August to November

Fall 2020 Edition

The Baldy Center Blog

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The Baldy Center blog features interdisciplinary perspectives on research and current events from interdisciplinary UB scholars whose work intersects with law, legal institutions, and social policy. New blogs will be released twice a month during each academic semester. Subscribe to be informed when new blogs are posted, or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram for all the Baldy Center news.

Faculty Blog Posts

Blog Host/Producer

Aldiama Anthony.

Aldiama Anthony 

Aldiama Anthony is an international student from the Commonwealth of Dominica, currently in her third year of law school at the University at Buffalo School of Law. Her interest in law began during her undergraduate studies at Monroe College, where she completed her Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice with summa cum laude honors. Ms. Anthony is currently the 2020-2021 BLSA president of her law school’s chapter, the Honorary Law Student of the Women’s Bar Association of Western New York, and the Parliamentarian for the Student Bar Association at the University at Buffalo School of Law. In her spare time, Ms. Anthony enjoys networking, traveling the world, and blogging her life experiences on social media.

Executive Producers

Samantha Barbas, Professor, Director of the Baldy Center
Caroline Funk, Associate Director of the Baldy Center

BLOG POST 1

Silverman, Patterson, Wang: Taking on Stereotypes to Protect Fair and Affordable Housing Policies

Taking on Stereotypes to Protect Fair and Affordable Housing Policies. Housing project image courtesy of unsplash.

Photograph courtesy of unsplash.

Blog Authors: Robert Silverman, Department of Urban and Regional Planning; Kelly Patterson, School of Social Work; Chihuangji Wang, Doctoral Student, Department of Urban and Regional Planning

Introduction: Our article, “Questioning Stereotypes about U.S. Site-Based Subsidized Housing” (forthcoming in the International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis), grew out of work done with the support of a Baldy Center research grant. The research examined data for all public housing and other site-based subsidized properties in the U.S. in order to determine the veracity of long-standing stereotypes about these properties. Stereotypes about government subsidized housing have dominated public discourse since the early 1950s. In many respects, these stereotypes have penetrated debates about public policies designed to address the shortage of affordable housing and become a mainstay in American society. This is true when public housing is discussed, but also with respect to the spectrum of fair and affordable housing policy.

BLOG POST 2

Jinting Wu: Disability Segregation in an Age of Inclusion: Navigating Educational Pathways through Special Education Schools in Contemporary China

Disability Segregation in an Age of Inclusion: Navigating Educational Pathways through Special Education Schools in Contemporary China. Photograph courtesy of Debra Kolodczak, PhD, Copyright 2020. .

Photograph courtesy of Debra Kolodczak, PhD, Copyright 2020.

Blog Author: Jinting Wu, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, University at Buffalo

Introduction: Across the globe, the impact of child disability on educational inequality has been relatively neglected. My current research focuses on the rising number of children with disabilities who grow up with stigma and bleak futures in China’s segregated special schools. By focusing on a uniquely marginalized population in a segregated educational setting, this research fills a compelling need to understand the intersection of disability and segregation – a dual marginality that continues to exist globally yet remains under-examined in educational, legal, and disability studies literature to date.

BLOG POST 3

Steilen: The Place of Norms in Separating Power

We the People.

Blog Author: Matthew Steilen, Professor of Law, School of Law, University at Buffalo

Introduction: One of the chief intellectual discoveries of the past four years has been the degree to which government rests on norms: on a shared sense of the proper way to go about the business of government. This is unsurprising for followers of the law and society movement, with which the Baldy Center is so closely associated. From the beginning, scholars of law and society have demonstrated the limits of formalism in explaining how the law actually works. One can think of the Trump presidency as finally demonstrating for the wider world of legal scholars, the essential role of shared understandings, legal culture, accepted practice, informal conventions, and customs in our separation of powers. The judge-made doctrine has changed only at the margins, and its major holdings remain intact, but the real meaning of separation of powers has been altered dramatically.

