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Official UB news and information for the media
2/1/10

A Q&A on CTV News looks at the experimental Liberation Treatment for multiple sclerosis, and reports that in 2003, UB researcher Rohit Bakshi and colleagues suggested that iron deposits deep in the brain might cause MS.

2/2/10

An article in Newsweek on the differences between the situation in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina and post-earthquake Haiti quotes Andre Filiatrault, professor of civil, structural and environmental engineering, who said, "Katrina was different because [many aid workers] were from outside and had no emotional ties to the community." He also is quoted in an article in the Los Angeles Times about disaster researchers who rush to the scene of a disaster like the Haitian earthquake to study what happened in an effort to alleviate further catastrophes.

2/2/10

An editorial in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle calls on the state legislature to approve Gov. David Paterson's higher education tuition proposals giving SUNY and CUNY trustees the power to set tuition within mandated perimeters, with the increases going directly to higher education.

2/3/10

An editorial in the Buffalo News commends the NFTA for considering ways to simplify life for bus and train commuters, and for considering expanding Metro Rail in the future to accommodate the UB 2020 plan's expectations of significant growth in the number of students and faculty moving between campuses.

2/5/10

President John B. Simpson announced the creation of the "UB 2020 Opportunities Advisory Council" Thursday. The Buffalo News reports that the advisory council will help make sure WNY has a qualified and diverse pool of workers needed for jobs created by any future expansion of the university. Business First, WBFO-FM, WIVB-TV, WGRZ-TV and YNN also covered the announcement. In addition, an article in The Buzz, the business news blog of the Albany Times Union, reports on the council's creation.

2/5/10

An article in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle and on RocNow.com on a proposed five-year trial period for mayoral control of the Rochester School District quotes James Gardner, vice dean of the Law School and constitutional law expert. "Somewhere there is a line where the Legislature can't sort of devolve its own authority onto the people," said Gardner.

2/6/10

An article distributed by the Canadian Press and the Associated Press about the Super Bowl interviews two former UB football players, quarterback Drew Willy and special teams player Jamey Richard, both members of the Indianapolis Colts and one win away from becoming Super Bowl champions. The article appeared in news outlets that include Canoe, Newsday and the Sporting News.

2/6/10

An article in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle about whether Republicans or Democrats are more effective at managing the economy when in the White House looks at a paper presented by James E. Campbell, professor and chair of political science, which says there is no significant difference in the economic records of the two parties since World War II.

2/5/10

An article in Science magazine about rebuilding Haiti interviews Pierre Fouche, a Haitian citizen studying earthquake engineering at UB, about the types of construction used in the Caribbean island nation and the lack of building standards.

2/9/10

An article on International Construction Review reports that structural engineers visiting Haiti have said they are extremely concerned about premature and unsafe rebuilding and quotes Andre Filiatrault, professor of civil, structural and environmental engineering.

2/9/10

An article in the Vancouver Sun about the need for the U.S. federal government to ease bottlenecks at the U.S.-Canada border reports that an article by Kathryn Friedman, deputy director of the UB Regional Institute, urges stakeholders on both sides of the border to lobby D.C. policymakers, reminding them that "the Canada-U.S. economic relationship … is the lifeline for continued prosperity."

2/9/10

An article distributed by UPI reports a study by UB researchers has shown that fewer African Americans develop multiple sclerosis than whites, but their disease progresses more rapidly, and quotes Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, director of the Baird Multiple Sclerosis Center.

2/9/10

An article on Suite 101 on the five dangers of insomnia reports that a UB study showed that participants who slept less than six hours a night were up to five times more likely to have impaired fasting glucose levels, a condition considered a precursor to developing type 2 diabetes.

2/11/10

An article on Sky News Online reports that multiple sclerosis researchers at UB have made an important breakthrough, sparking hope of a cure for the disease.

2/10/10

An article on ABC News about the FDA considering broadening its standards on gastric banding to include teens ages 14-17 looks at the experiences of UB senior Kayla Maryles, who underwent gastric band surgery in December 2008 and had lost 72 pounds a year later.

