Spring 2018 UB Seminar Courses (3-credit)

The following are approved 3-credit UB Seminar courses for Spring 2018 with open seats. Incoming first-year and transfer students with less than 45 domestic credits will take a 3-credit UB Seminar. 

Registration Reminder

Before registering, browse all UB Seminar options and ensure you have found your final choice. After enrolling, you will be unable to make a change in your selection. 

AAS 199SEM - The American Image:Art, Media

How do images affect culture, society, and identity in America? As Americans, how do we sort out whom we are, while constantly bombarded with images and symbols telling us who we should be? These are a few of the questions we will explore in this cross-cultural course on American Diversity. Investigating the roles of race, class, religion, gender, and sexuality in the world of images. Throughout the semester we will pay particular attention to visual mediums such as art, television, movies, printed images, and a host of cultural symbols affecting us everyday. Readings and other course materials are interdisciplinary, including anthropological and historical perspectives, documentary films, literary material and most of all, art.

Section: NEZ
Registration Number: 22024
Instructor: Zarragoitia,Nestor E
Schedule: MWF 11:00am - 11:50am
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 9

AAS 199SEM - The African American Artist

From their earliest arrival in the American colonies until current times, African American artists have strived to establish their artistic traditions, while at the same time grappling with their historical social, economic, and political statuses in society.This course will explore that journey, including their struggles for self-identity in an art world whose traditions are rooted in disparity.This class will focus on different eras, art movements, and the lives and works of key artists that define this vision. We will examine the overall impacts of the African Diaspora on artistic expression, and the interwoven social issues confronting each generation.

Section: ZAR
Registration Number: 23516
Instructor: Zarragoitia,Nestor E
Schedule: MWF 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Talbrt 112 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 24

BCH 199SEM - Dancing DNA;Embodying the Hum

The ability to engage in the creative process is one factor that makes human beings unique. Processes of creation can be observed both in the movement embedded in our cells and through conscious expressions of human endeavor such as choreography. In this course, we seek to explore the commonalities between movement that occur at the molecular level in the DNA and movements that exist in the whole body while experiencing and creating dance. This course brings processes of the human genome together with movement/dance creation. Dialog between these systems will provide knowledge and experiences that allow students to integrate choreographic methods and devices with an understanding of the human genome to enhance literacy in both disciplines and an appreciation of the importance of each. By visualizing and embodying molecular processes through dance, students will identify with these fundamental functions as a part of themselves- understand how they function and that they are constantly at work. Topics covered will include: genome maintenance, DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation, as well as explorations of space, size, dynamics, shape, body parts, repetition, retrograde, transposition, transformation and augmentation.

Section: BCH
Registration Number: 23342
Instructor: Surtees,Jennifer A.
Schedule: MW 12:00pm - 1:20pm
Location: Alumni 188 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 9

CL 199SEM - Handling Monsters: A Handbook

Explore the highly contentious and volatile nature of ancient Greek politics. Topics discussed include: civil war, foreign war, amnesty, revolutionary ideology, political amorality, imperialism, and the origins of democracy. Through an analysis of several case studies, students will understand why the Greeks often encountered great difficulties in their attempts to limit domestic conflict and promote large-scale cooperation. This is a central question for students of ancient Greek politics. But ? as you will see, grappling with it also will provide new and interesting insights into domestic and international politics in the modern world.

Section: BOYD
Registration Number: 21908
Instructor: Boyd,Timothy
Schedule: TR 2:00pm - 3:20pm
Location: Clemen 117 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 13

CL 199SEM - The Ancient World in the Movie

This course will explore the representation of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds in modern cinema, focusing on films made between 1960 and the present. We will pay attention not only to what these films show us about modern attitudes toward the ancient world, but also to how modern filmmakers use these films, set in antiquity, to talk about our modern world. Students will explore works of literature, ancient and modern, that offer our discussions rich context and further into how narratives reflect and shape cultural values.

