Fall 2017: Open UB Seminar Courses (3-credit)

The following are approved 3-credit UB Seminar courses for Fall 2017 with open seats. Incoming first-year and transfer students with less than 45 domestic credits will take a 3-credit UB Seminar. 

Registration Reminder

Before registering, browse all UB Seminar options and ensure you have found your final choice. After enrolling, you will be unable to make a change in your selection. 

AAS 199SEM - The American Image:Art, Media

How do images affect culture, society, and identity in America? As Americans, how do we sort out whom we are, while constantly bombarded with images and symbols telling us who we should be? These are a few of the questions we will explore in this cross-cultural course on American diversity. Investigating the roles of race, class, religion, gender, and sexuality in the world of images. Throughout the semester, we will pay particular attention to visual mediums such as art, television, movies, printed images, and a host of cultural symbols affecting us everyday. Readings and other course materials are interdisciplinary, including anthropological and historical perspectives, documentary films, literary material, and most of all, art.

Section: NEZ1
Registration Number: 22281
Instructor: Zarragoitia,Nestor E
Schedule: MWF 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Clemen 206 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

AAS 199SEM - The African American Artist

From their earliest arrival in the American colonies until current times, African American artists have strived to establish their artistic traditions, while at the same time grappling with their historical social, economic, and political statuses in society. This course will explore that journey, including their struggles for self-identity in an art world whose traditions are rooted in disparity. This class will focus on different eras, art movements, and the lives and works of key artists that define this vision. We will examine the overall impacts of the African Diaspora on artistic expression, and the interwoven social issues confronting each generation.

Section: NEZ2
Registration Number: 22282
Instructor: Zarragoitia,Nestor E
Schedule: MWF 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Clemen 103 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 9

AAS 199SEM - Afri Amer and the City:19th Ce

This seminar explores the social, political, and economic development, as well as the transformation of African American urban experiences from the early 19th century through the 20th century. Emphases will be placed on the social conditions of urban life, the impact of economic policies, geographical location, labor, migration, family and institutional development, and responses to new forms of social control. The course explores the relationship between racial identification and community formation, and assesses the impact of notions of community and community solidarity. It also examines the impact of class and gender on community formation and how communities evolve over time as populations, the economy, and government policies and change in a climate of disinvestment and reinvestment.

Section: WIL
Registration Number: 23510
Instructor: Williams,Lillian S
Schedule: R 1:00pm - 3:40pm
Location: Talbrt 103 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

AHI 199SEM - Conceptual Art

Section: GN
Registration Number: 24701
Instructor: Nickard,Gary L.
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Filmor 328 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 5

AHI 199SEM - Queer and Feminist Art

Each week we will explore a specific work of art that A) was made after 1945 and B) has been read through feminist and/or queer interpretive models. Pairing each work of art with at least two pieces of critical writing, our task will be to understand the different kinds of interpretation offered. How do early approaches to theorizing art after modernism differ from later approaches rooted in social politics? How do interpretations of art influenced by different social theories differ from one another?

Section: TT
Registration Number: 21593
Instructor: Triandos,Theodoros I
Schedule: M 6:30pm - 9:10pm
Location: Capen 260 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 5

AMS 199SEM - New Comers:The Caribbean Ameri

The New Comers is a multi-disciplinary course which explores the urban experiences of the United States largest Latino immigrants including Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, Cubans and compare their experiences with those of West Indians from Jamaica and Barbados. The course will draw on the methodology of documentary, history, sociology, and economics to examine this topic. We will further explore the socio-cultural, economic experiences and identity formation of these immigrant groups in the United States.

Section: CEN2
Registration Number: 22283
Instructor: Centrie,Craig G
Schedule: TR 5:00pm - 6:20pm
Location: Talbrt 111 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 10

AMS 199SEM - New World Imaginaries

What is the "New World" and what place does it hold in the cultural imagination of the United States? How have ideas about the "New World" been developed and reinforced? And what are the consequences, in the past as well as the present, of imagining that the Americas were a "New World"? This course explores the notion that the "New World" is a concept that was socially constructed, that this concept has had wide-ranging consequences for the development of the United States, and that our understandings (and misunderstandings) of Native American peoples and tribal nations are closely tied to the ways that the "New World" was imagined in the past and continues to be conceptualized in contemporary US society.