2/10/10

An article on Miller-McCune, a research news Web site, reports on research conducted by Leonard Epstein, professor of pediatrics and social and preventive medicine, that showed that a subsidy on healthy food did not influence study participants to buy more of it as much as raising the price of unhealthy foods reduced purchases of those products.

2/11/10

An article on BBC News reports on preliminary results from a UB study of multiple sclerosis patients that showed that more than 55 percent were found to have constricted blood vessels in their brains. The research received considerable media attention in the U.S., Canada and Britain, with more than 100 articles appearing in news outlets that include KGO-TV, an ABC affiliate in San Francisco, The Scotsman, England's Daily Telegraph, the Toronto Globe and Mail, Canada's National Post, CTV and the Hamilton Spectator. Results of the study also were reported on in the Buffalo News.

2/11/10

An article in The Manitoban on brain size and the affect it has on meaningful social relationships looks at research conducted by Carol Berman, professor of anthropology, on the impact small vs. large family groups have on the behavior of rhesus monkeys.

2/11/10

A Boston Globe story on Beethoven quartet cycles held in Boston reports that the Cleveland Quartet, which played almost 20 cycles during its 26-year career, began in 1955 at UB. UB presents a six-concert cycle of the Beethoven quartets every year thanks to benefactor Frederick Slee.

2/10/10

An article in The Villanovan about the detrimental effects of energy drinks looks at research on a collection of behaviors called "toxic jock syndrome" conducted by Kathleen Miller, Research Institute on Addictions principal investigator.

2/11/10

An article on Nanotechnology & Development News reports researchers at UB are investigating the use of silver nanoparticles to improve lithium/silver vanadium oxide batteries that are used in implantable cardiac defibrillators.

2/7/10

The Architectural Record picked up the Buffalo News article about a UB architecture professor's campaign to make the next Barbie in the "I Can Be" series an architect. Barbie is "a powerful icon, and it does speak to little girls," said Despina Stratigakos, assistant professor of architecture.

2/11/10

An article in The Wall Street Journal about the continuing controversy over whether drug therapy is as effective -- and less costly -- than using stents for patients suffering chronic chest pain reports a study, known as "Courage," found that stenting usually yields no additional benefits than using generic drugs, and that the study was conducted by cardiologist William Boden, professor of medicine and preventive medicine.

2/7/10

An article in The Chronicle of Higher Education about the need for design to better accommodate the needs of people with disabilities quotes Edward Steinfeld, director of UB's Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDEA Center), and reports that while few American schools of architecture teach design relating to disability or inclusiveness, UB has assigned six faculty members to teach a graduate concentration in universal design; the article calls UB's IDEA Center the most prominent American university-based center of its kind. Seinfeld's work in universal design also is the subject of an article in Chelsea Now and Gay City News about a state-of-the-art apartment specially designed to serve people with both visual impairments and developmental disabilities.

2/16/10

L. Nelson Hopkins, professor and chair of neurosurgery, is quoted in a (Jacksonville) Florida Times-Union article about the use of a new device, Mo.Ma Ultra Proximal Cerebral Protection Device, that is designed to make carotid artery angioplasty and stenting safer. Hopkins was one of the leaders of the device's trials.

2/12/10

An article in the (Heber Springs, Ark.) Sun-Times about helping people overcome grief suggests having a pet can help people through difficult times, and reports that a UB study showed that people with hypertension who had pets had lower blood pressure when put in stressful situations.

2/12/10

An article in Machine Design about educating the next generation of engineers looks at training offered by UB and the New York State Center for Engineering Design and Industrial Innovation (NYSCEDII) using state-of-the-art techniques and expertise in immersive and high-end visualization, rapid virtual prototyping, and CAD and 3D modeling for real-time interactive design and analysis simulations. The article also looks at efforts to attract more women to the field.

2/15/10

An article in The New York Times about the Public Higher Education Empowerment and Innovation Act looks at the pros and cons of the bill proposed by Gov. Paterson and compares it to ideas proposed by former Gov. Elliot Spitzer, who created a state commission on higher ed and advocated making UB and Stony Brook flagship campuses.

