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Undergraduate Degree Program

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UB's Philosophy Department offers a major and a minor in philosophy, and also provides the opportunity for joint degrees with other programs. Many of our students are joint or double majors with such departments as Psychology, English and Computer Science. The philosophy major builds the foundation for success in future endeavors.

Philosophy and the GRE

Philosophy majors:

  • Have the highest average verbal reasoning score of students in any major.
  • Have the highest average quantitative reasoning score of students in any humanities major.
  • Have a higher average quantitative reasoning score than students in any social science major.
  • Are the only humanities majors with an average quantitative reasoning score that is above average.
  • Have the highest average analytic writing score of students in any major.

Students declaring an intention to go to graduate school in Philosophy:

  • Have the highest average overall score of students in any major in the arts, humanities, social sciences, life sciences, education and business.
  • Have the highest average verbal reasoning score of students in any major.
  • Have a higher average quantitative reasoning score than students in any social science major except economics.
  • Have the highest average analytic writing score of students in any major.

Philosophy and the LSAT

Philosophy majors:

  • Have the highest average score of students in any humanities major.
  • Have a higher average score than students in any social science or natural science major, except mathematics and economics.
  • Have a higher average score than students in other popular pre-law majors like political science, communications and public administration.

Philosophy and the GMAT

Philosophy majors:

  • Score 15% higher than any type of business major (accounting, finance, management, etc.).
  • Have a higher average score than students in any major, except mathematics.

The reason usually given for such excellent performance on these examinations is that philosophy majors develop problem solving skills at a level of abstraction that cannot be achieved through the case-study or profession-specific approach favored in disciplines geared towards occupational training. People with strong abstract reasoning skills do better in applied fields, on average, than people who lack the ability to abstract from particular problem-situations.