Section: GRI
Registration Number: 23236
Instructor: Grinde,Donald
Schedule: TR 1:30pm - 2:50pm
Location: Baldy 110 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 4

APY 199SEM - At Home in Europe:Anth Persp

Europe is an area of the world facing many challenges right now, with issues of immigration attracting much attention, in addition to the aftermath of the so-called Brexit vote in the UK to leave the European Union. One theme that draws upon several areas of research in Europe is that of what it means to belong in a society, and what does it mean to be at home? Is home connected to a building or a place? Is it connected to what you do, or where you live? In what ways is tied to emotion? In this UB Seminar we think about the meanings of home in European societies and for people living in Europe. We will look at such topics as the concepts of home and homeland, homelessness, refugees and migrants, and the role of the European Union in ideas of belonging and feeling at home in Europe. You are encouraged to think comparatively and cross-culturally about ideas of home.

Section: RDA
Registration Number: 21786
Instructor: Reed-Danahay,Deborah E.
Schedule: W 2:00pm - 4:40pm
Location: Filmor 354 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 12

ART 199SEM - The Artists Journey

Section: JO
Registration Number: 24771
Instructor: Opera,John M
Schedule: TR 5:00pm - 6:20pm
Location: Cfa 118 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 13

CL 199SEM - Seven Wond of Ancient World

Section: 4
Registration Number: 24862
Instructor: Unknown
Schedule: MWF 12:00pm - 12:50pm
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

CL 199SEM - The Ancient World in the Movie

This course will explore the representation of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds in modern cinema, focusing on films made between 1960 and the present. We will pay attention not only to what these films show us about modern attitudes toward the ancient world, but also to how modern filmmakers use these films, set in antiquity, to talk about our modern world. Students will explore works of literature, ancient and modern, that offer our discussions rich context and further into how narratives reflect and shape cultural values.

Section: MCG
Registration Number: 21966
Instructor: McGuire,Donald T.
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Filmor 325 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 3

COL 199SEM - On Dignity and Death

What is dignity? What is the relationship of dignity to what Victor Hugo calls the inviolability of life, but also and no less trenchantly to both the death penalty and the right to die? How does the concept of dignity work both to defend and to challenge both the death penalty and the right to die? On Dignity and Death explores these questions through readings of philosophy (Cicero, Kant, Hegel, Foucault), criminology (Beccaria), legal and medical accounts (Dworkin, Cohen-Almagor), literature (Hugo, Camus, Capote, Mailer), and abolitionists (Badinter, Prejean). We will also read the Universal Declaration of Universal Human Rights (1948) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (proposed 1966, ratified 1976) in order to examine the paradox of a universal human right to life that coexists with the death penalty. In addition, we will read several United States Supreme Court decisions concerning both the States right to put to death and its right to make live.

Section: DJ
Registration Number: 21594
Instructor: Johnson,David E.
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Clemen 204 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

