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Official UB news and information for the media
2/4/11

An article on Consumer Reports' Cars Blog looks at research by Greg Fabiano, associate professor of counseling, school and educational psychology, on teens with ADHD and driver safety and reports a 2008 study that showed that people with ADHD who were sober performed as poorly on simulated driving tests as those motorists without ADHD who were legally drunk. The article included a UB-produced video interview with Fabiano.

2/5/11

An article in the New York Times' Slap Shot blog about a movement to push back the age at which body checking is allowed in youth hockey reports not all researchers agree that the age should be pushed to 13, among them Barry Willer, professor of psychiatry and rehabilitation services, who has worked on youth safety programs with Hockey Canada and USA Hockey and has 25 years experience studying brain injuries.

2/2/11

An article in the Toronto Globe and Mail about the controversy over what age to introduce checking in youth hockey quotes Barry Willer, professor of psychiatry and rehabilitation medicine, who said, "I don't think the bodycheck should be the culprit it's made out to be."

2/3/11

A story on PBS NewsHour about the origins of tinnitus, the phantom ringing that plagues millions of Americans and countless military veterans, and whether stress plays a role in provoking the condition, interviews Richard Salvi, director of the Center for Hearing and Deafness, who says he is not convinced that stress is a root cause for all tinnitus patients, although he agrees there is a correlation of some kind.

2/6/11

Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies, is quoted in an article in the Los Angeles Times about the television series "Friday Night Lights" and its realistic portrayal of marriage. "It's a good family show, and I think it's a role model for how you handle normal life. It's very realistic because it's very grounded. It's not like a soap where crazy things happen," she said.

2/7/11

Nadia Shahram, a Law School adjunct instructor who lectures on the effects of religion and culture on family law, was quoted in an article distributed by the Associated Press about yesterday's conviction of Muzzammil Hassan, who stabbed and beheaded his wife in 2009. The murder, she said, was "a mix of domestic violence and honor killing." The article was picked up by news outlets throughout the nation, including the Wall Street Journal, Houston Chronicle, Boston Globe and CBS News. International coverage includes Metro Canada, Arab Times, The Australian and The Guardian.

2/8/11

Charles Carr, lecturer emeritus in the Law School, was interviewed by the Associated Press about the murder trial of Muzzammil Hassan and the hazards of acting as your own lawyer in a trial. "It's almost never a good idea," he said. "It's like putting a person who's never played baseball before out in the outfield and telling them, 'you'll catch on.'" The article appeared in outlets throughout the U.S. and the world, including the Los Angeles Times, Salon, The South African Star, The Canadian Press, Huffington Post and CBS News. Locally, WBEN-AM and the Buffalo News carried the story.

2/8/11

Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies, is quoted in an article in the Chicago Tribune on the appeal of romantic comedies. "Romantic comedies are very big….These movies become popular in times when there's a lot of social disruption," she said.

2/10/11

Jonathan Katz, associate professor of visual studies, was interviewed on NPR about the scheduled closing of the National Portrait Gallery exhibition Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture, the first Smithsonian Institution show to focus on gay and lesbian contributions to American culture, and the attention the exhibition generated.

2/10/11

An article distributed by UPI reports UB researchers are developing a unique smartphone application that will help them track participants in a study of urban air pollution exposure.

2/10/11

An article in the Tahoe Daily Tribune about the number of people with sleep problems reports scientists at UB found that people who sleep fewer than six hours a night during the work week are more likely to have elevated levels of blood sugar than those who sleep six to eight hours.

2/14/11

An editorial in the Buffalo News argues for reasonable and predictable tuition increases at SUNY schools mentioning that while the governor has supported two of three elements of UB 2020, he has not agreed to the third element: tuition increases. The editorial also reports that a SUNY student delegation of 465,000 students in a recent gathering advocated moderate tuition increases as long as those extra funds aren't used to balance the state budget.

2/13/11

Jerry Newman, SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor of Organizations and Human Resources, is quoted in an article in the Cincinnati Enquirer about contracts that allow workers to retire with six-figure sums for unused leave and sick pay. Cash-for-time allowances as generous as Cincinnati's "all but beg for individuals to find ways to abuse them by hoarding those hours," he said.

2/13/11

Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies, is quoted in an article in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle about recent political scandals in New York State. "There's an element of arrogance in a lot of these guys," she said.

