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Official UB news and information for the media
11/2/04

An article in <i>The Washington Times</i> on the role of email and electronic campaign literature in the presidential election process quotes Alex Halavais, assistant professor of communication, who said electronic communication may be changing the way people perceive politics in America.

11/2/04

An article in <i>The New York Times</i> reports on a UB study that showed that some cancer patients on a common medication are being warned to stay away from St. John's wort because the herbal supplement appears to reduce the effectiveness of the anticancer drug.

11/4/04

An article in <i>The Chronicle of Higher Education</i> calls political scientists' predictions of the winner of the 2004 presidential election more accurate than they were four years ago, and quotes a number of political forecasters, including James E. Campbell, professor of political science.

11/5/04

An article in <i>USA Today</i> on the future of Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who is undergoing treatment for thyroid cancer, quotes Lee Albert, professor of law, on how Rehnquist will write opinions while working from home while he convalesces.

11/5/04

Christine Pelkman, assistant professor of nutrition, is quoted in the October issue of <i>Cooking Light</i> magazine in an article on the benefits of eating a moderate-fat diet.

11/8/04

An article in the <i>Baltimore Sun</i> on the impact the Internet had on the 2004 elections quotes James E. Campbell, professor of political science, on the role various media -- radio, television, cable and the Internet -- have played historically in presidential campaigns.

11/8/04

An article in the <i>Wilmington News Journal</i> about television's fascination with women in their domestic lives -- as seen in shows such as "Desperate Housewives," "Wife Swap" and "Trading Spouses" -- quotes Elayne Rapping, professor of American studies, who calls the shows a throwback to the 1950s and the images portrayed in the shows the reason women rebelled in the '60s.

11/11/04

An article on ESPN.com looks at the success Reggie Witherspoon has had building the men's basketball program from one that struggled at the bottom of the MAC to a team that has been dubbed the favorite in the conference's East Division.

11/14/04

An article in the <i>Daily Herald</i> on supermarket discount cards calls them good for business and buyers, and quotes Arun Jain, professor and chair of marketing, who said knowing who the customers are and what they are buying is critical to supermarkets, which receive roughly 80 percent of their revenue from 20 percent of their customers.

11/14/04

An column in the <i>Hartford Courant</i> looks at a theory floated 10 years ago by Lewis Mandell, professor of finance and managerial economics, who said states, Connecticut in particular, could benefit if the U.S. Supreme Court reversed Roe v. Wade because places like Connecticut would keep reproductive rights intact, giving progressive-minded people an incentive to relocate to, or remain a resident of, socially liberal states.

11/16/04

An Associated Press article that was picked up by about 20 outlets throughout the nation, including SportsIllustrated.com, looks at the men's basketball program, which is garnering a great deal of attention since it was picked to top the Mid-American Conference's East Division this year.

11/15/04

An article in the <i>Chronicle of Higher Education</i> reports on the Muschenheim Digital Archive, a Web project involving Kent Kleinman, chair of architecture, as well as librarians at Columbia University and the University of Michigan, that brings together the works of Austrian-born architect William Muschenheim.

11/17/04

An article by the Associated Press reports on UB research that found that people who live near border crossings have an increased risk of developing asthma. The article quotes Jamson Lwebuga-Mukasa, director of the Center for Asthma and Environmental Exposure.

11/17/04

Alan Lockwood, professor of neurology, was a guest last week on NPR's Science Friday for a show on the controversy over a new EPA study on pesticide exposures in young children.

11/22/04

An article in <i>Time</i> magazine reports on UB research that showed that the younger a person is when they have their first drink, the more likely they are to abuse alcohol as adults.

11/22/04

An article in <i>The Wall Street Journal</i> on Thanksgiving holiday travel reports on a UB study that showed that back-seat passengers who aren't wearing seatbelts are three times more likely to die in a head-on crash than belted passengers, and drivers are twice as likely to be killed if the passengers behind them aren't belted in.

11/23/04

An article in the <i>Chronicle of Higher Education</i> looks at the architecture and history of Buffalo's grain elevators and interviews Robert Shibley, professor and chair of architecture, and Lynda Schneekloth, professor of architecture, who share a vision of preserving this part of Buffalo's industrial past and making it a destination for some of the tourists who visit Niagara Falls each year.

11/29/04

An Associated Press article that looks at the work of snowflake photographer Wilson Bentley appears in today's issue of <i>USA Today</i>, as well as several other outlets throughout the Northeast, and reports that UB students created a digital library of a collection of Bentley's work in the Buffalo Museum of Science.

11/30/04

An article in <i>Wired</i> magazine reports the team behind Wikipedia is attempting to apply its collaborative information-gathering model to the news field, and quotes Alex Halavais, assistant professor of communication, who says "Wikinews" has a lot in common with other efforts at citizen journalism, but because of its collaborative editing process, should have a more neutral tone in the content of its stories.

11/29/04

An article in today's issue of <i>The Wall Street Journal</i> on entrepreneurs who lean heavily on credit cards when starting up their businesses quotes Lewis Mandell, professor of finance and managerial economics, who says the only situation in which an entrepreneur might consider racking up a lot of debt on a corporate cards is "if you have an almost-sure thing and just need to finance a couple months of credit in order to do production and finance receivables."