COL 199SEM - Telling Stories

Although it plays different roles in different cultures and different historical moments, storytelling seems to be a universal human activity. Children want the same stories to be told over and over again in exactly the same manner. As adults, we enjoy stories in literature, film, videos, or computer games. We listen to the stories of friends and family members. Historians, anthropologists and sociologists both research and construct their own stories in order to make sense of human cultures, traditions, laws and religions. Different kind of stories, such as testimonies and eyewitness accounts, are at work in legal trials. Patient stories are important for social workers, psychologists and doctors. Storytelling has invaded even neuroscience and medicine, for example in Kleinman, The Illness Narratives. Some philosophers argue that foundational stories of a given culture teach us about love, moral values, and good life. In this interdisciplinary seminar we will examine stories in literature, folklore, film, anthropology and history, as well as significant stories in your own lives, in order to ask fundamental questions: why do people tell stories? What kind of knowledge and wisdom is conveyed through stories? How are stories related to power and politics? What can story teach you that science cannot? And what counts as a story? How is it constructed? What is the difference between fictional stories and real stories, such as documentaries or history? Our readings will include stories from the Bible-- for example, the story of Isaac and Abraham-- and their subsequently pictorial and philosophical retellings; selected fairytales such as Beauty and the Beast and their film versions, short stories by diverse literary writers, such as Melville, Larsen, Kafka and Dinesen; films, for example the BBC film production of Shakespeare?s Hamlet; legal accounts, selected stories told by anthropologists, for example Carol Stack, All Our Kin, as well as some of the most interesting reflections by historians and literary critics on the role of storytelling in human culture. Students will also be asked to share the most important stories they learned during their first year colloquium and to reflect on the role of sharing stories through social media.

Section: EZ
Registration Number: 23357
Instructor: Ziarek,Ewa Plonowska
Schedule: MW 3:30pm - 4:50pm
Location: Bell 138 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

COL 199SEM - Quarrel Between Philo & Lit

Why do philosophers read poets, and why do poets read philosophy? The course will trace the history of this question, beginning with the ?quarrel? between philosophy and poetry in antiquity and leading up to the contemporary conversations and polemics between the two disciplines. This quarrel between philosophy and poetry is mentioned in Plato, and already at that time it was perceived as ?ancient.? The course will begin by exploring the provenance and the stakes of this quarrel as seen by Plato and proceed on this basis to inquire into its formulations in later texts, from ancient Greece to 20th literature, philosophy, and film. This seminar is open to all students interested in exploring the fascinating and challenging intersections between the two main areas of the humanities: literature and philosophy. Reading literary and philosophical texts, we will discuss such questions as the nature of human existence, the problem of time, death, and finitude, the role of gender, as well as the differences and similarities between imagination and reason, passion and logic, literary language and philosophical argumentation. What is the difference between how poetry and philosophy address and express those issues? How is poetic/literary saying different from philosophical ways of telling? How do we think between poetic images and philosophical reasoning/argumentation? In the first part of the course, we will examine convergences and differences between literary and philosophical texts in antiquity (Plato, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Sophocles' tragedies), the Middle Ages (Boethius), and the Enlightenment (Voltaire). Rethinking the heritage of Greek culture and tragedy for the moderns, Nietzsche's influential study The Birth of Tragedy will serve as the transition to the questions that characterize contemporary debates between philosophy and literature. After The Birth of Tragedy, we will read essays by Heidegger and Irigaray, and a number of literary texts: short stories by Dinesen, Borges, and Faulkner, poetry by Wislawa Szymborska, Reggio?s film, Koyaanisqatsi.

Section: KZ
Registration Number: 23358
Instructor: Ziarek,Krzysztof
Schedule: MW 3:30pm - 4:50pm
Location: Norton 216 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 10

COL 199SEM - Literature and/of Human Rights

This course will explore the intersections between literature and human rights through a number of contemporary post-modern, diasporic and post-colonial works.Summary: a). Narratives of witness; b). poetics of sentiment, creating an audience; c) politics of representation / aestheticization d.) suffering of others, e.) articulation of rights. How does literature bear witness to human suffering and crimes against humanity? A prominent dimension of the novel since its inception has been the drama of human suffering and championship of the persecuted. In the 18th century, an iconic instance of this was Richardsons heroine, Clarissa; in the 19th century, the social protest novels of Charles Dickens, Mrs. Gaskell and others charted the horrors of industrialization in Victorian Britain while Zola?s Rougon-Macquart cycle did the same for the French underclasses. Across the Atlantic, a large corpus of slave narratives and novels like Uncle Toms Cabin gave momentum to the abolitionist movement which became to precursor to the contemporary discourse around human rights.