2/15/11

An article in The Economist looks at a number of articles posted on the Pileus blog, a blog written by a group of scholars who examine public policy and philosophy in light of their respective disciplines, written by Jason Sorens, assistant professor of political science, that cast a skeptical eye on the common assumption that the U.S. is an unusual or "exceptional" country.

2/17/11

James Reynolds, chair of the Department of Ophthalmology, is quoted in articles distributed by HealthDay News and Reuters about a new study that found an inexpensive drug does a better job than laser surgery in treating an eye condition that can cause blindness in preterm infants. "We are going to save some babies who would have gone blind with the laser treatment. It will change the patterns of practice overnight," said Reynolds, who wrote a commentary accompanying the study. Other news outlets writing on the research include the Wall Street Journal, Med Page Today, Medical News Today, HealthCanal.com and Science News, the magazine of the Society for Science & the Public.

2/16/11

Victor Albert, UB Empire Innovation Professor in Biological Sciences, is quoted in an article in Wired Science about the carnivorous plant bladderwort and how it sucks in its prey in about half a millisecond. As meat eaters, these plants flourish in rough and strange habitats, he says. "They're just crazy." The article also appeared in Science News, the magazine of the Society for Science & the Public.

2/18/11

An article on the front page of the Buffalo News looks at the impact a funding bill proposed by the House Republicans would have on Western New York, and reports that UB stands to lose between $17 million and $18 million in funding if the cuts go through. The article quotes Alexander Cartwright, vice president for research, who said the budget reductions would hit Buffalo especially hard. "This area," he said, "is in need of every bit of resources it can get." A related article details some of the programs targeted in the cuts, including Pell Grants for college students, UB's projected loss of $17 million in research funding and a projected 10 percent cut in funding to WBFO-FM.

2/18/11

An article in Business First looks at Buffalo's vibrant, cutting-edge medical research corridor in downtown Buffalo and its role as a leader in the research and development of lifesaving drugs and devices. The article interviews Robert Genco, vice provost and director of the Office of Science, Technology Transfer and Economic Outreach, who said, "Probably two-thirds of our inventions (about half of which end up being patented) are in the life sciences/medically related area. It's quite an active area of research and creativity among our faculty." Related articles interview Marnie LaVigne, director of business development at UB's New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences.

2/18/11

Charles Lindsey, assistant professor of marketing, is quoted in an article in Mac News World about reports that indicate weak sales for the Verizon iPhone. "Both AT&T and Verizon excel in different areas and attract different types of users, depending on the focus," he said. The article also appeared in eCommerce Times and Tech News World.

2/19/11

David Schmid, associate professor of English, was interviewed for an article distributed by the Associated Press about a Brooklyn man who went on a 28-hour stabbing rampage that led to the deaths of four people, and a number of injuries. While Americans have become increasingly familiar with certain types of multiple killings, "here you have someone who kind of can't be neatly slotted into one of those narratives," he said. The article appeared in hundreds of news outlets that include CBS News, Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, Metro Canada Toronto and the Albany Times Union.

2/21/11

A story on BBC reports monkeys trained to play computer games have helped to show that it's not just humans that feel self-doubt and uncertainty, according to a study conducted by J. David Smith, professor of psychology. "These results…could help explain why self-awareness is such an important part of our cognitive makeup and from whence it came," he said. The article was picked up by a number of South Asian news outlets, including MSN India and the Times of India.

2/20/11

An article in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch about the suicide of a city police officer quotes John Violanti, professor of social and preventive medicine. "The job is a fertile arena for suicide," he said. "They have a gun, and there's exposure to trauma."

2/21/11

Suzanne Tomkins, director of the Women, Children and Social Justice Clinic in the UB Law School, and Remla Parthasarathy, an instructor in the Women, Children and Social Justice Clinic, were interviewed on NPR about the stereotypes Buffalo Muslims have faced in the wake of the 2009 beheading murder of Aasiya Hassan, who was killed after she filed for divorce from her husband, Muzammil Hassan. The murder, both said, was a clear-cut case of domestics abuse, and not an "honor killing" as many in the local community perceived it to be.

2/22/11

An article in The National reports research conducted by David Smith, professor of psychology, has shown that monkeys are capable of exhibiting self doubt, a skill, he said, that is "one of the most important facets of humans' reflective minds." An article about his research also appeared in The Scientist.

2/23/11

A story on ABC News reports a new UB study has found that boys are more stimulated by caffeine than girls and both genders have a preference for junk food after being primed with caffeine, leading researchers to wonder whether early exposure to caffeine predisposes a person toward drug abuse, and whether caffeine is a contributor to the current obesity epidemic. The story interviews Jennifer Temple, a behavioral neurobiologist and assistant professor in the departments of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences and Psychology.