Section: MCG
Registration Number: 21918
Instructor: McGuire,Donald T.
Schedule: TR 12:30pm - 1:50pm
Location: Filmor 319 (Ellicott Complex)
Seats Available: 18

COL 199SEM - Literature and/of Human Rights

What is dignity? What is the relationship of dignity to what Victor Hugo calls the inviolability of life, but also and no less trenchantly to both the death penalty and the right to die? How does the concept of dignity work both to defend and to challenge both the death penalty and the right to die? On Dignity and Death explores these questions through readings of philosophy (Cicero, Kant, Hegel, Foucault), criminology (Beccaria), legal and medical accounts (Dworkin, Cohen-Almagor), literature (Hugo, Camus, Capote, Mailer), and abolitionists (Badinter, Prejean). We will also read the Universal Declaration of Universal Human Rights (1948) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (proposed 1966, ratified 1976) in order to examine the paradox of a universal human right to life that coexists with the death penalty. In addition, we will read several United States Supreme Court decisions concerning both the States right to put to death and its right to make live.

Section: SI
Registration Number: 22011
Instructor: Irlam,Shaun A.
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Clemen 640 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 20

COM 199SEM - Getting to Yes: Influence

This course teaches the main ingredients in persuasive communication contexts. What makes some communication strategies or form more or less persuasive than other communication ones? What are the various forms of persuasion? Major theories and experiments in the field of persuasion will be reviewed. Students will also gain a practical context for persuasion by participating in a group project that requires students to research a campus-wide problem and persuade a panel of experts of the importance of their solution to the problem.

Section: MCG
Registration Number: 22028
Instructor: Green,Melanie Colette
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 9

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: I
Registration Number: 21796
Instructor: Latorre,Julia Talarico
Schedule: MW 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Baldy 101 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 3

EAS 199SL - Grand Challenges for Engineeri

Engineers are problem solvers. Problem solving in engineering practice (i.e., industry) differs from the problems typically encountered in the classroom. Notably, "real world" problems are ill-structured, have multiple conflicting objectives, non-engineering standards and constraints, require knowledge from multiple disciplines (even beyond engineering!) and necessitate working on a team. The objective of this course is to allow students with an interest in engineering to explore an engineering identity. Through this exploration, students will gain an appreciation for the characteristics of good engineers: (1) Technical competence (technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, creativity; (2) Interpersonal skills (strong technical communication, effective teamwork); (3) Work ethic (attention to detail, diligence, persistence); and (4) Moral standards: honesty, integrity. This exploration will be facilitated through team projects, individual assignments and a professional development and career planning portfolio. The theme for this course will be consideration of the "Grand Challenges for Engineering" as defined by the National Academy of Engineers (www.engineeringchallenges.org).

Section: I2
Registration Number: 21799
Instructor: Latorre,Julia Talarico
Schedule: T 9:00am - 9:50am
Location: Baldy 110 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 3

ELP 199SEM - Afr Amer Struggle for Equal Ed

This course studies the history of Black Student and other Social Movements in the U.S. in the struggle for equal and high quality educational opportunities. We will look at the ideological, political and economic origins of Black Protest movements for equal education, and explore the rhetoric and tactics employed to achieve those goals. We will pay particular attention to the structures of oppression (slavery, Jim Crow and ultimately mass Incarceration) and how they have worked to suppress and oppress the rights and freedom of both poor people and Black people of all economic statuses. This course also seeks to challenge students to understand themselves, other people, and U. S. institutional structures in more complex and dynamic ways. We will use developmental and sociological concepts to analyze social identity formation, social group differences, inter- and intra-group differences and relations. Many of the most enduring social divisions, political conflicts, and public policy debates in the United States revolve around the historically difficult and salient issue of race. This course will examine the role of race in American relations and its contemporary significance to the nation?s citizens, politicians, and governmental institutions. It will incorporate the experiences of all races, but will focus most extensively on the experience of African-Americans in the U. S.

Section: 0
Registration Number: 23952
Instructor: Durand,Henry J
Schedule: T 1:00pm - 3:40pm
Location: Capen 108 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 23

ENG 199SEM - Media CSI:50 Shades of Fake Ne

Our world is saturated with information and much of it is inaccurate. This class will teach you to identify bad information and show you how to keep it from spreading. It will also teach you about the role and responsibility of journalism in the world and why it should matter to you. This class will ask questions about where information originates and the motivations of those producing, spreading and sharing it. It will push you to consider your media diet and how it affects your life and your understanding of the world.