Section: SI
Registration Number: 21649
Instructor: Irlam,Shaun A.
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Capen 110 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 4

COM 199SEM - COM at the End of Life

This course is designed to examine the death and dying process from a communication perspective. We will look at end-of-life care and communication from multiple contexts to understand how crucial health, interpersonal, group, and family coordination is within the medical community.

Section: KET
Registration Number: 21903
Instructor: Tenzek,Kelly E
Schedule: MWF 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Obrian 210 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: B
Registration Number: 21754
Instructor: Regan,Kenneth W
Schedule: MW 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Knox 109 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 7

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: C
Registration Number: 21762
Instructor: Sridhar,Ramalingam
Schedule: MW 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Knox 110 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 5

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: E
Registration Number: 23656
Instructor: Regan,Kenneth W
Schedule: MW 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Nsc 210 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 20

CSE 199SR - How the Internet Works

The Internet is changing every aspect of our lives, including how we communicate, learn, navigate, organize, work, play, and love. The Internet also represents a crowning achievement of computing: a single system uniting hardware and software, theory and implementation, standards and innovation, engineering and science, protests that topple governments and stupid cat videos. This course provides an overview of how the Internet works by describing everything required to answer a single search query. Along with its technologies, we will delve into the Internet?s past and future, policy challenges, and societal implications. The course is targeted at a general audience, but because the Internet reflects contributions from many areas of computer science and computer engineering, it also provides a good overview for potential majors. Familiarity with the web and access to a personal computer are assumed, but no technical background is required. Enrollment in this course includes a lecture twice per week and your selection of a once per week recitation topic.

Section: F
Registration Number: 23655
Instructor: Regan,Kenneth W
Schedule: MW 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Nsc 215 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

DAC 199SEM - Buff Stage:Story through Arc

Every built space, whether a public building, a private residence, or a set for a play, is a performance space, in which a visual artist tells a story to an audience. This course will examine the ways in which visual artists (set designers and architects) manipulate three dimensional space, ornament, and movement to tell these stories. Using FLW?s Darwin Martin House as a point of departure (for storytelling in architecture), we will explore the language of architecture and of theatrical design as an aspect of storytelling through performance. Through research and direct observation of buffalo's architecture, students will identify story, audience, and historical context and the creative use of built space.

Section: EF
Registration Number: 22007
Instructor: Frank,Erich
Schedule: W 10:00am - 12:40pm
Location: Dfn 208 (South Campus)
Seats Available: 20

DMS 199SEM - From Screens to Screens

Open to Freshman ONLY. In todays culture, moving images circulate across platforms and screens; film, television, and video shape our lives in a variety of ways. They persuade, entertain, educate, and distract us. In this seminar, students will learn to critically analyze moving images through making. The course will introduce students to the history of media production and study with screenings and readings that highlight the range of approaches to the organization and reception of media work. The seminar is organized into practical workshops and discussions. Assignments will require students to develop their reading and writing skills in addition to learning the basic principles of documentary, narrative, and experimental filmmaking including scriptwriting, interviewing, cinematography, editing, and distribution tools.

Section: VID
Registration Number: 21796
Instructor: Sarlin,Paige H
Schedule: MW 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Cfa 286 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: I4
Registration Number: 22222
Instructor: Haggerty,Jennifer R
Schedule: F 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Bell 138 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 3

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: J
Registration Number: 22223
Instructor: Burke,Kevin M
Schedule: TR 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Nsc 216 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 3

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: K
Registration Number: 22228
Instructor: Latorre,Julia Talarico
Schedule: MW 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Alumni 97 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: K2
Registration Number: 22230
Instructor: Latorre,Julia Talarico
Schedule: T 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Talbrt 112 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Section: L3
Registration Number: 22875
Instructor: Hammond,Emily M
Schedule: T 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Capen 260 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: T
Registration Number: 22234
Instructor: Mook,D. Joseph
Schedule: TR 8:30am - 9:20am
Location: Talbrt 107 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 17

