum.

12/5/10

An article in the New York Times about a Baltimore cardiologist who inserted 30 of a company's cardiac stents in a single day and now faces a lawsuit from patients who claim they received unnecessary implants quotes William Boden, professor of medicine and preventive medicine. Articles also appeared in the Spartanburg Herald Journal and St. Louis Post Dispatch, among others.

12/4/10

An article in the Washington Post about the large community of Somali expatriates who have returned to Somalia to join that nation's fragile transitional government, despite the immense risks they face for doing so, includes among them UB alumnus Mohamed A. Mohamed, who was named prime minister.

12/6/10

An article on Inside Higher Ed looks at the new exhibit, "Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture," co-curated by Jonathan Katz, associate professor of visual studies. England's Guardian newspaper and Media Matters for America also ran articles.

12/2/10

An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education's Manage Your Career section about the need for employment equity, including in higher education, as two-tiered wage scales become more common was written by Steve Street, a lecturer in UB's writing program.

12/3/10

An article on Consumers Affairs reports moderate consumption of energy drinks can improve people's response time on a lab test measuring behavioral controls, and notes that a second study conducted by Jennifer Temple and colleagues at UB found boys and girls respond differently physiologically to caffeine.

12/8/10

A New York Times story on a study of college students taking foreign languages and sign language quotes Rosemary Feal, a UB professor of Spanish and executive director of the Modern Language Association, who calls it "a vulnerable time for language study. But student interest remains strong." The story ran in papers around the US and Canada, including the Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, Businessweek and USA Today.

12/8/10

A story in the National Law Journal reports that the University at Buffalo was the only law school in New York State that saw an increased number of its students pass the bar exam this past summer, moving to an 83 percent pass rate from 81 percent last year. UB's numbers contrasted with the widespread decrease in the pass rate of many New York law schools, which was the focus of the story.

12/8/10

HealthCanal covered a study by the UB Research Institute on Addictions that showed that couples where both people who drink similar amounts of alcohol and together have healthier relationships than those couples where each person drinks separately and consumes different levels of alcohol. It also was covered by Phys.org.

12/7/10

A story on Phys.org reports on UB research by Sargur Srihari, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, into computational methods to prove how rare is a specific human fingerprint.

12/8/10

An article on MSNBC about memory and how men's and women's brains respond differently to stress reports research conducted by Zhen Yan, professor of physiology and neuroscience, showed that female brains are better able to handle chronic stress.

12/9/10

An article in Toronto Life reports on a new study by scientists at the Research Institute on Addictions that found that couples who drink together feel "increased intimacy and decreased relationship problems the next day" compared to those who drink without their partner or don't drink at all.

12/9/10

An article on Futurity.com reports a UB computer scientist has figured out a way to determine how rare a fingerprint is, and how likely it is to belong to a particular crime suspect.

12/7/10

A report in My Health News Daily discusses a study by Jennifer Temple, assistant professor, departments of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences and Psychology, that found that boys, but not girls, who consume caffeine, see an increase in their blood pressure.

12/2/10

An article in Businessweek magazine about the decades of decay, corruption and failed get-rich-quick schemes that have contributed to the downfall of the City of Niagara Falls quotes Robert Shibley, director of the Urban Design Project who has worked on planning issues with the city.

12/10/10

Jonathan Katz, associate professor of visual studies and co-curator of the National Portrait Gallery's exhibit "Hide/Seek: Differences and Desire in American Portraiture," was interviewed on CBC radio about the removal of a video from the show following complaints from Republican politicians and the Catholic League. An article in The Washington Post reports senior Smithsonian officials are meeting with concerned museum staff over fears that removing the video sets an unwelcome precedent, and that the exhibit's curators have been invited to a forum next week.

12/9/10

An article on Live Science about research that found that people who imagined every chew and swallow of a food actually ate less quotes Leonard Epstein, professor of pediatrics and social and preventive medicine. "Thinking about food has many of the same effects on eating as actually eating the food," he said. "That's new." The article also appeared on Fox News and Mother Nature Network.

12/10/10

An article on Fox News about reality stars like Khloe Kardashian who are comparing the new TSA security pat downs to "public rape," and the outrage rape crisis groups are expressing over the misuse of the word, quotes Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies. "We all have to go through this and it is pathetic for celebrities to think what is happening to them isn't happening to anyone else," she said. "These are low-profile celebrities probably trying to get attention."

12/10/10

An article in the New York Times reports on research conducted by Sargur Srihari, SUNY Distinguished Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, to develop a way to mathematically calculate the rarity of a fingerprint, a technology that could be useful to forensic scientists who are trying to determine how valuable a partial fingerprint is as evidence.

12/10/10

Also in the New York Times, an article reviews "Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture," an exhibition in the National Portrait Gallery co-curated by Jonathan D. Katz, associate professor of visual studies. "Clearly the exhibition covers a lot of ground and raises many questions. It also has wonderful art, and the art stays wonderful whether you ask the questions or not," the review says.

12/12/10

An article in the Baltimore Sun about a doctor who implanted cardiac stents in dozens of cases where they weren't needed quotes William E. Boden, professor of medicine and preventive medicine and the leader of a major study on stent effectiveness.

12/13/10

Leonard Epstein, professor of pediatrics and social and preventive medicine, is quoted in an article in The New York Times about research in the current issue of Science that showed the benefits of "imaginary eating," and found that when people imagined themselves eating M&Ms or pieces of cheese, they were less likely to gorge themselves on the real thing. The findings raise intriguing questions for further research, Epstein said.