2/22/11

An article on the Huffington Post reports on efforts by House Oversight Chairman Darrell Issa to defund research he finds objectionable, including research by R. Lorraine Collins, a psychologist and associate dean of public health research. Most of the funding for her research involving marijuana and malt liquor has already been spent, she said, noting that her research does not simply study the effects of the substances in conjunction with one another – it examines methods by which public health officials can limit such use.

2/22/11

A story on UPI reports new nanomaterials research from UB could lead to new solutions to the age-old public health problem of how to separate bacteria from drinking water. Articles also appeared on Science Daily, Infection Control Today, Pollution Online, Water Online and Smart Planet.

2/22/11

A story on the Huffington Post reports on research by J. David Smith, professor of psychology and cognitive science, that found that there is growing evidence that animals share functional parallels to humans in metacognition. Discover Magazine, PhysOrg and the Toronto Globe and Mail also reported on the research.

2/22/11

J. David Smith, professor of psychology and cognitive science, was featured in a Science magazine special podcast from the 2011 AAAS meeting in Washington D.C., discussing his work in metacognition in people, pigeons and Macaque monkeys, and using techniques developed for studying animals to discover when children know what they know.

2/23/11

Stephen Dunnett, vice provost for international education, is quoted in an article in the Chronicle for Higher Education about India's fast-growing higher education market and the failure of American colleges to become more engaged in that growth. American study-abroad numbers to India have remained fairly low, he said, in part because of a lack of interest among public institutions in India in developing exchange programs. Dunnett made his remarks at the annual conference of the Association of International Education Administrators in San Francisco.

2/25/11

An article in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle about unrest in the Middle East and North Africa sending oil -- and gasoline -- prices skyrocketing quotes Lawrence Southwick, professor emeritus of finance and managerial economics. Costlier oil "hits gas and diesel prices right away," he said.

2/25/11

Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies, is quoted in an article in the Detroit News about teen dramas and their focus on sex, and the pressure parents groups are putting advertisers to drop their support of the shows. "Kids are bombarded with ideas and images that promote early and excessive sexual behavior. But what's more disturbing is TV has ceded its ground to this kind of teen programming for kids and increasingly offers little else for them to think about or imagine," she said.

2/28/11

Arun Jain, Samuel P. Capen Professor of Marketing Research, is quoted in an article distributed by the Associated Press about the impact the Social Security tax cut has had on the economy. "I think the next big event we need to watch for is Easter sales," he said. "That will reflect what they want to buy for spring. That to me will tell us how confident they are." The article appeared in outlets that include Bloomberg Businessweek, Boston Globe, St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Huffington Post.

2/25/11

An article in the Christian Science Monitor about the economic toll from the earthquake in New Zealand quotes JiYoung Park, assistant professor of urban and regional planning. Transportation and lost productivity are among the economic problems that country faces, Park said. "Laborers will lose their money directly …. And the economy will be impacted again by the losses of their purchases," he said. The article also appeared in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

2/25/11

An article in Discovery News looks at research conducted by J. David Smith, professor of psychology and cognitive science, on the self awareness of Macaque monkeys and the functional parallels to metacognition in humans.

2/26/11

Richard Salvi, director of the Center for Hearing and Deafness, is quoted in an article distributed by UPI that reports many baby boomers have reached the age where hearing loss has become a major health problem. "Hearing aids will by necessity become a necessary part of the boomers dress code as the prevalence of age-related hearing loss begins to accelerate beyond the age of 65," he said. The health and lifestyle website Third Age also reported on the findings.

2/27/11

An article distributed by UPI reports baby boomers should avoid self-prejudice and ignore ageist comments from others, according to Robert Stall, assistant professor of medicine and a specialist in geriatrics; aging boomers have a lot to expect in terms of health and well-being, he said. And as baby boomers age, they are demanding changes in how society, government and the courts deal with aging-related chronic care, according to Anthony Szczygiel, professor of law; "too often the nursing home staff gives up on the patients and stops providingÂ…therapy," he said.

2/28/11

Mark Kristal, professor of psychology, is quoted in a story on KKRM-TV in Colorado about the reasons women choose to eat their afterbirth, including to replace lost nutrients. Forty years into his studies on ingesting placenta, he said, the only way of renourishing the body with the placenta is to be very malnourished during pregnancy.