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: T2
Registration Number: 22236
Instructor: Mook,D. Joseph
Schedule: W 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Furnas 206 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: T3
Registration Number: 22237
Instructor: Mook,D. Joseph
Schedule: F 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Furnas 206 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 15

ECO 199SEM - Understanding Education Policy

What are the financial returns to a college degree? How does affirmative action impact academic achievement? What are the nonmonetary benefits of education? This course will examine these and other important questions concerning education. It will introduce the basic economic principles and critical thinking necessary to assess public policies. Students will gain an understanding of the rationale and objectives of policy interventions and ways to conduct policy evaluation. Students will also develop the basic skills and background knowledge required to assess existing institutions. A wide range of topics will be covered including financial aid, school quality, affirmative action, charter schools, standardized testing, school lunch, noncognitive skills, compulsory schooling, human capital, earnings inequality, and effects on crime, health, and families. Prior knowledge of economics is not required.

Section: RAO
Registration Number: 22292
Instructor: Rao,Neel Dattatray
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Talbrt 106 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

ELP 199SEM - Afr Amer Struggle for Equal Ed

Section: B
Registration Number: 24788
Instructor: Durand,Henry J
Schedule: R 1:00pm - 3:40pm
Location: Park 440 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

ENG 199SEM - Making Shakespeare: Case of Ha

William Shakespeare really did exist, and really did write all or most of the plays traditionally attributed to him, as well as some others which have been lost. But how did Shakespeare become Shakespeare, the quintessential author in the western literary tradition, the bane and delight of every school child today, and the continued subject of critical, philosophical, and aesthetic appreciation and reinterpretation? We can address this question through any number of Shakespeare's plays. Our proof text for this semester will be Hamlet, in the 2010 Norton Critical Edition of the play, edited by Robert Miola, which combines comparative texts from the early editions of the plays with records of performances from Edwin Booth to Jude Law, contexts from the Bible to Thomas Kyd, criticism from John Dryden to Margreta DeGrazia, and afterlives from 18th-century experimentation with the plays ending to Tom Stoppard and John Updike.

Section: BON
Registration Number: 21603
Instructor: Bono,Barbara J
Schedule: MWF 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Location: Hoch 307 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 6

ENG 199SEM - The Name is the Game: The Poet

What is the name game? In this course, we'll investigate onomastics, or names and naming, paying close attention to the peculiar nature of names and to the interesting, sometimes complicated or contested, and often strange processes by which all sorts of entities receive their names. What do names tell us of the named? Do names and the act of naming exert special power over the named, somehow helping to form or create them? Who gets to name, and who gets to use that name? Which names stick (or don't), and why? How do names change in different times and contexts? What is at stake in a name? Why do names matter? Over the semester, we'll develop insights into such questions of the poetics and politics of naming.

Section: GOL
Registration Number: 21622
Instructor: Goldman,Judith Elizabeth
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Clemen 438 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 4

ENG 199SEM - Real LIfe:Telling Stories Crea

This class teaches students how to write compelling stories drawn from real life using the form known as creative nonfiction. The essence of creative nonfiction is all in its name factual stories (non-fiction) written stylishly and well (or creatively). Creative nonfiction is especially known as a vehicle for memoirs or personal essays, but this wide-ranging term also includes a diverse number of styles that include travel writing, popular science, investigative reporting, autobiography, political opinion, magazine journalism, war writing, sports writing, current affairs, and popular science. The opportunities are endless and creativity is key.

Section: LY1
Registration Number: 21621
Instructor: Lyon,Arabella
Schedule: MWF 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

ENG 199SEM - Real LIfe:Telling Stories Crea

This class teaches students how to write compelling stories drawn from real life using the form known as creative nonfiction. The essence of creative nonfiction is all in its name factual stories (non-fiction) written stylishly and well (or creatively). Creative nonfiction is especially known as a vehicle for memoirs or personal essays, but this wide-ranging term also includes a diverse number of styles that include travel writing, popular science, investigative reporting, autobiography, political opinion, magazine journalism, war writing, sports writing, current affairs, and popular science. The opportunities are endless and creativity is key.

