Fall 2018 UB Seminar Courses (3-credit)

The following are approved 3-credit UB Seminar courses for Fall 2018 with open seats. Incoming first-year and transfer students with less than 45 domestic credits will take a 3-credit UB Seminar. 

Registration Reminder

Before registering, browse all UB Seminar options and ensure you have found your final choice. After enrolling, you will be unable to make a change in your selection. 

AAS 199SEM - The American Image:Art, Media

How do images affect culture, society, and identity in America? As Americans, how do we sort out whom we are, while constantly bombarded with images and symbols telling us who we should be? These are a few of the questions we will explore in this cross-cultural course on American diversity. Investigating the roles of race, class, religion, gender, and sexuality in the world of images. Throughout the semester, we will pay particular attention to visual mediums such as art, television, movies, printed images, and a host of cultural symbols affecting us everyday. Readings and other course materials are interdisciplinary, including anthropological and historical perspectives, documentary films, literary material, and most of all, art.

Section: NEZ1
Registration Number: 21064
Instructor: Zarragoitia,Nestor E
Schedule: MWF 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Alumni 88 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 14

AAS 199SEM - The African American Artist

From their earliest arrival in the American colonies until current times, African American artists have strived to establish their artistic traditions, while at the same time grappling with their historical social, economic, and political statuses in society. This course will explore that journey, including their struggles for self-identity in an art world whose traditions are rooted in disparity. This class will focus on different eras, art movements, and the lives and works of key artists that define this vision. We will examine the overall impacts of the African Diaspora on artistic expression, and the interwoven social issues confronting each generation.

Section: NEZ2
Registration Number: 21065
Instructor: Zarragoitia,Nestor E
Schedule: MWF 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Capen 109 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 23

AAS 199SEM - Aesthetic of Culture

This course will offer the opportunity to explore various African and African American, traditions and life experiences through the lens of film. From an aesthetic point of view we will gain insight and appreciation by analyzing cinematic productions through various methodologies. Students will gain knowledge of the deciphering modes of viewing movies while developing reception skills that are unique to the understanding of the African American experience. The socio-cultural issues being addressed by these films, while experiencing the artistic forces that shape them.

Section: PAP
Registration Number: 20792
Instructor: Pappas,James G
Schedule: MW 3:00pm - 4:20pm
Location: Bell 138 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 25

AAS 199SEM - African Amer & the City

This seminar explores the social, political, and economic development, as well as the transformation of African American urban experiences from the early 19th century through the 20th century. Emphases will be placed on the social conditions of urban life, the impact of economic policies, geographical location, labor, migration, family and institutional development, and responses to new forms of social control. The course explores the relationship between racial identification and community formation, and assesses the impact of notions of community and community solidarity. It also examines the impact of class and gender on community formation and how communities evolve over time as populations, the economy, and government policies and change in a climate of disinvestment and reinvestment.

Section: WIL
Registration Number: 21954
Instructor: Williams,Lillian S
Schedule: R 1:00pm - 3:40pm
Location: Clemen 1030 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 19

AED 199SEM - Built Environment & the Body

FOR APPROVED ARCHITECTURE B.S. STUDENTS *ONLY*

Section: BODY
Registration Number: 21193
Instructor: Tauke,Beth A
Schedule: M 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Hayes 403 (South Campus)
Seats Available: 37

AHI 199SEM - Queer and Feminist Art

This UB Seminar explores Feminist, Queer, and Critical Race Theoretical approaches to writing about art since 1945. What forms of meaning previously unexplored in Art History and Art Criticism emerge in these approaches? Where and how do these approaches intersect?

Section: TT
Registration Number: 20643
Instructor: Triandos,Theodoros I
Schedule: M 6:30pm - 9:10pm
Location: Cfa 144 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 26

AMS 199SEM - New Comers:The Caribbean Ameri

The New Comers: The Caribbean American Immigrant Experience: The New Comers is a multi-disciplinary course which explores the urban experiences of the United States largest Latino immigrants including Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, Cubans and compare their experiences with those of West Indians from Jamaica and Barbados. The course will draw on the methodology of documentary, history, sociology, and economics to examine this topic. We will further explore the socio-cultural, economic experiences and identity formation of these immigrant groups in the United States.

Section: CEN
Registration Number: 20832
Instructor: Centrie,Craig G
Schedule: TR 3:30pm - 4:50pm
Location: Park 145 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 17

AMS 199SEM - New Comers:The Caribbean Ameri

The New Comers: The Caribbean American Immigrant Experience: The New Comers is a multi-disciplinary course which explores the urban experiences of the United States largest Latino immigrants including Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, Cubans and compare their experiences with those of West Indians from Jamaica and Barbados. The course will draw on the methodology of documentary, history, sociology, and economics to examine this topic. We will further explore the socio-cultural, economic experiences and identity formation of these immigrant groups in the United States.

Section: CEN2
Registration Number: 21066
Instructor: Centrie,Craig G
Schedule: TR 5:00pm - 6:20pm
Location: Baldy 108 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 24

AMS 199SEM - Native American Celebrity

Since the time of first contact, North American Indigenous societies have been a source of fascination for the Western world. At times exoticized, romanticized, feared, and detested, perceptions of Native American people were more a reflection of non-Indigenous interests and values than accurate accounts of indigenous histories, cultures and beliefs. Consequently, facts were replaced with the more important "image" of Indigenous peoples which in turn gave way to stereotypes and an assumed, colonized authority over them. For more than two hundred years Native people have then become cast as icons - heroic and otherwise - of American mythology, which has resulted in an often uneasy relationship between historical narrative, racial constructs, and national consciousness.Questions to be explored in this seminar include: How have (in) famous? Indigenous personalities been perceived by mainstream society in the past and present? And, what is the place of Indigenous people within modern contexts of popular and celebrity culture? This course will examine those Native American individuals who have been elevated as celebrities during their lifetimes (and beyond), the circumstances around their fame, and the subsequent impact of such celebrity status upon them and all Indigenous people. Factors to consider will include the social and political climate of historical contexts, responses to Indigenous celebrity then and now, and how media and technology has affected these issues in the present.

Section: DEM
Registration Number: 21730
Instructor: Demchak,Stephen John
Schedule: MW 12:00pm - 1:20pm
Location: Clemen 119 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 26

AMS 199SEM - Native American Celebrity

Since the time of first contact, North American Indigenous societies have been a source of fascination for the Western world. At times exoticized, romanticized, feared, and detested, perceptions of Native American people were more a reflection of non-Indigenous interests and values than accurate accounts of indigenous histories, cultures and beliefs. Consequently, facts were replaced with the more important "image" of Indigenous peoples which in turn gave way to stereotypes and an assumed, colonized authority over them. For more than two hundred years Native people have then become cast as icons - heroic and otherwise - of American mythology, which has resulted in an often uneasy relationship between historical narrative, racial constructs, and national consciousness.Questions to be explored in this seminar include: How have (in) famous? Indigenous personalities been perceived by mainstream society in the past and present? And, what is the place of Indigenous people within modern contexts of popular and celebrity culture? This course will examine those Native American individuals who have been elevated as celebrities during their lifetimes (and beyond), the circumstances around their fame, and the subsequent impact of such celebrity status upon them and all Indigenous people. Factors to consider will include the social and political climate of historical contexts, responses to Indigenous celebrity then and now, and how media and technology has affected these issues in the present.

Section: DEM2
Registration Number: 24430
Instructor: Demchak,Stephen John
Schedule: MW 8:00am - 9:20am
Location: Clemen 102 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 27

AMS 199SEM - New World Imaginaries

What is the "New World" and what place does it hold in the cultural imagination of the United States? How have ideas about the "New World" been developed and reinforced? And what are the consequences, in the past as well as the present, of imagining that the Americas were a "New World"? This course explores the notion that the "New World" is a concept that was socially constructed, that this concept has had wide-ranging consequences for the development of the United States, and that our understandings (and misunderstandings) of Native American peoples and tribal nations are closely tied to the ways that the "New World" was imagined in the past and continues to be conceptualized in contemporary US society.

Section: MTP
Registration Number: 23921
Instructor: Mt. Pleasant,Alyssa
Schedule: TR 2:00pm - 3:20pm
Location: Park 143 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 23

APY 199SEM - Contemporary Warfare

This seminar explores war as a contemporary social and political issue, and the effects of war on social life. Questions we will examine include the following. Is war intrinsic to human nature? Does culture cause war? How has the use of technology, especially drones and robots, altered the conduct of war? Why are women used as weapons of war? How do people in war-torn societies endure violence? The course will also explore debates about the so-called War on Terror and about recent attacks by ISIS and other militant groups. Our case studies will be drawn from many areas of the globe, including Rwanda, Iraq, Afghanistan, Colombia, Indonesia, and the United States. Please note this course is for students in the Honors Program only

Section: NEO
Registration Number: 20743
Instructor: Neofotistos,Vasiliki
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Filmor 354 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 26

APY 199SEM - A World of Stone

A World of Stone is a mixed seminar and laboratory-oriented course that focuses on the importance of stone as a natural resource and aspect of technology in world prehistory. The primary focus of the course is on the analysis and interpretation of chipped stone tools in archaeological context from a design perspective, including the hands-on production of tools through flint-knapping. The course also provides a survey of the use of stone in various contexts, from monumental architecture to the smallest of stone tool fragments, and from around the globe and at different times in prehistory to include: stone tools in paleo-anthropology- as critical elements of hominid evolution, Olmec Heads, Inca Stones, Stonehenge, birdstones and bannerstones, among others. The course examines stone tool materials, production technologies, use and discard patterns- from design and organization of technology frameworks. These aspects of technology are discussed in the context of problem-oriented research relating to subsistence, settlement patterns, land use, social organization and political development at various times in human history. Laboratory sessions will involve hands-on projects to aid in recognizing characteristics of stone artifacts and developing analyses that incorporate such characteristics. Students will participate in flint-knapping experiments and are encouraged to use the tools and debitage they make as experimental archaeological data.