BLOG POST 4

Jaekyung Lee and Namsook Kim: “Aliens” on College Campuses: Immigrant and International Students’ Educational Opportunities and Challenges

Images from International Fiesta 2019 with the theme 'Human Nuture.' The event is organized by the International Council of the UB Student Association and took place March 9, 2019 in the Center for the Arts.

Image from International Fiesta 2019 with the theme 'Human Nuture.' The event is organized by the International Council of the UB Student Association and took place March 9, 2019 in the Center for the Arts, courtesy of UB SmugMug.

Blog Authors:  Jaekyung Lee, PhD, Graduate School of Education, and Namsook Kim, PhD, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, University at Buffalo

Introduction:
 We would like to start with a pop quiz. What is one of the common background characteristics of the following people (in categories 1 and 2 each)?

(1) Madeline Albright (Former US Secretary of State), Kamala Harris (US Senator, Vice President Candidate), Sergey Brin (Google Co-Founder)

(2) Kofi Annan (Former UN Secretary-General, Nobel Peace Laureate), Juan Manuel Santos (Former President of Columbia, Nobel Peace Laureate), Robin Yanhong Li (Baidu Co-Founder)

BLOG POST 5

Nadine Shaanta Murshid: Unprecedented Times

Photo caption: A homeless woman cooking on the street during government-imposed lockdown as a preventive measure against the COVID-19 coronavirus in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on April 10, 2020.

Photo caption: A homeless woman cooking on the street during government-imposed lockdown as a preventive measure against the COVID-19 coronavirus in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on April 10, 2020. (Baldy Center/Shutterstock)

Blog Author: Nadine Shaanta Murshid, Associate Professor and Interim Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. This blog is Professor Murshid’s personal reflection on Unprecedented Times.

Introduction: 
In my work, I focus on violence which is explicitly and implicitly embedded in patriarchy, racism, and capitalism. I hold institutions accountable as I analyze policies and procedures that produce the social problems that we see around us. Here are four thoughts I’d like to share.

BLOG POST 6

Elizabeth Bowen and Nicole Capozziello: A Human Rights Perspective on Homelessness and COVID-19

Pending.

Blog Authors: Elizabeth Bowen, PhD, and Nicole Capozziello, MSW. This blog represents the personal reflections of the author.

Introduction:
 In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, experts warned of the unique and devastating havoc that the novel illness could wreak on people experiencing homelessness, an already vulnerable population. While reports thus far suggest that neither the prevalence nor mortality of COVID-19 among people who are homeless has been as severe as feared, the pandemic has brought about opportunities to enact innovative and long overdue approaches to the issue of homelessness. Though there are compelling public health reasons for providing housing assistance and related services, we believe that there is more enduring value in reframing homelessness from a human rights perspective, ensuring housing to every American during the pandemic and beyond.

BLOG POST 7

Laina Y. Bay-Cheng: No Choice But “Yes”: Strategic Consent to Unwanted Sex

Blog 7: No Choice But “Yes”: Strategic Consent to Unwanted Sex; Photo courtesy of the author.

Photo courtesy of the author.

Blog Author: Laina Y. Bay-Cheng, MSW, PhD, University at Buffalo School of Social Work.  This blog represents the personal reflections of the author.

Introduction:
One of the most widely-used comprehensive sex ed curricula in the U.S. is entitled, Making Proud Choices! Echoing this cheerleading (and imploring) sentiment is the sex ed program offered youth in Maryland’s juvenile justice and child welfare systems, Power Through Choices, which includes the lesson, Creating the Future You Want.

The Baldy Center encourages discussion and welcomes comments. Comments are limited to 125 words and must adhere to the university’s Comment Guidelines. University staff moderate comments, and reserve the right not to publish comments that do not add anything new to the discussion or fail to follow UB's Comment Guidelines. We invite you to send comments via our general email, baldycenter@buffalo.edu  or give us a call at 716-645-2102 ... or via the form, below.

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