Section: LY2
Registration Number: 24103
Instructor: Lyon,Arabella
Schedule: MWF 4:00pm - 4:50pm
Location: Alumni 88 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 8

HIS 199SEM - Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc's success in a male-dominated era and especially in the male domain of war, her piety, her famed virginity soon gave rise to legends. She fascinated not only her contemporaries but people ever since. She has been the subject of biographies, hagiographies, scholarly analyses, poems, plays, novels, films, and endless artistic representations. She therefore offers an ideal opportunity to examine an historical figure from multiple perspectives. In this course, we will therefore read about Joan herself, her myth, her trial, and her legend. We will discuss several movie versions, and end with a staging of George Bernard Shaw's play Saint Joan.

Section: VAR
Registration Number: 21827
Instructor: Vardi,Liana
Schedule: M 4:00pm - 6:40pm
Location: Park 532 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 10

JDS 199SEM - Modern Rev: Indus, Poli, Socia

Hardly any other events in human history have contributed more greatly to the transformation of humanity and its self-understanding after the rise of modern science, than the industrial revolution (steam engine, railroad, factory line), the spread of democracy (American and French revolutions) and the spectre of socialism (Russian revolution). They opened prospects such as the universal spread of democracy, the liberal transformation of religion, the growth of a worldwide metropolitan culture, and the prospect of general prosperity. Seeking to better understand these ends by examining their beginnings, we will explore the old and the new in the prose and poetry of such thinkers and artists as Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Dostoyevsky, Darwin, Bergson and Nietzsche, among others.

Section: COH
Registration Number: 23551
Instructor: Cohen,Richard A
Schedule: TR 2:00pm - 3:20pm
Location: Baldy 119 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 4

JDS 199SEM - Modern Rev: Indus, Poli, Socia

Hardly any other events in human history have contributed more greatly to the transformation of humanity and its self-understanding after the rise of modern science, than the industrial revolution (steam engine, railroad, factory line), the spread of democracy (American and French revolutions) and the spectre of socialism (Russian revolution). They opened prospects such as the universal spread of democracy, the liberal transformation of religion, the growth of a worldwide metropolitan culture, and the prospect of general prosperity. Seeking to better understand these ends by examining their beginnings, we will explore the old and the new in the prose and poetry of such thinkers and artists as Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Dostoyevsky, Darwin, Bergson and Nietzsche, among others.

Section: COH2
Registration Number: 23579
Instructor: Cohen,Richard A
Schedule: TR 3:30pm - 4:50pm
Location: Park 143 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 6

JDS 199SEM - Human and Animal

The course will examine various depictions of human-animal relationship in Western literature and culture, from classical times to modern times. By looking at these texts, we will chart the emergence of a figure that occupies a borderline state between human and animal, and explore its implications for our understanding of Jewish and Christian relationships as well as human and animal nature. Readings include: Ovid, Marie de France, Hobbes, Shakespeare, Heine, Baudelaire, Tolstoy, Nietzsche, Kafka, and more.

Section: PIN
Registration Number: 21965
Instructor: Pines,Noam
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Clemen 708 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 1

JDS 199SEM - Genesis and Gender

Section: SEG
Registration Number: 24371
Instructor: Segol,Marla B
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Baldy 125 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 7

LIN 199SEM - Babel Forever! Lang Diff Arise

The threats posed by globalization and modernization to the world's linguistic and cultural diversity are a popular topic of public and academic discussion. This seminar contrasts the effects of these homogenizing forces with the persistent emergence of new diversity. We will investigate language divergence at two levels. A number of special topics- including trade pidgins, language-like whistling and drumming, and invented languages such as Esperanto, Klingon and Quenya- provide additional perspective on communicative inventiveness and on our often conflicted attitudes toward diversity and uniformity.

