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Media advisory: The Internet in your car, how origami leads to advanced materials and 3-D printed artificial limbs

An image of origami

Design engineers are using the math behind origami (shown above) to create new materials, robots and other devices.

News media are invited to try all the gadgets in Lexus’ Internet connected car

Release Date: August 18, 2014

The conference will include up to 2,000 engineers who work for Fortune 500 companies and startups, as well as higher education, government and other organizations.

BUFFALO, N.Y. – How does origami apply to engineering design? When might all cars be connected to the Internet?

Answers to those questions and cool tech can be found in the next two days at a large gathering of mechanical engineers at the Buffalo Niagara Convention Center.

Organized by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and co-hosted by the University at Buffalo, the conference includes up to 2,000 engineers who work for Fortune 500 companies and startups, as well as higher education, government and other organizations.

News media members are invited to attend.

The following presentations will take place during the next two days.

Tuesday:

How origami helps engineers

Erik Demaine, a professor of computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will discuss how scientists use the math behind the traditional art of paper folding to develop advanced materials, robots, computer models and countless other applications.

He will speak during a session that runs from 8:30 to 10:10 a.m., Room 101 H.

3-D printing and medical devices

Scott Summit, director of technology for Bespoke Products at 3D Systems, a South Carolina-based company that specializes in 3-D printers and related products, will talk about how 3-D printed artificial limbs can be customized to meet an individual’s taste.

He will speak during a session that runs from 2:20 to 3:10 p.m. in the conference theater, on the convention center’s second floor.

Wednesday:

Security, the Internet and automobiles

Derek Kuhn, vice president of sales and marketing at QNX Software, will discuss how to ensure the safety and security of cars that connect to the Internet.

He will speak during a session that runs from 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. in the conference theater, on the convention center’s second floor, and in a panel discussion at 11:10 a.m.

The Internet in your car

Featuring 12 connected vehicle technologies, including an alcohol breathalyzer (with built-in engine lockout), a wireless smartphone charger, advanced weather/road sensing equipment and a 4G wireless network.

Members of the media will be able to try the gadgets from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on the convention center’s second floor.

Onsite contact: Deborah Wetzel, ASME media relations manager, at 917-580-0974 or wetzeld@asme.org.

J. Robert “Bob” Sims, ASME president, is available to discuss the conference. Reporters interested in speaking with him should contact Wetzel.

Media Contact Information

Cory Nealon
News Content Manager, Computer Science, Economic Development, Engineering, Sustainability
Tel: 716-645-4614
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
Twitter: @UBengineering