Gender Markers and Pronouns

The University at Buffalo strives to provide as many resources as possible to allow individuals to be identified as they identify themselves. 

On June 8, 2022, the State University of New York (SUNY) Board of Trustees directed all 64 SUNY campuses, including UB, to update their policies regarding the use of a chosen name and pronouns to ensure that transgender, gender non-conforming, and non-binary students' identities are fully reflected and represented in campus systems. This historic change is the next step taken in SUNY's mission to create a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive environment for students within the LGBTQIA+ community.

The full announcement can be found on the SUNY website.

On this page:

Pronouns

Everyone has the right to be addressed and referred to by the chosen name and pronouns that correspond to their gender identity, including the use of non-binary pronouns (e.g., they/them).

Students can enter their pronouns into HUB and have those pronouns displayed in the system.

More information, including details about where pronouns appear in University systems, is available on the Office of the Registrar website.

Gender Markers

A gender marker represents an individual's gender identity, most commonly in the abbreviations F (female), M (male), or X (non-binary, intersex, or gender non-conforming). Some of UB's data systems have the ability to capture gender identity information in addition to legal sex demographic data.  

UB students can update their gender identity marker in the HUB Student Center under the biographical tab.  More information is available on the Office of the Registrar website

UB Faculty and Staff can update their gender marker in the on-line Employee Demographic Survey.  

Gender identity marker data is confidential personal information and may only be accessed by a limited number of users within the University.  

Salutation-Honorifics

According to the Oxford Dictionary, an honorific is a title or word implying or expressing respect.

Terms like Mr., Miss, Mrs. and Ms. are all honorifics traditionally based on gender or marital status.  Gendered honorifics become problematic for individuals who identify as non-binary.

The University is working toward including more gender-neutral honorific and salutation options in student and employee systems such as M. and Mx. 

Additional Resources