Section: PER
Registration Number: 20918
Instructor: Perrelli,Douglas J
Schedule: MWF 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Filmor 354 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 24

APY 199SEM - Immigration Stories

Why do people migrate? What is the difference between an immigrant and a refugee? What factors influence the ways in which individuals and families adjust to their lives in a new place? What is the difference between the experiences of first generation immigrants (those who moved) and their children and grandchildren? In this seminar, we will study these questions by looking at the stories migrants tell about their experiences. We will also look at the types of policies and programs in different countries and cities that are aimed at immigrants. Our focus will be on immigrants and refugees who have settled in the United States and in Western European nations like France, Italy, and Great Britain. Students will have the opportunity to develop research projects on immigration that might include interviewing immigrants ? some of whom might be members of their own families.

Section: RDA
Registration Number: 20745
Instructor: Reed-Danahay,Deborah E.
Schedule: MW 2:00pm - 3:20pm
Location: Filmor 354 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 16

ART 199SEM - Art in the Toxic Field

This seminar couples academic and empirical research with the practice of art making, with an emphasis on drawing, to examine the toxicity of the environment around us. People pollute the environment as individuals, corporations, and governments. Buffalo is rich in its history of industry and the waste that comes with it, from the development of hydrogenated fats to nuclear bombs. Physical evidence abounds, in analog and digital archives and in the land itself. Through primary research in UB's Archives, text analysis, presentations on contemporary art, and field trips, students will investigate and respond to the impact of industry on the natural environment. The class will pay particular attention to the Love Canal. In 1978, this dumpsite near Niagara Falls brought the issue of industrial waste to national attention when citizen activists revealed that the subdivision and elementary school where they lived were built atop 20,000 tons of hazardous chemical materials.

Section: JL
Registration Number: 22983
Instructor: Linder,Joan L
Schedule: 10:00am - 12:40pm
Location: Cfa 218 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 17

ART 199SEM - Injuring me; Injuring you

Injurying Me, Injurying You: The Body In Pain. This seminar explores the body as a site of interchange between visuality and trauma. We will be concerned with the signifying conventions of representing trauma in visual culture and art. As a class, we will discuss trauma in both western and non-western contexts, and ask the following questions: How can we represent traumatic events? How does the body feature in this presentation? How can we understand the body as it enunciates traumatic events? What are the theoretical discussions around the body and its relationship to traumatic events? What are different modes of witnessing? What are the differences between massive cultural traumas (like genocide), and personal experiences of trauma? What strategies have artists developed to address these questions? The subject of this class is intrinsically interdisciplinary and requires a synthetic methodology that draws widely upon different theoretical strategies in psychology, art history, anthropology, critical theory, feminism, history, philosophy, political science, and sociology. Students are encouraged to explore any and all disciplinary models in thinking about trauma and the body, and are required to regularly reflect on artworks and readings in blog posts, develop a research paper, and present their insights on art and trauma in class using one artwork.

Section: JT
Registration Number: 24379
Instructor: Tumbas,Jasmina
Schedule: W 9:00am - 11:40am
Location: Filmor 352 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 25

ART 199SEM - The Artists Journey

The idea of a journey suggests an intensely personal quest for change or fulfillment where a considerable amount of time and distance will be covered. Making the decision to be an artist is committing to a lifelong journey where one expects to encounter unknown obstacles and detours. There is no map to follow or guarantee of safe passage. It is risky but it can also be highly rewarding. In this course a diverse group of emerging, mid-career and established artists are observed as they reflect upon their lives, sources of inspiration, motivations and working processes. Profiled artists include painters, sculptors, printmakers, photographers, installation and new media artists from diverse demographic and cultural backgrounds. Through exposure to these artists, students will be introduced to the expanded field of contemporary visual art.

Section: MG
Registration Number: 21614
Instructor: Goldfarb,Maximilian
Schedule: T 12:00pm - 2:40pm
Location: Alumni 88 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 21

AS 199SEM - The Idea of India

70 years after gaining independence, and more than a century after beginning its struggle for independence from the British Raj, this course will evaluate the legacy of India as both an idea and a reality by asking: To what extent has postcolonial India lived up to the promises outlined in the preamble to its 1949 constitution ?to secure to all its citizens? justice, liberty, equality, and fraternity? What role has colonialism played in shaping present-day Indian society? ?The Idea of India? will serve as an introduction to the vexed histories of colonialism, caste, gender, religion, language, and politics in modern India. No prerequisite coursework or experience with Asian Studies is expected prior to the start of the course. Students enrolled in the course will examine primary sources and secondary scholarship to understand debates about India?s status (aspiration or actual) as an independent political, cultural, and economic unit. Through online ?running notes? and exercises, in-class debates, and a final project, students will employ a various media (written, oral, visual) to argue, synthesize, and critically analyze unresolved questions about India?s past, present, and future. We will connect ethical debates about area studies with discussions of academic integrity to explore the broader political implications of how, why, and for whom knowledge gets produced.

Section: HAK
Registration Number: 23528
Instructor: Hakala,Walter Nils
Schedule: MWF 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Clemen 21 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 23

BMS 199SR - New Frontiers in Biomed Scienc

New Frontiers in Biomedical Sciences: Students will engage with topics on medicine and health that relate to their everyday lives. The topics discussed will be pulled from the news and current events. These topics will encompass subjects we encounter either in our daily lives or as a larger community. Students will learn how to review articles from a scientific point of view and look at topics of health in the news from the prospective of a health professional. Small group recitations will be taught by a department within the school of medicine and topics will be examined through the lens of those individual departments. Subject areas will range from the cold flu, and Zika viruses to more controversial topics like medical marijuana, environmental hazards, and rising cost of health care. Students will have the opportunity to engage with the material under the guidance of medical school departments such as pharmacology & toxicology, biomedical informatics, microbiology, physiology and clinical lab sciences.

Section: A
Registration Number: 21088
Instructor: Shubert,David E
Schedule: T 10:00am - 11:20am
Location: Kapoor 125 (South Campus)
Seats Available: 8

BMS 199SR - New Frontiers in Biomed Scienc

This recitation will discuss the Tuesday lecture from a Neuroscience perspective.

Section: A1
Registration Number: 21089
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: R 10:00am - 11:20am
Location: Dfn 05 (South Campus)
Seats Available: 8

BMS 199SR - Power of Com Engage to Reduce

The Power of Community Engagement to Reduce Health Disparities: The United States is becoming increasingly diverse and is burden with disparities. The involvement of community in research and academia is critical to reducing disparities in health, workforce, and social determinants of health. Community engagement is the foundation of service learning and T4 translation research embodied in community based research, particularly in participatory research. Understanding how to operationalize community engagement will facilitate advances in translational research, service learning, and workforce development. This course will provide the foundation for community engagement by critically appraising what is meant by community, community engagement, and health disparities. We will explore the impact of community engagement on translational research, service learning, and workforce development.

Section: B
Registration Number: 22772
Instructor: Tumiel-Berhalter,Laurene M
Schedule: T 3:00pm - 4:20pm
Location: Dfn 207 (South Campus)
Seats Available: 18

BMS 199SR - Power of Com Engage to Reduce

The Power of Community Engagement to Reduce Health Disparities. The United States is becoming increasingly diverse and is burden with disparities. The involvement of community in research and academia is critical to reducing disparities in health, workforce, and social determinants of health. Community engagement is the foundation of service learning and T4 translation research embodied in community based research, particularly in participatory research. Understanding how to operationalize community engagement will facilitate advances in translational research, service learning, and workforce development. This course will provide the foundation for community engagement by critically appraising what is meant by community, community engagement, and health disparities. We will explore the impact of community engagement on translational research, service learning, and workforce development.

Section: B1
Registration Number: 22773
Instructor: Tumiel-Berhalter,Laurene M
Schedule: R 3:00pm - 4:20pm
Location: Dfn 207 (South Campus)
Seats Available: 18

CEP 199SEM - Educational Inequalities

Educational Inequalities and Achievement Gaps: How unequal are educational opportunities and achievement outcomes among racial and socioeconomic groups of students in the nation?s public schools? Why do American students? math and science achievement lag behind their peers in other developed nations? What cause educational underachievement among disadvantaged minority students? What policy interventions work for eliminating the inequality of educational opportunities and closing the achievement gaps? In this seminar, students will read about and discuss major educational inequity issues facing educators and policy makers today. By taking the course, students will be able to understand the state, causes and consequences of educational inequity problems and to explore evidence-based policy interventions.

Section: JL
Registration Number: 23972
Instructor: Lee,Jaekyung
Schedule: TR 8:30am - 9:50am
Location: Norton 216 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 20

CHI 199SEM - Today's China

This course is an introduction to contemporary China from the founding of the People?s Republic of China in 1949. Today?s China invites students to read articles and watch visual material that presents contemporary Chinese culture and society from a number of perspectives. This class invites students to gain understanding of China as an idea, as an important subject for American foreign policy, an as a multifaceted society and culture. The UB Seminar is an introduction to the expectations and opportunities for undergraduate students at the University at Buffalo. By the end of the course, students will gain an understanding of the society and culture of contemporary China and acquire research and study skills to perform at a university level.