2/16/10

An article in the Vancouver Sun reports a new academic study, Border Barometer, conducted by researchers at the UB Regional Institute and the University of Washington, shows that the value of economic activity between the U.S. and Canada dropped 9 percent in 2008 and auto and truck traffic at the border declined 4.8 percent.

2/16/10

A story on Minnesota Public Radio about people who refuse to believe there is no link between vaccines and autism looks at the role that "motivated reasoning" plays, and reports the phenomenon is described by researchers from UB and other institutions, who have found that people suffer from uncomfortable cognitive dissonance when they hear information that conflicts with their existing beliefs, and then seek out information that supports their original opinion while ignoring contradictory information.

2/23/10

An article in the Fort Myers (Fla.) News-Press about a local dentist who makes house calls to senior citizens who are unable to come into the office for dental work reports that a 2005 survey conducted by the School of Dental Medicine found that more than half of the seniors who responded were not regularly seeing a dentist because of lack of transportation, anxiety and cost.

2/22/10

An article on KGMI-AM in Washington State reports that a new academic study conducted by UB and Western Washington University shows a serious decline in economic activity along the Canada-U.S. border.

2/17/10

An article in Discovery News about "extreme breath-holding," and a Swiss freediver who held his breath underwater for a record-breaking 19 minutes and 21 seconds, quotes Claes Lundgren, SUNY Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Physiology and Biophysics, who said extreme breath-holding requires certain tricks and is "not recommendable at all."

2/17/10

An article in Scientific American about research projects that have benefited from stimulus funds quotes Ezra Zubrow, professor of anthropology, who is using funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to study the response of past humans to climate change.

2/25/10

The Washington Post is running an Associated Press story and slide show that describes a new robotic surgery simulator developed by UB engineers in collaboration with Roswell Park. The new simulator was unveiled at a news conference as an example of the commercialization of UB research and Roswell's strengthened emphasis on robotic surgery. The story received wide distribution, with articles appearing in news outlets nationally and internationally, including ABC News, The New York Times, Business Week, CBS News, Canadian Business and the Sydney Morning Herald. The Web site Engadget.com also did a story on the technology.

2/25/10

An article on TIME magazine's Wellness blog looks at whether "sin" taxes might impact people's food choices, and reports UB psychologists conducted a study on whether raising the cost of junk food and subsidizing healthier foods changed people's shopping habits. In addition, an article distributed by UPI reports on the research, and quotes Leonard Epstein, professor of pediatrics and social and preventive medicine.

2/24/10

An article in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle's business blog reports that in 2009, one in four jobs in the Buffalo area were in an occupation where the median wage was below the poverty line for a family of four, according to a new policy brief from UB's Regional Institute.

2/27/10

UB professor Andre Filiatrault, director of MCEER, is quoted in an article in The New York Times about a destructive 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Chile on Saturday. Chile is no stranger to earthquakes, he said, and established strict building codes in 1985, shortly after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck the country. The article appeared in numerous outlets, including the San Francisco Chronicle and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Filiatrault also is quoted in a UPI article about the earthquake.

2/27/10

An article in The Wall Street Journal about using metal stents to open neck arteries instead of performing surgery to clear fatty plaque quotes L. Nelson Hopkins, professor and chair of neurology, who said that if physicians are properly trained in stenting procedures, stents are as effective as surgery in preventing strokes.

2/28/10

An article in the Legislative Gazette about a bill that would discontinue state investments in companies that sell or design what one assemblymen considers age-inappropriate clothing quotes Elayne Rapping, professor of American studies, who said the sexualization of girls "has gone way, way overboard."

2/22/10

An article in Kenya's Daily Nation about a government proposal that could eliminate a board in charge of student admissions to public universities reports that a team that prepared the recommendations included D. Bruce Johnstone, professor emeritus of higher and comparative education, and Pamela Marcucci, project manager for UB's International Comparative Higher Education Finance and Accessibility Project. An article about the proposed education changes in Kenya also appeared in AllAfrica.com.