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Leadership, Strategy Among New Offerings by UB Center for Executive Development

By Jacqueline Ghosen

Release Date: October 16, 2002

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Seminars in leadership, strategy and negotiations, as well as a technical course in computer security, top the list of new professional-development offerings at the University at Buffalo School of Management.

Courtney J. Walsh, assistant dean and director of the School of Management's Center for Executive Development (CED), said the new programs were developed based on extensive market research.

"The needs of the business community are changing, and our programs are evolving to meet those needs," she explained.

"Companies and individuals are concerned about cost and time," Walsh added. "We designed these programs to give attendees what they want, whether it's customized or open enrollment classes, while giving participants a clear return on their investment."

A new seminar in the leadership series, "New Leadership Perspectives," focuses on how leadership competencies are associated with organizational change, vision and strategy. It is designed to help participants gain systematic insight into their own strengths and developmental needs as leaders -- and how to act on them.

"Negotiation Essentials" is a new seminar in the negotiation series. It covers topics such as distributive negotiation, negotiation style analysis, value distribution and strategic planning for negotiations. It also includes "hands-on" negotiation exercises.

"A unique aspect of both the leadership and negotiation seminars is the option of taking them with a coaching component, where the course instructor will work with the enrollee in an individualized session for up to three hours," said Walsh. "This is quite unlike most professional development seminars, which rely on participants to apply the concepts on their own. Participants can use this time to receive guidance and advice on individual leadership situations, challenges or issues."

Also new in the lineup of executive education are two modules in strategy. "Strategic Thinking: A Paradigm for Results" helps high-level managers diagnose and solve their firms' strategic challenges. The second module, "Strategic Action: Horsepower for Innovation," focuses on how to implement the plan developed in the first module.

A five-day technical course in computer security complements the new lineup. It revolves around the importance of taking an "active defense" approach to security; the need for risk assessment; the importance of documenting a return on security investment; corporate communication of security initiatives and guidelines for employees.

According to Walsh, the changes go beyond new seminars. "All of our courses are now offered at the North Campus in Amherst and at the Jacobs Executive Development Center downtown to make them more accessible," she said. "We've invested in new equipment, and we're building on the success of our Executive and Professional MBA programs by offering programs taught by faculty with consulting and executive training experience."

While the seminars are geared toward executive-level managers, Walsh notes that the CED offers a portfolio of programs for professionals in all stages of their careers who wish to enhance their skills and knowledge without enrolling in traditional degree or full-semester programs. Certificate programs are available for those who wish to take a series of seminars in particular management disciplines.

Tuition rates vary with most programs ranging from $600 to $1,500. For more information or to register for a program, call 645-3200 or go to http://www.mgt.buffalo.edu/ced.