Section: A
Registration Number: 21734
Instructor: Fertig,David L.
Schedule: MWF 12:00pm - 12:50pm
Location: Baldy 108 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 6

LIN 199SEM - 1534 Onward: Lang of America's

The most up-to-date estimates count over 2000 languages spoken by the one billion people living in Africa, about the same number of languages as spoken by the more than four billion people of Asia. These languages are divided across four large language families and a dozen or so smaller ones, and they show considerable variation in the way they sound and the way that words and sentences are formed within them. Next to this linguistic diversity, one finds extraordinary cultural diversity as well, with hunter-gatherers living alongside farmers and rapidly growing urban areas increasingly dominating the lives of Africa?s people. The continent spans diverse ecologies as well: rainforest, savannah, desert, and even mediterranean climates are found there. This course will examine Subsaharan African diversity?from the perspective of the present day and what we know about the African past?through the lens of language. Students will be introduced to basic concepts of linguistics in order to be able to understand the ways in which the continent?s languages are different from, and similar to, each other in an informed way, and the course will also consider topics at the intersection of linguistics and other fields, in particular: the historical development of African languages and what this tells us about the continent?s prehistory, how patterns of language use relate to other features of culture, the relationship between the languages that people speak and their genes, and how the natural environment influences the maintenance and spread of languages. By the end of the course, students will have a basic understanding of the nature of linguistic scholarship, the ways in which language can be used to illuminate a wide range of questions of human history and culture, and an appreciation of the linguistic, cultural, and political diversity of African communities.

Section: D
Registration Number: 21737
Instructor: Michelson,Karin E
Schedule: MWF 10:00am - 10:50am
Location: Talbrt 103 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 6

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Soc Rsp:Operations

Welcome to the Backstage of Modern Life. Why do they put mirrors in elevators? What do fire fighters and artists have in common? When is efficiency ever a bad thing? How do you plan for a surprise? Exactly how much food is in a supermarket? What do all these questions have in common? They are all answered by operations management, the theme of this freshman seminar.

Section: B7
Registration Number: 22866
Instructor: Kishore,Rajiv
Schedule: T 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Jacobs B32 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

MUS 199SEM - On Edge:A Course to Prac Perf

On the Edge: A course to Practice Performing A course designed for the performer as a practical method to bridge the gap between the studio and the stage. Performers will concentrate on strengthening performance skills, building a strong stage presence, and increasing confidence and awareness in an effort to reach "peak" performance. Note that performance here includes many different categories of activity the class is not simply for performers such actors, musicians and dancers, but welcomes everyone, since we are all called upon to perform, whether in public speaking, presentation and leadership in the workplace, as part of our civic responsibilities as citizens of a democracy, in advocative and interpersonal roles of every kind. Taught in intensive two or three-hour segments, classes are small with a maximum of twenty-five students. Participants perform in every class building to the final public concert.

Section: KOP
Registration Number: 22310
Instructor: Kopperud,Jean K
Schedule: TR 5:00pm - 6:20pm
Location: Baird 250 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

MUS 199SEM - Open Ears, Open Minds

?OPEN EARS, OPEN MINDS? is a listening and discussion-based class that explores the way indie rock and indie pop music intersect with classical new music (music composed within the last 50 years). Each week will feature a new classical work juxtaposed with a piece of popular music with the intention of drawinf parallels between the two seemingly disparate worlds. Through weekly listening and writing assignments, students will learn to open their minds and ears to a variety of sound worlds. By cultivating critical listeners who are willing to explore challenging sounds and dismiss genre barriers, the hope is that students will apply this openness of thinking to their academic journey and beyond.

Section: MOS
Registration Number: 24498
Instructor: Moseley,Brian C
Schedule: MW 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Baird 327 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

MUS 199SEM - Beethoven & the Econ of Genius

Beethoven and the Economics of Genius - Trained from a young age to serve as a court musician, Ludwig van Beethoven instead spent much of his career navigating a treacherous new world of public concerts, sheet music sales, and contract negotiations. Beethoven and the Economics of Genius begins with a look at Beethoven as a businessman, and considers how the composer?s professional decisions influenced not only his financial situation but also the style of his music itself. The seminar investigates the reasons why the public?s fascination with Beethoven?s life and music increased following his death in 1827, and how the composer?s legacy influenced both the development of nineteenth-century style and the growth of the modern musical marketplace. At the end of the seminar, we will explore Beethoven?s ongoing role and importance as an icon of classical music in contemporary culture.