Section: 000
Registration Number: 24639
Instructor: Macdonald,Sean
Schedule: MWF 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Norton 209 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 25

CL 199SEM - Seven Wond of Ancient World

The Great Pyramid at Giza, Hanging Gardens at Babylon, Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, Colossus of Rhodes, and Lighthouse at Alexandria. What do these all have in common? They comprise the renowned Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Learn more about each of them, about those responsible for their creation, and why these things matter in this UB Seminar. The Great Pyramid of Giza (Weeks II-III) provides not only a basis for scholarly research, but has generated an enormous amount of pseudo-science, from being the product of extra-terrestrial visitation to having magical powers. The location of ancient Babylon (Weeks IV-V), in modern Iraq, makes for an ideal consideration of the destruction and protection of sites of World Heritage in times of crisis. Olympia and the Olympic Games (Weeks VI-VII) both provide powerful symbols of nationalism, past and present. Temples, like the one at Ephesos (Weeks VIII-IX), are the direct precursors of churches, synagogues and mosques, and indeed there are still sacred buildings referred to as ?temples?. The original Mausoleum (Weeks X-XI) is not only a successor of the Great Pyramid, but a forerunner of functional buildings intended to glorify individuals, like the Trump Towers, while the Colossus of Rhodes (Weeks XII-XIII) finds a direct descendant in the Statue of Liberty. Finally, the ?Pharos? or Lighthouse at Alexandria (Week XIV), which like all of the other Seven Wonders but for the Pyramids, is lost to us today, is symbolic not only of the greatness of ancient Alexandria, but of how civilizations wax and wane.

Section: 4
Registration Number: 23062
Instructor: Sebastiani,Alessandro
Schedule: MWF 12:00pm - 12:50pm
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 11

CL 199SEM - Happiness:Anc Art of Liv Well

Among all the questions posed by ancient Greek and Roman thinkers, perhaps the most important was how to live a good life. Living well meant not only treating others properly. It also meant treating oneself properly by cultivating all the parts of a satisfying existence. A key lesson from antiquity is that pleasures alone can leave us feeling hollow and unfulfilled. Hence the principle that moderation was a key to happiness. Modern psychological studies confirm the ancient view that happiness is not a simple state, but rather follows from an art of making choices and forming one?s environment. This course will survey a number of perspectives from ancient Greece and Rome on how to live ?a good life,? and compare them with our modern experience. Students will discuss and write about these different perspectives on achieving happiness and compare them with their own views.

Section: COF
Registration Number: 20836
Instructor: Coffee,Neil
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Filmor 328 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 17

CL 199SEM - Handling Monsters: A Handbook

There is no bigger idea than that one that is passed from one culture to another to endure for millennia and provide the very foundation of humanistic values. The ancient Greeks, beginning with the poet Homer, are typically viewed as the people who gave literature to the west. But in that time when Homer's Iliad and Odyssey were beginning to take shape, Greeks were in contact with people of Asia whose attested story-crafting traditions were already centuries old people of Anatolia, Syria-Palestine, and Mesopotamia- that is, people of that region called the Near East. Ideas about the nature of the gods and of the human condition had been spread from culture to culture between these peoples, giving rise to the Hebrew Bible among other codified expressions of such ideas. In their wanderings into Asia the Greeks too came to be exposed to these and still other ideas, and they adopted these big ideas and incorporated them into their culture in their own efforts to engage meaningfully and effectively with the phenomena of human life. In this seminar we will examine the archaic Greek communities who ventured east, the peoples whom they encountered, and the transference of ideas that resulted.

Section: MAL
Registration Number: 20837
Instructor: Boyd,Timothy
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Filmor 328 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 18

CL 199SEM - The Ancient World in the Movie

This course will explore the representation of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds in modern cinema, focusing on films made between 1960 and the present. We will pay attention not only to what these films show us about modern attitudes toward the ancient world, but also to how modern filmmakers use these films, set in antiquity, to talk about our modern world. Students will explore works of literature, ancient and modern, that offer our discussions rich context and further into how narratives reflect and shape cultural values.

Section: MCG
Registration Number: 20840
Instructor: McGuire,Donald T.
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Filmor 351 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 21

COL 199SEM - On Dignity and Death

What is dignity? What is the relationship of dignity to what Victor Hugo calls the inviolability of life, but also and no less trenchantly to both the death penalty and the right to die? How does the concept of dignity work both to defend and to challenge both the death penalty and the right to die? On Dignity and Death explores these questions through readings of philosophy (Cicero, Kant, Hegel, Foucault), criminology (Beccaria), legal and medical accounts (Dworkin, Cohen-Almagor), literature (Hugo, Camus, Capote, Mailer), and abolitionists (Badinter, Prejean). We will also read the Universal Declaration of Universal Human Rights (1948) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (proposed 1966, ratified 1976) in order to examine the paradox of a universal human right to life that coexists with the death penalty. In addition, we will read several United States Supreme Court decisions concerning both the States right to put to death and its right to make live.

Section: DJ
Registration Number: 20644
Instructor: Johnson,David E.
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Norton 209 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 21

COL 199SEM - On Dignity and Death

What is dignity? What is the relationship of dignity to what Victor Hugo calls the inviolability of life, but also and no less trenchantly to both the death penalty and the right to die? How does the concept of dignity work both to defend and to challenge both the death penalty and the right to die? On Dignity and Death explores these questions through readings of philosophy (Cicero, Kant, Hegel, Foucault), criminology (Beccaria), legal and medical accounts (Dworkin, Cohen-Almagor), literature (Hugo, Camus, Capote, Mailer), and abolitionists (Badinter, Prejean). We will also read the Universal Declaration of Universal Human Rights (1948) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (proposed 1966, ratified 1976) in order to examine the paradox of a universal human right to life that coexists with the death penalty. In addition, we will read several United States Supreme Court decisions concerning both the States right to put to death and its right to make live.

Section: DJ2
Registration Number: 21670
Instructor: Johnson,David E.
Schedule: TR 2:00pm - 3:20pm
Location: Frnczk 408 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 22

COL 199SEM - Telling Stories

Although it plays different roles in different cultures and different historical moments, storytelling seems to be a universal human activity. Children want the same stories to be told over and over again in exactly the same manner. As adults, we enjoy stories in literature, film, videos, or computer games. We listen to the stories of friends and family members. Historians, anthropologists and sociologists both research and construct their own stories in order to make sense of human cultures, traditions, laws and religions. Different kind of stories, such as testimonies and eyewitness accounts, are at work in legal trials. Patient stories are important for social workers, psychologists and doctors. Storytelling has invaded even neuroscience and medicine, for example in Kleinman, The Illness Narratives. Some philosophers argue that foundational stories of a given culture teach us about love, moral values, and good life. In this interdisciplinary seminar we will examine stories in literature, folklore, film, anthropology and history, as well as significant stories in your own lives, in order to ask fundamental questions: why do people tell stories? What kind of knowledge and wisdom is conveyed through stories? How are stories related to power and politics? What can story teach you that science cannot? And what counts as a story? How is it constructed? What is the difference between fictional stories and real stories, such as documentaries or history? Our readings will include stories from the Bible-- for example, the story of Isaac and Abraham-- and their subsequently pictorial and philosophical retellings; selected fairytales such as Beauty and the Beast and their film versions, short stories by diverse literary writers, such as Melville, Larsen, Kafka and Dinesen; films, for example the BBC film production of Shakespeare?s Hamlet; legal accounts, selected stories told by anthropologists, for example Carol Stack, All Our Kin, as well as some of the most interesting reflections by historians and literary critics on the role of storytelling in human culture. Students will also be asked to share the most important stories they learned during their first year colloquium and to reflect on the role of sharing stories through social media.

Section: EZ
Registration Number: 21832
Instructor: Ziarek,Ewa Plonowska
Schedule: MWF 5:00pm - 5:50pm
Location: Park 250 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 15

COL 199SEM - Art & Madness

When we think of artists we often imagine people who are eccentric, at odds with the everyday world, and indulging in impulsive emotions: easily irascible, self-absorbed, volatile, passionate, melancholic, and self-destructive are some of the adjectives that come to mind. Two of the most celebrated modern artists have been known for their madness and social isolation: Van Gogh and Beethoven. Their iconic status in popular culture as prototypical romantic artists is not accidental, since it was Romanticism that established the modern image of the artistic genius as a mad and self-destructive character. At the same time, the artist's volatile psychology is often explained as the effect of inspiration: the artist seems to have a special, even sacred relation to a higher, spiritual reality to which average people lack access.

Section: KN
Registration Number: 23597
Instructor: Nikolopoulou,Kalliopi
Schedule: MWF 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Capen 260 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 22

COL 199SEM - Quarrel Between Philo & Lit

Quarrel Between Philosophy and Literature: Why do philosophers read poets, and why do poets read philosophy? The course will trace the history of this question, beginning with the ?quarrel? between philosophy and poetry in antiquity and leading up to the contemporary conversations and polemics between the two disciplines. This quarrel between philosophy and poetry is mentioned in Plato, and already at that time it was perceived as ?ancient.? The course will begin by exploring the provenance and the stakes of this quarrel as seen by Plato and proceed on this basis to inquire into its formulations in later texts, from ancient Greece to 20th literature, philosophy, and film. This seminar is open to all students interested in exploring the fascinating and challenging intersections between the two main areas of the humanities: literature and philosophy. Reading literary and philosophical texts, we will discuss such questions as the nature of human existence, the problem of time, death, and finitude, the role of gender, as well as the differences and similarities between imagination and reason, passion and logic, literary language and philosophical argumentation. What is the difference between how poetry and philosophy address and express those issues? How is poetic/literary saying different from philosophical ways of telling? How do we think between poetic images and philosophical reasoning/argumentation? In the first part of the course, we will examine convergences and differences between literary and philosophical texts in antiquity (Plato, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Sophocles' tragedies), the Middle Ages (Boethius), and the Enlightenment (Voltaire). Rethinking the heritage of Greek culture and tragedy for the moderns, Nietzsche's influential study The Birth of Tragedy will serve as the transition to the questions that characterize contemporary debates between philosophy and literature. After The Birth of Tragedy, we will read essays by Heidegger and Irigaray, and a number of literary texts: short stories by Dinesen, Borges, and Faulkner, poetry by Wislawa Szymborska, Reggio?s film, Koyaanisqatsi.