12/14/10

An article in the Montreal Gazette about the hype surrounding a possible breakthrough in treating multiple sclerosis reports that not all researchers have corroborated the findings, including Robert Zivadinov, professor of neurology. An article also appeared in the Ottawa Citizen.

12/15/10

An article in The New York Times reports on a talk Wednesday by the curators of the controversial exhibition "Hide/Seek" in the National Portrait Gallery, which two weeks ago decided to remove an AIDS-themed artwork from the show after it came under attack. The article quotes Jonathan Katz, associate professor of visual studies and co-curator of the exhibition, who called the decision to remove the video "abhorrent."

12/15/10

An article distributed by UPI reports on research conducted by Ash Levitt, a postdoctoral fellow at the Research Institute on Addictions, that showed that couples who drink together say they feel increased intimacy and decreased relationship problems the next day than those who drink apart.

12/16/10

A story on North Country Public Radio about the debate over hydrofracking quotes Martin Casstevens, director of UB's Direct Energy and business formation and commercialization manager for the Office of Science, Technology Transfer and Economic Outreach.

12/16/10

An article on the Family Research Council blog reports UB scientists have engineered adult stem cells that can grow continuously in culture by genetically engineering mesenchymal stem cells, a type of adult stem cell from bone marrow that can form other cell types and repair various tissues.

12/15/10

An article on The Next Web about the role social media such as Facebook can play in locating missing children reports that UB graduate students have created a location-based app for Facebook called "AMBER Alert: Project Blue," which notifies users when an AMBER Alert goes out within 50 miles of the city listed on their profile as their current location.

12/17/10

An article in Science magazine about the shift in researchers' thinking about the microbes and viruses in and on our bodies, and the role they play in keeping our bodies functioning, reports Steven Gill, associate professor of microbiology and immunology, and colleagues did a metagenomics study of the gut, and found metabolic genes that complemented the human genome, including ones that break down dietary fiber, amino acids or drugs, and others that produce methane or vitamins.

12/17/10

An article on Discovery News about caffeine consumption in young children quotes Jennifer Temple, a UB behavioral neurobiologist, who said that when it comes to young people, there is almost no evidence to say how much caffeine is too much or what the health effects might be.

12/18/10

An article in the Utica Observer-Dispatch about providing health benefits to part-time public employees quotes Kathryn Foster, director of the Regional Institute, who said, "One way the public sector has historically gotten its talent is to compete on benefits."

12/18/10

An article on Science Centric reports UB neuroscience researchers conducting basic research on ion channels have demonstrated a process that could have a profound therapeutic impact on pain. Articles also appeared on Insciences, a Swiss free-access social networking website dedicated to science from around the world, as well as Science Daily, PhysOrg and Health Canal.

12/17/10

An article in the New York Times about do-it-yourself amateur scientists looks at some of the legal problems these so-called "garage biologists" have encountered, and cites the case of Steve Kurtz, professor of visual studies, who obtained some bacteria from a Pittsburgh geneticist to use in an exhibit, only to find his house surrounded by FBI agents in hazmat suits. The article also appeared in the Seattle Times.

12/15/10

An article in The Better World Report, an annual publication from the Association of University Technology Managers, reports on First Crush, a battery-operated pill crusher developed by UB's Jim Leahy, Jonathan Leahy and Robyn Washousky. The article appears on page 95.

12/22/10

A study by Dietrich Jehle, UB professor of emergency medicine, on the mortality of obese drivers in severe car crashes was covered by the Los Angeles Times, ABC News Radio, BBC Yahoo News, MSN international, Times of India and TV news outlets around the country, including CLTV (Chicago) and KNTV (San Francisco).

12/24/10

UPI.com reports on UB computer engineering students, Austin Miller, Robert Rodenhaus, Leonard Story Jr. and Matthew Taylor who have developed OmniSwitch, which enables people with limited mobility to use a computer using a single button.

12/27/10

NPR's All Things Considered reported on the cleanup of radioactive material at West Valley and cited the wall of volcanic rock intended to prevent further contamination designed by UB Civil, Structural and Environmental student, Shannon Seneca, as part of her thesis.

12/29/10

A story on UB professor of emergency medicine Dietrich Jehle's research that moderately obese people are 22 percent more likely to die after a car crash ran on Michigan Radio, an NPR affiliate.

12/29/10

PhysOrg.com featured the research of UB chemistry Professor Michael Detty, who helped develop dyes that improved solar technologies for producing electricity and hydrogen fuel. Stories also appeared in Global Print Monitor and on Sciencely.com.

12/29/10

News Blaze, College Confidential, and Buffalo Rising are among media outlets featuring a list of News Year's resolutions complied by UB's Office of University Communications based on UB faculty research published in 2010.

12/30/10

An article on Fox News about the top-grossing films in 2010 that also were family-friendly quote Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies. Parents are spending more time with their children, and movies are one way to do that, she said.

12/30/10

An article in the Business Insider about financial firms that are rumored to have been using deception experts to train their employees reports Mark Frank, professor of communication and an expert in detecting deception, told the Wall Street Journal that he has received repeated requests from Wall Street firms asking him to analyze people for them.

12/31/10

A UPI article reports UB chemists have developed photosensitizing dyes that could greatly increase the efficiency of light-driven systems that produce green energy.