Section: JKB
Registration Number: 23784
Instructor: Kleinberg Biehl,Jody
Schedule: TR 11:00am - 12:20pm
Location: Park 143 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 15

ENG 199SEM - Myths of King Arthur

This course will explore cultural productions associated with King Arthur and his world, considering works of literature, mythology, visual arts, and film. After an introduction to the misty beginnings of Arthurian legend in early medieval history, we will engage with a survey of medieval Arthurian works (in translation) from a range of European cultures. Our course will explore chivalry and courtly love, tournaments, knights such as Gawain and Lancelot, and ladies such as Queen Guinevere and Morgan le Fay. We will also examine the modern reception of Arthur, by exploring images of Arthurian characters and texts, reading about modern vision, and by engaging with 2 films that deal (in very different ways) with King Arthur and his knights.

Section: SCF
Registration Number: 21452
Instructor: Schiff,Randy P
Schedule: TR 8:00am - 9:20am
Location: Alumni 90 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 22

GLY 199SEM - Global Warming

Global warming is the largest environmental issue global society has ever faced. Global warming affects sea level rise, storm frequency, droughts and potentially even wild winter weather experienced in Buffalo. Despite climate change costing global economies trillions of dollars, there is reluctance to alter ways of life, and even plain denial that climate change relates to human activities. This UB Seminar focuses on the big and often controversial topic of global warming. Students will explore science, impacts and mitigation of both global and local climate change through lectures, exercises, in-class activities, discussion and debate.

Section: BRI
Registration Number: 23874
Instructor: Briner,Jason
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Talbrt 112 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 13

GLY 199SEM - Global Warming

Global warming is the largest environmental issue global society has ever faced. Global warming affects sea level rise, storm frequency, droughts and potentially even wild winter weather experienced in Buffalo. Despite climate change costing global economies trillions of dollars, there is reluctance to alter ways of life, and even plain denial that climate change relates to human activities. This UB Seminar focuses on the big and often controversial topic of global warming. Students will explore science, impacts and mitigation of both global and local climate change through lectures, exercises, in-class activities, discussion and debate.

Section: HEN
Registration Number: 23876
Instructor: Henshue,Nicholas J
Schedule: MWF 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Location: Cooke 127B (North Campus)
Seats Available: 11

MGG 199SR - Corp&Ind Social Respblity

Section: B1
Registration Number: 24898
Instructor: Grossman,Debora M
Schedule: ARR -
Location: Arr Arr (North Campus)
Seats Available: 17

PSY 199SEM - Discover Mind and Brain

One of the most compelling questions in psychology is how the mind works, and the relationship between mental functioning and the physical brain. It is a question that was first addressed by philosophers, that psychologists have more recently tackled using the scientific method. In this seminar, we will explore how one studies minds, and the challenges involved in this endeavor. We will also discuss research concerning the contents of what is in our mind (sensory data), and the limits of the mind?s ability to process this information. Finally, we will discuss how such mental functions are related to the physical activity of the brain, and how scientists understand this connection.

Section: A
Registration Number: 23239
Instructor: Paul,Matthew J
Schedule: TR 9:30am - 10:50am
Location: Park 143 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 1

TH 199SEM - Live Event Production

Learn what it takes to put on a show: Live event (theatre, dance, concerts) production requires skilled technicians and managers to bring designs to life on a grand scale. Each production presents unique challenges that require research and planning. This course introduces students to issues that arise in the production of live event. In the progression of the semester, students will solve a production problem, be introduced to industry standards, and see live theatre.

Section: DB
Registration Number: 23951
Instructor: Burlingame,Dyan L
Schedule: TR 2:00pm - 3:20pm
Location: Park 146 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 18

TH 199SEM - Shakespeare Found: Rsch Method

The popularity of IMAX, 3D films and television, and earth-shaking home and theatre sound systems has raised audience members? expectations for the sensory impact of their viewing experience. This course will investigate how theatre, the world?s oldest live mimetic form, first experimented with sensory stimulation and overload through avant-garde theatre performances starting in the early 20th century, and continues to compete with film in this arena by coupling found and environmental spaces with a ?liveness? that other media cannot provide.

Section: DR
Registration Number: 22300
Instructor: Rosvally,Danielle
Schedule: MWF 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Location: Clemen 103 (North Campus)
Seats Available: 27