Section: KZ
Registration Number: 21833
Instructor: Ziarek,Krzysztof
Schedule: MWF 5:00pm - 5:50pm
Location: Park 440 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 26

COM 199SEM - Entertainment Education

Do you enjoy stories? Love watching drama? When was the last time you binged on Netflix? Was there something more than just an escape from the reality? Well, in this seminar, we will embark on a journey here in the U.S. and around the world to explore how writers, producers, directors, and researchers have been using the power of storytelling in popular media to save lives and change norms. By the end of the semester, you will have developed a deeper understanding of the entertainment-education communication strategy for health promotion and social change.

Section: HW
Registration Number: 20814
Instructor: Wang,Hua
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Talbrt 112 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 15

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: A
Registration Number: 20731
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: MW 5:00pm - 5:50pm
Location: Nsc 222 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 70

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: B
Registration Number: 20732
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: MW 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Hoch 114 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 45

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: B1
Registration Number: 21043
Instructor: Ko,Steven
Schedule: F 5:00pm - 5:50pm
Location: Norton 216 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: B2
Registration Number: 21044
Instructor: Ko,Steven
Schedule: R 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Baldy 125 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 6

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: B4
Registration Number: 21046
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: R 12:00pm - 12:50pm
Location: Norton 210 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: C
Registration Number: 20737
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: MW 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Cooke 121 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 28

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: C1
Registration Number: 21042
Instructor: Ko,Steven
Schedule: F 12:00pm - 12:50pm
Location: Norton 209 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: D
Registration Number: 21468
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: MW 5:00pm - 5:50pm
Location: Nsc 218 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 35

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: D4
Registration Number: 21472
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: F 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Cooke 127B (North Campus)
Seats Available: 18

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: E
Registration Number: 22073
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: MW 5:00pm - 5:50pm
Location: Nsc 228 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 46

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: E2
Registration Number: 22082
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: 5:00pm - 5:50pm
Location: Cooke 127A (North Campus)
Seats Available: 11

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: E3
Registration Number: 22083
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: R 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Alumni 88 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 13

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: E4
Registration Number: 23429
Instructor: Winikus,Jennifer
Schedule: F 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Norton 216 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 5

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: F
Registration Number: 22072
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: MW 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Knox 110 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 56

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: F1
Registration Number: 22084
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: F 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Norton 213 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 12

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: F2
Registration Number: 22085
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: F 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 6

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: F3
Registration Number: 22086
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: R 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Capen 108 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 7

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: F4
Registration Number: 22087
Instructor: Hartloff,Jesse Lee
Schedule: R 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Baldy 109 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 11

DMS 199SEM - Making and Being Made by Media

Section: LISO
Registration Number: 23722
Instructor: Lison,Andrew
Schedule: MW 1:00pm - 2:20pm
Location: Cfa 244 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 19

DMS 199SEM - From Screens to Screens

Open to Freshman ONLY. In todays culture, moving images circulate across platforms and screens; film, television, and video shape our lives in a variety of ways. They persuade, entertain, educate, and distract us. In this seminar, students will learn to critically analyze moving images through making. The course will introduce students to the history of media production and study with screenings and readings that highlight the range of approaches to the organization and reception of media work. The seminar is organized into practical workshops and discussions. Assignments will require students to develop their reading and writing skills in addition to learning the basic principles of documentary, narrative, and experimental filmmaking including scriptwriting, interviewing, cinematography, editing, and distribution tools.

Section: SARL
Registration Number: 20749
Instructor: Sarlin,Paige H
Schedule: MW 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Cfa 286 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 16

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: I
Registration Number: 21012
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: MW 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Nsc 222 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 11

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: I3
Registration Number: 21015
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: M 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Park 440 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: I4
Registration Number: 21016
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: F 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Bell 337 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 13

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: J
Registration Number: 21017
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: TR 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Knox 110 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 30

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: J2
Registration Number: 21019
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: R 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Obrian 214 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: J3
Registration Number: 21020
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: W 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Location: Clemen 106 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 20

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: J4
Registration Number: 21021
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: R 12:00pm - 12:50pm
Location: Obrian 214 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: K
Registration Number: 21022
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: MW 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Alumni 97 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 80

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: K1
Registration Number: 21023
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: F 12:00pm - 12:50pm
Location: Talbrt 103 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 15

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: K2
Registration Number: 21024
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: T 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Capen 257 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 22

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: K3
Registration Number: 21025
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: F 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Capen 110 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 17

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: K4
Registration Number: 21026
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: F 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Talbrt 103 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 25

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Section: L
Registration Number: 21461
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: MW 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Location: Baldy 101 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 46

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Section: L1
Registration Number: 21462
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: W 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Talbrt 103 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 10

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Section: L2
Registration Number: 21463
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: R 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Talbrt 112 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Section: L3
Registration Number: 21464
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: T 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Capen 109 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 11

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Section: L4
Registration Number: 21465
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: M 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Park 440 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 24

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: T
Registration Number: 21028
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: TR 8:30am - 9:20am
Location: Davis 101 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 56

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: T2
Registration Number: 21030
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: W 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Park 440 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 26

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: T3
Registration Number: 21031
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: F 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Norton 216 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 32

ECO 199SEM - Understanding Labor Policy

How does the minimum wage impact workers and firms? What are the trends in earnings inequality over time? How does immigration affect the welfare of natives? This course will examine these and other important questions concerning labor markets. It will introduce the basic economic principles and critical thinking necessary to assess public policies. Students will gain an understanding of the rationale and objectives of policy interventions and ways to conduct policy evaluation. Students will also develop the basic skills and institutional knowledge required to assess existing labor regulations. A wide range of topics will be covered including minimum wages, social security, disability and unemployment benefits, antidiscrimination laws, labor unions, immigration restrictions, financial aid for education, welfare programs, tax policy, and earnings inequality. Prior knowledge of economics is not required.

Section: JSM
Registration Number: 21071
Instructor: McLaughlin,Joanne Song
Schedule: MW 4:00pm - 5:20pm
Location: Capen 260 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 22

ELP 199SEM - Afr Amer Struggle for Equal Ed

African American Struggles for Equal Educational Opportunity: This course studies the history of Black Student and other Social Movements in the U.S. in the struggle for equal and high quality educational opportunities. We will look at the ideological, political and economic origins of Black Protest movements for equal education, and explore the rhetoric and tactics employed to achieve those goals. We will pay particular attention to the structures of oppression (slavery, Jim Crow and ultimately mass Incarceration) and how they have worked to suppress and oppress the rights and freedom of both poor people and Black people of all economic statuses.

Section: A
Registration Number: 22505
Instructor: Durand,Henry J
Schedule: T 4:00pm - 6:50pm
Location: Clemen 117 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 10

ENG 199SEM - Making Shakespeare

William Shakespeare really did exist, and really did write all or most of the plays traditionally attributed to him, as well as some others which have been lost. But how did Shakespeare become Shakespeare, the quintessential author in the western literary tradition, the bane and delight of every school child today, and the continued subject of critical, philosophical, and aesthetic appreciation and reinterpretation? We can address this question through any number of Shakespeare's plays. Our proof text for this semester will be Hamlet, in the 2010 Norton Critical Edition of the play, edited by Robert Miola, which combines comparative texts from the early editions of the plays with records of performances from Edwin Booth to Jude Law, contexts from the Bible to Thomas Kyd, criticism from John Dryden to Margreta DeGrazia, and afterlives from 18th-century experimentation with the plays ending to Tom Stoppard and John Updike.

Section: BON
Registration Number: 20647
Instructor: Bono,Barbara J
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 24

ENG 199SEM - Real Life: Telling Stories

This class teaches students how to write compelling stories drawn from real life using the form known as creative nonfiction. The essence of creative nonfiction is all in its name factual stories (non-fiction) written stylishly and well (or creatively). Creative nonfiction is especially known as a vehicle for memoirs or personal essays, but this wide-ranging term also includes a diverse number of styles that include travel writing, popular science, investigative reporting, autobiography, political opinion, magazine journalism, war writing, sports writing, current affairs, and popular science. The opportunities are endless and creativity is key.

Section: BRA
Registration Number: 24096
Instructor: Bramen,Carrie T.
Schedule: MWF 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Clemen 438 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 14

ENG 199SEM - Norse Sagas

In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, the tiny nation of Iceland (population at the time of approx. 50,000) created one of the great genres of world literature: the Icelandic saga, the quintessential collection of authentic tales about Vikings. There are at least eight sub-genres of sagas, but it is the Islendingasogur `sagas of Icelanders,? which include more than forty narratives, some as long as three hundred pages, that are most famous and most important in terms of cultural history. In essence it constitutes a heroic literature, but unlike most other heroic literatures of the world, it is a written not an oral tradition, and it is composed in prose not verse; likewise it is a literature by, for, and about not kings and demi-gods but farmers and sheep-herders living in a forbidding climate on a thin-soiled volcanic island in the mid-Atlantic, fifteen hundred kilometers from the Scandinavian mainland. This literary corpus provides an exemplary means to introduce beginning university students to the study of literature not just as the expression of an alien culture (and Viking culture is altogether alien!) but also as an alien aesthetic. But despite its alien nature, this bizarre and initially exasperating literary aesthetic creates some of the most engaging characters in world literature, some of the most dramatically human moral dilemmas, and in the end expresses the essence of Icelandic cultural identity

Section: FRA
Registration Number: 22417
Instructor: Frakes,Jerold Coleman
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 11

ENG 199SEM -

.

Section: KEA
Registration Number: 22418
Instructor: Keane,Damien D
Schedule: TR 2:00pm - 3:20pm
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 27

ENG 199SEM - Me?! Language and the Self

ME?! LANGUAGE AND THE SELF explores ways that language particularly figurative language such as metaphors help construct our sense of who we are in relation to other groups and categories of people. Are you described or perceived as nerdy, cool, fat, thin, large, small, handsome, pretty, homely, black, brown, white, quick, slow? What do these categories mean? Who influences definitions? How does language of popularity, weight, race, appearance, or other descriptive categories (whether essentializing or superficial) impact your life? Language can push us to think more inclusively about ourselves, others, and all things in the world, but it can also carry embedded assumptions that influence our perception and thought.

