Summer 2020 UB Seminar Courses

The following summer 2020 sections are for students who failed or resigned their UB Seminar. 

3-credit UB Seminars (199)

Incoming first-year and transfer students with less than 45 domestic credits take a 3-credit UB Seminar. 

HIS 199 - Fashion in the Modern World

The history of clothing is in many ways the history of civilization itself. How do we come to wear the clothes that we wear? Why does fashion change over time and from place to place? Do clothes simply reflect our personal choices or are they representative of power structures in society? Or do they in fact help create those hierarchies? The purpose of this class is two-fold. Firstly, it is designed to introduce students to the types of broad, far-reaching questions college courses often address, the methodologies used to interrogate them, and the skills required to succeed at UB (including: research skills, critical thinking, oral and written proficiency and ethical reasoning.) To that end, the class will explore the history of the production, consumption, and meaning of fashion and clothing in the modern West from the eighteenth century until the present.

 

Credits: 3

Registration Number: 11963

Section: MCD

Instructor: Patrick McDevitt

Location: Online (Online)

Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.

PSC 199 - Making Sense of the 2016 Presidential Election

What explains the result of the 2016 U.S. presidential election? How can we make sense of a campaign that started long before this Novembers election, beginning with each party's nomination process and culminating with more than 120 million votes cast? How did we get here, with this particular set of candidates and issues at the forefront among the hundreds of other potential candidates and issues? How do candidates, voters, outside groups, and the media navigate the increasingly complex rules that regulate, among other things, campaign finance and voting rights? What can we learn from previous elections that helps us understand the current contest? How did our understanding of campaigns change over the last half century? This course will consider these questions by introducing students to the political science literature on U.S. presidential elections.

 

Credits: 3

Registration Number: 11965

Section: YOS

Instructor: Antoine Yoshinaka

Location: Online (Online)

Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.

1-credit UB seminars (198)

Transfer students with 45 or more domestic credits take a 1-credit UB Seminar.

PSY 198SEM - Empathizing with Empathy

Why do we cringe away from the pain of others? Why does it make us uncomfortable to see others uncomfortable? What motivates us to act, often against our own best interest, to help our friends, family, or strangers? For many, trying to understand and alleviate the pain of others is a way of life, but what might contribute to a behavior that, on the surface, appears to bring more pain than pleasure? This course will investigate the causes, consequences, uses, and presentation of empathy in our daily lives, with a particular emphasis on the relationship between empathy and prosocial behavior.

Section: MX
Registration Number: 12005
Instructor: Goddard,Erica Lee
Location: Online (Online)