Section: STR
Registration Number: 24169
Instructor: Strykowski,Derek Robert
Schedule: MWF 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Baird 227 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 3

PHI 199SEM - Living Well

This course explores the question of what it means to live well and some of the obstacles to living well from a philosophical point of view. Students will become familiar with classic ideas of philosophers like Aristotle and Zhuangzi, but also more contemporary work. We will examine issues relevant to becoming a university student like procrastination and note-taking from a practical point of view with an eye to solving common obstacles to living well. We will also critically examine the underlying concepts. For example, considering how procrastination relates to theories of rationality and the ideas of memory and originality that are involved in academic writing.

Section: BOM
Registration Number: 22078
Instructor: Bommarito,Nicolas P
Schedule: MWF 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Hoch 139 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 2

PHI 199SEM - Philosophy in Literature

Literary works often deal with important philosophical issues. For example, many narratives are structured around underlying ethical distinctions between good and bad actions or between good and bad character traits. In addition, many narratives raise questions about human nature or the structure of the world in which we live and act. The purpose of this class is to consider how a general philosophical issue might be investigated through a work of literature. We will read both philosophy texts and literary texts, using the philosophy texts first for a basis understanding of a particular issues and then comparing the treatment of that philosophical issue in a selection of literary works. We focus initially on questions of human freedom. What does it mean for human beings to be free to direct their lives and choose to commit, or refrain from committing, particular actions? Is the world structured in a way that allows for human freedom? Is freedom a requirement for moral responsibility? The second half of the course focuses on ethical issues. What sorts of actions are morally permissible? What sorts of actions are morally impermissible? What sorts of habits or personality traits characterize morally virtuous people? What sorts of habits or personality traits characterize morally degenerate people? How, generally, should we live? What are the attributes of a good life? Particular philosophical texts used in the course include selections from Aristotle, Epictetus, Boethius, Kant, and Bentham. Literary readings include works of Sophocles, Henry James, David Thoreau, and Benjamin Franklin.

Section: DON
Registration Number: 22081
Instructor: Donnelly,Maureen
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

PUB 199SEM - Health-You, Me, or We?

As individuals, we are often concerned with our own health- we want to be as healthy as possible, worry about getting sick, and try to manage our physical, mental, and social well being in a variety of ways. As a society, we are often concerned with our health and others "health" current events like global epidemics, the spread of obesity and its health consequences, controversy over health care reform, just to name a few, highlight the importance of health in many social contexts.In this course, we will use big ideas from public health to explore individual and societal concerns about health. In particular, we will use the lens of public health to understand explain and address three big issues: mandatory vaccination (should parents be required to vaccinate their children?), health disparities (why does health depend on things like education, income, and race/ethnicity), and health care reform (should people be required to have health insurance and how do we pay for it?).

Section: KIV
Registration Number: 21991
Instructor: Kiviniemi,Marc T
Schedule: MWF 12:00pm - 12:50pm
Location: Dfn 207 (South Campus)
Seats Available: 3

RLL 199SEM - Rep. of Smoking and Smoker

The goal of the class is to identify and evaluate the image of tobacco and the tobacco user in representative selections from the literary, cinematic, and artistic traditions of French-, Italian-, and Spanish-speaking countries. In particular we will seek to trace how that image has evolved since the introduction of tobacco to Europe. Given its evolution and impact, tobacco use must be understood in a broad historical and social context; the course will therefore take into account economic and political factors as well as public health issues.

Section: JAM
Registration Number: 22233
Instructor: Jameson,Maureen
Schedule: MWF 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Alumni 88 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1