Section: MIC
Registration Number: 20656
Instructor: Miller,Cristanne Cay
Schedule: MWF 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Alumni 88 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 24

ENG 199SEM - Hollywood and Amer Lit

Hollywood and American Literature examines the impact of motion pictures on narrative fiction and lyric poetry in this country through much of the twentieth century. Like the mass of Americans in these years, writers often fell in love with the movies; but just as consistently they expressed their hostility toward their new cultural rival. In this course, we will read and analyze a representative selection of twentieth century literary materials that have addressed the psychological and sociopolitical repercussions of the growth of the cinema in this country.

Section: SOL
Registration Number: 20658
Instructor: Solomon,William D
Schedule: MWF 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Location: Park 143 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 22

GEO 199SEM - Slums of World's Megacities

In 1975 there were five cities in the world with a population above ten million. At present, there are at least 23 such megacities in the world and this number is predicted to grow significantly over the next couple decades. Such a development means incredible concentrations of the world?s urban poor, as much of this urban growth will take place in the underdeveloped areas of the Global South. Already, slum populations are growing by a staggering 25 million per year. Along with climate change, these concentrations of urban poverty are likely to be the most significant and explosive political problem of the next century. This course examines life in the slums of the world?s megacities. It surveys slums in cities from all over the developing world, including Cairo, Jakarta, Manila, Mexico City, Mumbai, Rio de Janeiro, Johannesburg, S?o Paulo, Kinshasa, and Lagos. The course reviews the major processes responsible for the production of slums, including the structural adjustment programs demanded by international debt holders, neoliberal reductions of government spending and regulation, chaotic conditions in the global countryside, postcolonial legacies of poor infrastructure and racial divisions, and the burgeoning populations of the Global South.

Section: LUS
Registration Number: 23873
Instructor: Lustig,Nicholas F
Schedule: MWF 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Location: Filmor 351 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 22

GLY 199SEM - Mass Extinctions

Earth?s rock record is speckled with both minor and major mass extinction events. The perturbations linked to both small and massive die-offs include sea level rise and fall, rapid cooling and warming events (climate change), massive volcanic events, asteroid impacts, and more. Scientists propose that the Earth is entering into the 6th largest mass extinction event in Earth?s history and yet there is still debate as to if or how a single organism (human-kind) can influence their environment to the point where the elimination of worldwide species could rival that of the termination of the dinosaurs. This UB seminar will focus on the elements suspected of triggering Earth?s largest mass extinctions and how evidence and understanding of these prior events are applied to current extinctions. Through readings, lectures, in-class activities and discussions/debates, and short and term paper writings students will gain an understanding that science, like many disciplines, is not static; science is dynamic and our understandings change and evolve through time. Through this course and its course requirement, students will not only gain critical thinking skills but also skills in studying and time management, research, writing, and speaking

Section: MEE
Registration Number: 23801
Instructor: Meehan,Kimberly C
Schedule: MWF 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Cooke 434 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 10

GLY 199SEM - Design Hearts and Minds

Science and religion both impinge upon some of our most personal and deeply held conceptions, such as our thoughts about who we are, how we came to be, whether or not we have a purpose we may/should/ought to fulfill. These different approaches often, but no always, lead us to different or even conflicting conclusions. In this 3 cr. course we will discuss a series of essays and books that address these issues with a focus on several core questions: What does long--?term evolutionary history look like in the rock record and how do we study it? Is progress a general feature of that history? What do we mean by progress, anyway? Does ?Intelligent Design? offer valid scientific critique of that history or of evolution generally? If not, what accounts for its strength in American society? By thinking carefully about these questions we may learn some useful things about ourselves and one another, as well as gain critical thinking and other valuable tools for effective learning.

Section: MIT
Registration Number: 23800
Instructor: Mitchell,Charles E.
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Cooke 434 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 26

HIS 199SEM - Fashion in the Modern World

The history of clothing is in many ways the history of civilization itself. How do we come to wear the clothes that we wear? Why does fashion change over time and from place to place? Do clothes simply reflect our personal choices or are they representative of power structures in society? Or do they in fact help create those hierarchies? The purpose of this class is two-fold. Firstly, it is designed to introduce students to the types of broad, far-reaching questions college courses often address, the methodologies used to interrogate them, and the skills required to succeed at UB (including: research skills, critical thinking, oral and written proficiency and ethical reasoning.) To that end, the class will explore the history of the production, consumption, and meaning of fashion and clothing in the modern West from the eighteenth century until the present.

Section: MCD
Registration Number: 20763
Instructor: McDevitt,Patrick F
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Park 146 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

HIS 199SEM - Vietnam War

This seminar will consider the causes, events, and consequences of the Vietnam War, or what the Vietnamese call the American War. While investigating the conflict, students will learn about different approaches scholars have used to understand the history of this particular war and American foreign relations more generally. Thus, in addition to the traditional focus on elite decision-making and military strategy, we will consider newer trends such as the interplay between domestic and international politics, the life and views of ordinary people who participated in the conflict, and the life and views of non-Americans.

Section: RAD
Registration Number: 20760
Instructor: Radford,Gail E
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Park 146 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

HIS 199SEM - The Bicycle

Economic recession, health consciousness, environmental sustainability, and the new urbanism have all contributed to a resurgence of interest in bicycling as a hobby and form of transportation in twenty-first-century life. This course will examine both the history of pedaling and bicycling and the technological, ethical, environmental, and social aspects of the bicycle: materials, doping and cheating in racing, green transportation, the ability of women and children and teenagers to ride freely. We will focus in part on Buffalo, a site of innovation in the manufacturing of bicycles and bicycle tires, and a locus of bicycle racing and riding for fun and transportation in the city?s heyday. Buffalo is adding miles of bike lanes now, giving us the opportunity to study intermodal transportation and what it means to be a city undergoing a renaissance. We will also look at the social implications of bicycles for women and youth who had new means of self-powered transportation in their grasp through the twentieth century. Ultimately, we will consider bicycles in a global context, from the decline of bicycling in China and India in favor of cars to the development of courier bicycles for use in Africa and in cities around the world. You don?t need to be a rider to join the class!

Section: SCH
Registration Number: 22023
Instructor: Schen,Claire
Schedule: MWF 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Park 145 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 26

ITA 199SEM - The Renaissance Genius

The early modern period saw the emergence of a seeming unprecedented number of creative geniuses. Michelangelo in painting, sculpture, and architecture; Leonardo da Vinci in drawing and engineering; Niccolo Machiavelli in politics, William Shakespeare in playwriting; and Galileo Galilei in physics and astronomy (to name just the most popular among them). The works of such groundbreaking and extremely versatile geniuses resulted in innovations in all the fields of human knowledge. This course will explore the revolutionary creations, the discoveries, and the intellectual achievements of the men of the fourteenth, fifteenth, and early seventeenth centuries in literature, the arts, and the sciences, as well as the notion of the intellectual exceptionality (the genius) of this period. It will also investigate the influence that all such creations and discoveries had in breaking up with the past and in laying the foundations upon which our contemporary society is built.

Section: UGO
Registration Number: 23560
Instructor: Ugolini,Paola
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Clemen 930 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 16

JDS 199SEM - Modern Rev: Indus, Poli, Socia

Modern Revolutions: Industrial, Political, Social: Hardly any other events in human history have contributed more greatly to the transformation of humanity and its self-understanding after the rise of modern science, than the industrial revolution (steam engine, railroad, factory line), the spread of democracy (American and French revolutions) and the spectre of socialism (Russian revolution). They opened prospects such as the universal spread of democracy, the liberal transformation of religion, the growth of a worldwide metropolitan culture, and the prospect of general prosperity. Seeking to better understand these ends by examining their beginnings, we will explore the old and the new in the prose and poetry of such thinkers and artists as Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Dostoyevsky, Darwin, Bergson and Nietzsche, among others.

Section: COH
Registration Number: 21983
Instructor: Cohen,Richard A
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Bell 138 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 26

JDS 199SEM - Justice

"A law that is not just is not law" said recently a protester against racial discrimination. This argument exemplifies a problem we will address in this course through reading, discussing, theatrically staging, and critically applying the work of the best writers and thinkers, both ancient and contemporary, who addressed the problem of justice in relationship to equality, law, and freedom. In that way, we will conduct a comparative study of the relationship between justice, law, and society in pagan, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Thought.

Section: DOL
Registration Number: 22731
Instructor: Dolgopolski,Sergey B
Schedule: TR 2:00pm - 3:20pm
Location: Clemen 708 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 12

JDS 199SEM - Origins of Good and Evil

Determining the origin of our moral beliefs and values is one of the central debates that has animated Western philosophers and theologians across time. One culture may consider a certain action morally correct and another culture may consider the same action morally incorrect. Why is that? How do we know what is good and evil, right and wrong? Is there one standard that unites different value systems or are all systems equally correct and variable? This course will not directly tackle the specific beliefs themselves (whether it be the ethics of war and peace, euthanasia, suicide, abortion or any such issue), but will seek to examine the different reasons that groups may arrive at diverse answers. We will read selections of classical works such as Plato?s Republic, Aristotle?s Nicomachean Ethics, Hebrew Bible, Aquinas? Summa Theologicae, Nietzsche?s Genealogy of Morals, Martin Buber?s I and Thou, and view a movie: Woody Allen?s Crimes and Misdemeanors.

Section: GRN
Registration Number: 21398
Instructor: Green,Alexander
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Clemen 708 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

JDS 199SEM - Human and Animal

The course will examine various depictions of human-animal relationship in Western literature and culture, from classical times to modern times. By looking at these texts, we will chart the emergence of a figure that occupies a borderline state between human and animal, and explore its implications for our understanding of Jewish and Christian relationships as well as human and animal nature. Readings include: Ovid, Marie de France, Hobbes, Shakespeare, Heine, Baudelaire, Tolstoy, Nietzsche, Kafka, and more.

Section: PIN
Registration Number: 20839
Instructor: Pines,Noam
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Clemen 708 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 25

LAI 199SEM - Info Overload Edu in 21st Cent

Information Overload: Education in 21st Century Learning Environments: Teaching and learning are more challenging today than 100 or even 20 years ago. In every discipline, there is more information to sort through, both because more information is being produced by a growing population, but also because it is more widely available. Everyone must learn to cope with and ideally, thrive, in this information-rich environment. The implications of ?information overload? for the developing learner are especially critical to understand. In this course we will explore how 21st century learning environments tax our attentional resources and what strategies are most effective for successful learning and interactions. You will learn practical skills such as effective note-taking and time management in the college setting. We will also examine contemporary issues such as technology and attention, the role of movement and exercise in learning and development, how cognition is embedded in our social selves, how stress affects our cognitive processes, how cultural differences are reflected in cognition, the goal of schooling and assessment, and how educational policies can be created and improved, based on research.

Section: A
Registration Number: 22541
Instructor: Cameron,Claire E
Schedule: MW 1:00pm - 2:20pm
Location: Capen 108 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 23

LIN 199SEM - Words We Can Live By: Etymolog

Word we Can Live By: Etymology and Onomastics, The Study Word Histories and Names: Words, the building blocks of everything we think and communicate, change over time. They live and die. They have their own personal histories, reflecting changes in interpretation, cultural attitudes and interaction, surprising relationships, and fascinating innovations. In this seminar we will investigate the processes of changes in word form and lexcial meaning, how different cultures mutually influence and contribute to their vocabularies, and how members of a society create new words, not only out of necessity, but also out of pure delight.

Section: B
Registration Number: 20727
Instructor: Hoeing,Robert G
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 6

LIN 199SEM - What Makes Us Talk?

What Makes Us Talk? Looking into the nature of the human ability to speak: There are currently seven billion people who talk. That is a lot of chatter! Humans use between 4,000 and distinct 6,000 distinct languages to produce all this chatter. But they have all learned effortlessly to talk in the language of the community they were born in, irrespective of their differences in culture, history, socio-economic circumstances, or education. What explains this uniquely human ability to learn and speak any language we are exposed to as babies and children? Over the last 50 years, as we have learned more and more about the nature of human languages, two tentative explanations have been put forth. One assumes a language instinct: We are born with some language-specific abilities to learn without explicit instruction the language spoken around us. The other assumes that language learning is based on generalization from individual experiences and some rather simple and general learning procedures. In this seminar, we will read two general audience books written 20 years apart that detail the evidence for both hypotheses. Through investigating the pros and cons for both hypotheses, by the end of the class students will have a basic grasp of what makes up our uniquely human cognitive ability to learn and speak any language we are exposed to. They will also understand about the role of controversy in science. Finally, because the most recent book has lead to a lot controversy both in academic venues and on blogs,they will be aware of different argumentative styles and ?genres? of discourse.

Section: C
Registration Number: 23575
Instructor: Koenig,Jean-Pierre A.
Schedule: TR 5:00pm - 6:20pm
Location: Clemen 102 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 13

MGF 199SEM - Contraband Economics

This is an economics based course focusing on the global illicit economy. This course focuses on the underside of globalization and efforts to police illegal markets. The course introduces students to key sectors of the global underworld: the trade in prohibited commodities (drugs such as cocaine and heroin), the smuggling of legal commodities (such as arms), the black market in stolen commodities (such as intellectual property), and the trafficking of bodies and body parts. The course compares these illicit economic activities across time and place and their relationship to the licit economy, and critically evaluates the practice and politics of regulatory efforts.

Section: F1F
Registration Number: 21084
Instructor: Miller,Douglas Jan
Schedule: MW 5:00pm - 6:20pm
Location: Alfier 103 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Social Respblity

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is when management decides to "do good for society". In other words, companies use some of their profits towards initiatives that benefit society. Some initiatives that are focused on include improving the environment, donating to charities (locally & nationally), and assisting community programs. These Corporate Social Responsibility actions obviously benefit our society. But, they also benefit corporations as more and more customers expect companies to act socially responsible. Satisfied customers can often mean more profit. We will examine specific examples of CSR. What has been successful? What has been unsuccessful? We will also debate why companies participate in CSR. Is it more socially-oriented or profit-oriented? Does that really matter as long as our communities and our world benefit? Furthermore, we will discuss social responsibility on an individual basis and how you can improve our society as a student, right now. In addition, this course will help freshmen students make the transition to higher education. College-level skills, including oral and written communication, study skills, time management, and library skills will be emphasized. These critical skills will help ensure the success of students during their freshman year, as well as their entire college career. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: A
Registration Number: 20695
Instructor: Grossman,Debora M
Schedule: WF 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Talbrt 107 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 22

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Finance

Is Greed Good? Gordon Gekko, played by Michael Douglas in the 1987 movie Wall Street, tells us that "greed, for lack of a better word, is good. Greed is right, greed works." But should corporations really be concerned only with shareholder wealth maximization, or do they need to take into account a larger group of stakeholders? Do managers have the right to make moral decisions on behalf of shareholders? Do firms have a moral responsibility to pay a "fair" amount of taxes? Are corporate social responsibility and profit maximization really incompatible? These are some of the questions we will try to answer in this freshmen seminar. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: A2
Registration Number: 20697
Instructor: Fotak,Veljko N
Schedule: T 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Location: Jacobs B32 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 7

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Finance

Is Greed Good? Gordon Gekko, played by Michael Douglas in the 1987 movie Wall Street, tells us that "greed, for lack of a better word, is good. Greed is right, greed works." But should corporations really be concerned only with shareholder wealth maximization, or do they need to take into account a larger group of stakeholders? Do managers have the right to make moral decisions on behalf of shareholders? Do firms have a moral responsibility to pay a "fair" amount of taxes? Are corporate social responsibility and profit maximization really incompatible? These are some of the questions we will try to answer in this freshmen seminar. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: A3
Registration Number: 20698
Instructor: Fotak,Veljko N
Schedule: T 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Jacobs B32 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 15

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Social Respblity

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is when management decides to "do good for society". In other words, companies use some of their profits towards initiatives that benefit society. Some initiatives that are focused on include improving the environment, donating to charities (locally & nationally), and assisting community programs. These Corporate Social Responsibility actions obviously benefit our society. But, they also benefit corporations as more and more customers expect companies to act socially responsible. Satisfied customers can often mean more profit. We will examine specific examples of CSR. What has been successful? What has been unsuccessful? We will also debate why companies participate in CSR. Is it more socially-oriented or profit-oriented? Does that really matter as long as our communities and our world benefit? Furthermore, we will discuss social responsibility on an individual basis and how you can improve our society as a student, right now. In addition, this course will help freshmen students make the transition to higher education. College-level skills, including oral and written communication, study skills, time management, and library skills will be emphasized. These critical skills will help ensure the success of students during their freshman year, as well as their entire college career. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: B
Registration Number: 20700
Instructor: Grossman,Debora M
Schedule: WF 8:00am - 8:50am
Location: Knox 109 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 83

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Marketing

Marketing-Nomics: The Stranger than Fiction "Reality" of People and Products. Why do people buy more Squid when it's not referred to as Squid but instead Calamari? Why is a Credit Card Surcharge illegal in some states but a Cash Discount legal, when they are the exact same thing? Can how a simple form is worded affect such things as important as Organ Donation giving rates? Can the price of water and wine influence how good it tastes? Why are diamonds the gem of choice for engagement and wedding rings? Why do we really buy brands? These questions and more will be addressed in this freshman seminar. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: B2
Registration Number: 20702
Instructor: Krupski,Michael Dennis
Schedule: M 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Jacobs B32 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 17

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:MIS

Answering with Analytics. How do you support or take down claims about a baseball player?s performance in a given season? What goes into making a good recommendation system, be it for shopping online or browsing movies? Can Internet search patterns tell us something about the state of the world? How does data on a tennis player?s popularity, play schedule and social media chatter help power computing infrastructure planning? How do you stop suspicious cars at border crossings? How do airlines decide how many tickets to sell at each price for a flight? Learn how analytics can help answer such questions. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: B3
Registration Number: 20703
Instructor: Basile,Jennifer Lynn
Schedule: M 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Jacobs B34 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 21

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:MIS

Answering with Analytics. How do you support or take down claims about a baseball player?s performance in a given season? What goes into making a good recommendation system, be it for shopping online or browsing movies? Can Internet search patterns tell us something about the state of the world? How does data on a tennis player?s popularity, play schedule and social media chatter help power computing infrastructure planning? How do you stop suspicious cars at border crossings? How do airlines decide how many tickets to sell at each price for a flight? Learn how analytics can help answer such questions. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: B4
Registration Number: 20704
Instructor: Basile,Jennifer Lynn
Schedule: M 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Jacobs B34 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 24

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Org Beh

Happy and Productive: Getting Ready to Enter the 21st Century Work-Force. Why are some employees happier than others? Why are some leaders able to get their subordinates to work harder whereas other subordinates sabotage their leaders? How can companies remain innovative and at the same time be efficient? How should one learn and network so that they can be successful? Why is Google so innovative where as Microsoft is not? When is working in teams a drag and what can one do to make it a better experience? The purpose of this seminar is to identify and answer such important questions as one seeks to become a part of the work force. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: B5
Registration Number: 20706
Instructor: Treadway,Darren
Schedule: T 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Jacobs B30 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 21

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Social Respblity

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is when management decides to "do good for society". In other words, companies use some of their profits towards initiatives that benefit society. Some initiatives that are focused on include improving the environment, donating to charities (locally & nationally), and assisting community programs. These Corporate Social Responsibility actions obviously benefit our society. But, they also benefit corporations as more and more customers expect companies to act socially responsible. Satisfied customers can often mean more profit. We will examine specific examples of CSR. What has been successful? What has been unsuccessful? We will also debate why companies participate in CSR. Is it more socially-oriented or profit-oriented? Does that really matter as long as our communities and our world benefit? Furthermore, we will discuss social responsibility on an individual basis and how you can improve our society as a student, right now. In addition, this course will help freshmen students make the transition to higher education. College-level skills, including oral and written communication, study skills, time management, and library skills will be emphasized. These critical skills will help ensure the success of students during their freshman year, as well as their entire college career. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: C
Registration Number: 20705
Instructor: Grossman,Debora M
Schedule: WF 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Hoch 114 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 59

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:MIS

Answering with Analytics. How do you support or take down claims about a baseball players performance in a given season? What goes into making a good recommendation system, be it for shopping online or browsing movies? Can Internet search patterns tell us something about the state of the world? How does data on a tennis player?s popularity, play schedule and social media chatter help power computing infrastructure planning? How do you stop suspicious cars at border crossings? How do airlines decide how many tickets to sell at each price for a flight? Learn how analytics can help answer such questions. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: C1
Registration Number: 20707
Instructor: Basile,Jennifer Lynn
Schedule: M 5:00pm - 5:50pm
Location: Jacobs B34 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 20

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Org Beh

Happy and Productive: Getting Ready to Enter the 21st Century Work-Force. Why are some employees happier than others? Why are some leaders able to get their subordinates to work harder whereas other subordinates sabotage their leaders? How can companies remain innovative and at the same time be efficient? How should one learn and network so that they can be successful? Why is Google so innovative where as Microsoft is not? When is working in teams a drag and what can one do to make it a better experience? The purpose of this seminar is to identify and answer such important questions as one seeks to become a part of the work force. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: C2
Registration Number: 20708
Instructor: Treadway,Darren
Schedule: T 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Jacobs B30 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 15

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Org Beh

Happy and Productive: Getting Ready to Enter the 21st Century Work-Force. Why are some employees happier than others? Why are some leaders able to get their subordinates to work harder whereas other subordinates sabotage their leaders? How can companies remain innovative and at the same time be efficient? How should one learn and network so that they can be successful? Why is Google so innovative where as Microsoft is not? When is working in teams a drag and what can one do to make it a better experience? The purpose of this seminar is to identify and answer such important questions as one seeks to become a part of the work force. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: C3
Registration Number: 20709
Instructor: Treadway,Darren
Schedule: T 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Jacobs B30 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 16

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Accounting

Section: C5
Registration Number: 23881
Instructor: Hu,Rose M
Schedule: M 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Jacobs 214 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Social Respblity

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is when management decides to "do good for society". In other words, companies use some of their profits towards initiatives that benefit society. Some initiatives that are focused on include improving the environment, donating to charities (locally & nationally), and assisting community programs. These Corporate Social Responsibility actions obviously benefit our society. But, they also benefit corporations as more and more customers expect companies to act socially responsible. Satisfied customers can often mean more profit. We will examine specific examples of CSR. What has been successful? What has been unsuccessful? We will also debate why companies participate in CSR. Is it more socially-oriented or profit-oriented? Does that really matter as long as our communities and our world benefit? Furthermore, we will discuss social responsibility on an individual basis and how you can improve our society as a student, right now. In addition, this course will help freshmen students make the transition to higher education. College-level skills, including oral and written communication, study skills, time management, and library skills will be emphasized. These critical skills will help ensure the success of students during their freshman year, as well as their entire college career. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: D
Registration Number: 20710
Instructor: Grossman,Debora M
Schedule: WF 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Knox 109 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 58

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Org Beh

Happy and Productive: Getting Ready to Enter the 21st Century Work-Force. Why are some employees happier than others? Why are some leaders able to get their subordinates to work harder whereas other subordinates sabotage their leaders? How can companies remain innovative and at the same time be efficient? How should one learn and network so that they can be successful? Why is Google so innovative where as Microsoft is not? When is working in teams a drag and what can one do to make it a better experience? The purpose of this seminar is to identify and answer such important questions as one seeks to become a part of the work force. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: D1
Registration Number: 20711
Instructor: Treadway,Darren
Schedule: M 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Jacobs B32 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 9

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Org Beh

Happy and Productive: Getting Ready to Enter the 21st Century Work-Force. Why are some employees happier than others? Why are some leaders able to get their subordinates to work harder whereas other subordinates sabotage their leaders? How can companies remain innovative and at the same time be efficient? How should one learn and network so that they can be successful? Why is Google so innovative where as Microsoft is not? When is working in teams a drag and what can one do to make it a better experience? The purpose of this seminar is to identify and answer such important questions as one seeks to become a part of the work force. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: D2
Registration Number: 20712
Instructor: Treadway,Darren
Schedule: W 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Capen 110 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 25

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Org Beh

Happy and Productive: Getting Ready to Enter the 21st Century Work-Force. Why are some employees happier than others? Why are some leaders able to get their subordinates to work harder whereas other subordinates sabotage their leaders? How can companies remain innovative and at the same time be efficient? How should one learn and network so that they can be successful? Why is Google so innovative where as Microsoft is not? When is working in teams a drag and what can one do to make it a better experience? The purpose of this seminar is to identify and answer such important questions as one seeks to become a part of the work force. This is the recitation for companion twice weekly lecture.

Section: D3
Registration Number: 20713
Instructor: Treadway,Darren
Schedule: T 12:00pm - 12:50pm
Location: Jacobs B32 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 20

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Accounting

Section: D4
Registration Number: 23879
Instructor: Hu,Rose M
Schedule: M 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Location: Jacobs B34 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 4

MUS 199SEM - Exploding Piano

The Exploding Piano - The piano has long been regarded as a laboratory for musical experimentation and the last 100 years have been notable for the degree to which musicians and artists of all kinds have felt free to experiment. This course seeks to examine some of the big musical innovations of the 20th and 21st centuries as reflected in the piano music of the time. Each course meeting consists of a mix of lecture and listening with some examples performed live in class. The course strives to broaden students understanding of modern music and emphasizes critical listening, reading and writing.

Section: HUE
Registration Number: 21081
Instructor: Huebner,Eric H
Schedule: M 2:00pm - 4:30pm
Location: Baird 327 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 19

MUS 199SEM - On Edge: Practice Performing

On the Edge: A course to Practice Performing A course designed for the performer as a practical method to bridge the gap between the studio and the stage. Performers will concentrate on strengthening performance skills, building a strong stage presence, and increasing confidence and awareness in an effort to reach "peak" performance. Note that performance here includes many different categories of activity the class is not simply for performers such actors, musicians and dancers, but welcomes everyone, since we are all called upon to perform, whether in public speaking, presentation and leadership in the workplace, as part of our civic responsibilities as citizens of a democracy, in advocative and interpersonal roles of every kind. Taught in intensive two or three-hour segments, classes are small with a maximum of twenty-five students. Participants perform in every class building to the final public concert.

Section: KOP
Registration Number: 21082
Instructor: Kopperud,Jean K
Schedule: TR 5:00pm - 6:20pm
Location: Baird 250 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 23

MUS 199SEM - Electronics & Computers In Mus

Electronics and Computers in Music This course is intended as an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of music involving electronics and computers. The rich and unique influence of technology on music, past, present, and future, will be discussed. We will study the pioneers who developed the majority of techniques used today in popular music. These pioneers include experimental and avant-garde composers of the 20th century, sound engineers, instrument builders, and inventors. We will listen to and discuss experimental, pop, rock, DJ, drum and bass, house, techno, mashups, dubstep, remixes, EDM, and other music sub-genres. We will examine electronic music techniques and discuss the strong relationship that exists between technology (tools) and these techniques. In addition, we will explore basic acoustic and psychoacoustics principles pertaining to music. By the end of the semester students should be capable of informed critical listening to music they regularly enjoy, having gained a deeper historical perspective and technical/auditory understanding of how music is created today. On a practical level, students will have the opportunity to experiment with and create small musical studies using the most significant techniques of electronic music: sampling, synthesis, sound processing, and mixing. No previous musical experience/knowledge is necessary, but by the end of the semester, students will have demonstrated an understanding of electronic and computer music and the creative processes inherent therein.

Section: LIP
Registration Number: 21080
Instructor: Lippe,Cort
Schedule: TR 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Location: Baird B33 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 10

MUS 199SEM - Open Ears, Open Minds

?OPEN EARS, OPEN MINDS? is a listening and discussion-based class that explores the way indie rock and indie pop music intersect with classical new music (music composed within the last 50 years). Each week will feature a new classical work juxtaposed with a piece of popular music with the intention of drawinf parallels between the two seemingly disparate worlds. Through weekly listening and writing assignments, students will learn to open their minds and ears to a variety of sound worlds. By cultivating critical listeners who are willing to explore challenging sounds and dismiss genre barriers, the hope is that students will apply this openness of thinking to their academic journey and beyond.

Section: MOS
Registration Number: 22740
Instructor: Moseley,Brian C
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Baird 318 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 17

MUS 199SEM - Frank Zappa, Media Bias

Frank Zappa, Media Bias & Censorship The purpose of this course is to explore issues of media bias and censorship in modern American society through the life and work of Frank Zappa. As a musician, Zappa was internationally recognized for composing and performing his own unique genre of music. He also garnered attention from political movements and media outlets for his writings and statements about bias and censorship. This course will survey a thorough body of Zappa's work. Students will examine and analyze song lyrics, along with political trends in media and government that existed concurrently to Zappa's career.

Section: NEL
Registration Number: 21094
Instructor: Nelson,Jon R.
Schedule: MW 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Location: Baird 211 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 26

PHI 199SEM - Science and Religion

In this course we will examine a variety of questions about the relationship between science and religion. Some religious believers argue that existing scientific evidence supports their perspective, while others say that science undermines religion. Still others claim that science and religion exist in separate spheres and thus neither support nor disconfirm one another. In addition to examining some of these broad theories about the relationship between science and religion, we will look at the following specific areas of science and ask what (if anything) they tell us about core religious beliefs: Big Bang cosmology, scientific theories of the origins of life, evolutionary theory, and the psychological study of religion. Students will gain experience in constructing and evaluating arguments for and against controversial positions.

Section: BEE
Registration Number: 23648
Instructor: Beebe,James R
Schedule: MWF 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Bell 138 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 11

PHI 199SEM - Philosophy in Literature

Literary works often deal with important philosophical issues. For example, many narratives are structured around underlying ethical distinctions between good and bad actions or between good and bad character traits. In addition, many narratives raise questions about human nature or the structure of the world in which we live and act. The purpose of this class is to consider how a general philosophical issue might be investigated through a work of literature. We will read both philosophy texts and literary texts, using the philosophy texts first for a basis understanding of a particular issues and then comparing the treatment of that philosophical issue in a selection of literary works. We focus initially on questions of human freedom. What does it mean for human beings to be free to direct their lives and choose to commit, or refrain from committing, particular actions? Is the world structured in a way that allows for human freedom? Is freedom a requirement for moral responsibility? The second half of the course focuses on ethical issues. What sorts of actions are morally permissible? What sorts of actions are morally impermissible? What sorts of habits or personality traits characterize morally virtuous people? What sorts of habits or personality traits characterize morally degenerate people? How, generally, should we live? What are the attributes of a good life? Particular philosophical texts used in the course include selections from Aristotle, Epictetus, Boethius, Kant, and Bentham. Literary readings include works of Sophocles, Henry James, David Thoreau, and Benjamin Franklin.

Section: DON
Registration Number: 20923
Instructor: Donnelly,Maureen
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Park 143 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 24

PHI 199SEM - Moral, Real, and Mean of TV

Morality, Reality, and the Meaning of Life in TV and Popular Films: Contemporary television programs and films often involve the same issues, questions and probing reflections that philosophers have explored since the time of Plato: How do we know what is a morally right action? How do we know whether something is real, or only a dream or illusion? Is there more to reality that what we can experience with our senses? Do individuals have a purpose or destiny as a result of external conditions or forces, or is this a matter for individuals themselves to decide? Bringing together pop culture and philosophy is beneficial to both sides. Stories told with skill and imagination in popular culture provide compelling illustrations of ideas treated abstractly and systematically by philosophers. Connecting popular culture with the concepts developed by philosophers makes the concepts seem less abstract, more real. At the same time, by showing the presence of profound conceptual content in the works of pop culture, we will take these works more seriously?as more than mere entertainment. Often, the best of pop culture provides explorations that take philosophical ideas to unexpected levels, and so provide fresh stimulus for deeper philosophical reflection. Bringing together some of the most prominent works in contemporary popular culture with relevant classical texts from the history of philosophy is both entertaining and intellectually fruitful. The course will examine episodes from the TV series, The Simpsons and Buffy the Vampire Slayer, as well as the films, Crimes and Misdemeanors, The Matrix, and Avatar. Course text: James Lawler, The God Tube: The Hidden Spiritual Message in Pop Culture (Chicago: Open Court Publishers, 2010).

Section: LAW
Registration Number: 20922
Instructor: Lawler,James M
Schedule: MWF 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Talbrt 103 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

PHY 199SEM - The Physics of How Things Work

Title: How things work. The topic is: science basis of modern everyday devices. PHY 199 will examine the principles behind the operation of familiar devices which we use every day such as the car, the laser, radio and television etc. The course will also examine the story of the discovery of these principles as well as the development of useful devices based on them. The discovery stories contain both heroes and villains and telling them will shed light on ethical issues associated with science and technology. The course will also discuss the changes brought to societies by the use of new technology, the problems that these technologies solve and the new ones that emerge from their use.

Section: PET
Registration Number: 21083
Instructor: Petrou,Athos
Schedule: MWF 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Frnczk 341 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 12

PSC 199SEM - Making Sense of 2016 Pre Elec

What explains the result of the 2016 U.S. presidential election? How can we make sense of a campaign that started long before this Novembers election, beginning with each party's nomination process and culminating with more than 120 million votes cast? How did we get here, with this particular set of candidates and issues at the forefront among the hundreds of other potential candidates and issues? How do candidates, voters, outside groups, and the media navigate the increasingly complex rules that regulate, among other things, campaign finance and voting rights? What can we learn from previous elections that helps us understand the current contest? How did our understanding of campaigns change over the last half century? This course will consider these questions by introducing students to the political science literature on U.S. presidential elections

Section: YOS
Registration Number: 20973
Instructor: Yoshinaka,Antoine Isao
Schedule: TR 5:00pm - 6:20pm
Location: Park 143 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 9

RLL 199SEM - Global Perspectives

This course is affiliated with The Academies. It features experiential learning and may include field trips, guest speakers and mentored exploration. The globalized world presents a unique set of challenges to people who aspire to make well informed choices and act ethically. The dynamic space of globalization is one in which the reliability of information is constantly called into question, and our choices can have consequences for people in far away places whom we will never meet. In the broadest possible terms, the objective of this course is to help students think through how to be the people that they want to be in the context of globalization. In order to achieve that objective, students will pursue a series of readings that contextualize the workings of globalization. Armed with that information, we will take on a series of topics that we'll call "the forces of globalization"--the things that make the world go round. For each topic, in the manner of a case study, we'll consider a challenge presented to the global community and a person or entity that is responding to that challenge. For each individual or organization that we consider, we'll look at opportunities for volunteer work, internships, or employment that an interested person could pursue in the mid to long term.

Section: CUL
Registration Number: 21110
Instructor: Culleton,Colleen
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Park 143 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 18

RLL 199SEM - Rep. of Smoking and Smoker

The goal of the class is to identify and evaluate the image of tobacco and the tobacco user in representative selections from the literary, cinematic, and artistic traditions of French-, Italian-, and Spanish-speaking countries. In particular we will seek to trace how that image has evolved since the introduction of tobacco to Europe. Given its evolution and impact, tobacco use must be understood in a broad historical and social context; the course will therefore take into account economic and political factors as well as public health issues.

Section: JAM
Registration Number: 21027
Instructor: Jameson,Maureen
Schedule: MWF 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Clemen 218 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 17

RLL 199SEM - Modern Visionaries & Outcasts

For visionaries such as the ?cursed poets? and Friedrich Nietzsche modernity involved embracing provocative, sometimes scandalous affirmations that broke free from traditional norms, values, and ideals. They were often considered outcasts or even ?mad,? but these visionaries realized that these values were crumbling. The 20th century continued this creative ?anti-tradition? in various striking stories that emerged across disciplines, in philosophy, psychology, feminism, literature, and in the arts, which expanded with the birth of photography and film. We will discover challenging ideas and consider their relevance to our own present by reading modern masterpieces of literature, psychoanalytic and philosophical texts, but also by engaging with other art forms that take us to the screen, art galleries, concert halls, and urban spaces. The course especially emphasizes some of the most astonishing critiques and creative propositions from diverse world regions closely related to the American context, including Brazil, Cuba, France, Haiti, and Mexico.

Section: NEG
Registration Number: 24417
Instructor: Negrete,Maria Fernanda
Schedule: TR 8:00am - 9:20am
Location: Capen 110 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 21

SSC 199SEM - Framing Dig Iden Age of Google

This course will introduce students to the impact and opportunities available to them as global citizens in an online, participatory culture. Students will begin crafting their digital identity through the use of their social media accounts and the UB ePortfolio. Students will explore a research topic of interest to them and follow it from rough idea to published online Wikipedia article; thus, building their ?brand? as researcher. Throughout the course students will work in thematic, discipline-related teams to construct a group project using digital media that critically exams a major current event. Underpinning this course will be the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education: Authority Is Constructed and Contextual, Information Creation as a Process, Information Has Value, Research as Inquiry, Scholarship as Conversation, and Searching as Strategic Exploration.

Section: TYS
Registration Number: 24083
Instructor: Tysick,Cynthia A
Schedule: TR 8:00am - 9:20am
Location: Norton 209 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 27

TH 199SEM - Let's See

How do we process everyday 'visuals' from phone apps to deciding what to wear or where to eat? Who decides (designs) the impact of what we see? How do they do that? We don't usually think of seeing as something we need to learn to do. Like the acquisition of spoken language, we tend to take seeing for granted, and yet, just as in spoken and written language, there is a visual language with its own hierarchies and grammar. That language is used by theatre designers, directors, actors, and choreographers, as well as by film-makers and artists. This course will investigate looking and seeing as foundations of design. How do we process looking? WE will practice seeing by collecting images, looking to find the right questions. We will apply seeing to our own design experiments. Along the way we will investigate text as a threshold to design, think about visual storytelling, and work to embrace ambiguity. We might even make a snow globe. In the process of discovering and articulating ways to look and see, the course will introduce essential skills for success in college: Critical thinking, text analysis, time management, problem solving, written and verbal proficiency, synthesizing ideas, and ethical issues in design.

Section: CN
Registration Number: 23933
Instructor: Norgren,Catherine F.
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Capen 110 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 10

TH 199SEM -

The popularity of IMAX, 3D films and television, and earth-shaking home and theatre sound systems has raised audience members? expectations for the sensory impact of their viewing experience. This course will investigate how theatre, the world?s oldest live mimetic form, first experimented with sensory stimulation and overload through avant- garde theatre performances starting in the early 20th century, and continues to compete with film in this arena by coupling found and environmental spaces with a ?liveness? that other media cannot provide.

Section: EL
Registration Number: 23932
Instructor: Laine,Eero Philbrook
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Frnczk 408 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 27