Research Fellows

1.

The Baldy Center is a focal point for the large group of scholars working on law, legal institutions, and social policy in the University at Buffalo community. The Center’s scholarly community is closely connected to regional, national, and global sociolegal scholars. Accordingly, the Center seeks to facilitate the work of scholars with law and policy related interests by linking them into the Baldy community and its substantial scholarly resources. The Baldy Center welcomes expressions of interest from all interested scholars and does its best to accommodate researchers whose interests complement those of UB faculty or address significant problems in law and social policy.

CURRENT RESEARCH FELLOWS

RESEARCH FELLOWS SINCE 2014

CURRENT RESEARCH FELLOWS

Matthew Bach

Matthew Bach.
Matthew Bach

Matthew Bach is researching the changing role of oil and gas firms in climate change governance with a focus on the factors driving their engagement, the positions that they are taking, and the mechanisms and pathways that they are deploying in relation to climate crisis governance. Since 2017, Matthew has been a governance programme officer for ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability, a global city network, where he leads a Horizon 2020 grant from the European Commission, which develops solutions for sustainable and just cities.

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Matthew Bach earned his MSc in Environmental Governance at the University of Freiburg in 2015, and is currently pursuing a PhD there under the guidance of SUNY Distinguished Professor Errol Meidinger. He is researching the changing role of oil and gas firms in climate change governance with a focus on the factors driving their engagement, the positions that they are taking, and the mechanisms and pathways that they are deploying in relation to climate crisis governance. His work has been featured in Environment and Environmental Politics, and builds on his earlier exploration of non-state governance arrangements in the extractive industries, which he has presented across the EU and the US, including at a Baldy Center workshop in 2014.

From 2015 to 2017, Matthew was a researcher at Erasmus University Rotterdam, where he coordinated large grants on translocal sustainability governance and edited a Springer volume on urban futures. Since 2017, Matthew has been a governance programme officer for ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability, a global city network, where he leads a prestigious Horizon 2020 grant from the European Commission, which develops solutions for sustainable and just cities. Matthew holds a Bachelors in Social Anthropology from the University of Cambridge (2005), and has worked across the Middle East and the former Soviet Union for international organizations and the private sector.

Daniel B. Ferreira

Daniel Brantes Ferreira.
Daniel Brantes Ferreira

Daniel Brantes Ferreira is a professor at Universidade Cândido Mendes and Vice-President for Academic affairs at the Brazilian Center of Arbitration and Mediation (CBMA), where he is an arbitrator. Daniel is also President of the Brazilian Bar Association, Rio de Janeiro Section, Legislative Affairs Commission. Research topics: legal theory, legal history, legal education, comparative studies, and Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR). Daniel is a partner at Bruno Freire Law Firm where he practices labor law and torts. At the Baldy Center he is researching American Legal Realism.

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Daniel Brantes Ferreira earned his PhD in Constitutional Law at the Pontifical University of Rio de Janeiro in 2011 and was a visiting scholar at UB Law School (2009) researching Legal Realism under the guidance of UB Distinguished Professor John Henry Schlegel. Having taught in several Law Schools in Rio de Janeiro, such as the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (2008-2009), FGV-Rio (2010), University Cândido Mendes (2012), Daniel became the Dean of Brazilian Institute of Capital Market Law School in 2014, where he worked also as a full professor until 2017. During this period, in 2016, he was awarded the Tiradentes Medal from the Legislative Assembly of Rio de Janeiro as recognition for his contribution to Rio de Janeiro’s legal education.

Currently Daniel is a professor at Universidade Cândido Mendes and Vice-President for Academic affairs at the Brazilian Center of Arbitration and Mediation (CBMA), where he is also an arbitrator. Daniel is also President of the Brazilian Bar Association, Rio de Janeiro Section, Legislative Affairs Commission. Moreover, he recently finished his post-doctoral research at the State University of Rio de Janeiro, where he wrote a paper comparing the judicial precedents system in the U.S and Brazil, and its use by arbitrators in both countries. Daniel’s main research publications are concentrated in the areas of legal theory, legal history, legal education, comparative studies, and Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR). Daniel is also partner at Bruno Freire Law Firm where he practices labor law and torts. At the Baldy Center he is engaged in researching American Legal Realism.

Jennifer L. Gaynor

Jennifer L. Gaynor.
Jennifer L. Gaynor

Jennifer L. Gaynor works on Southeast Asia and its surrounding seas from the seventeenth century to the present. The author of Intertidal History in Island Southeast Asia: Submerged Genealogy and the Legacy of Coastal Capture  (Cornell University Press, 2016), she has contributed chapters to a number of books, including Blue Legalities (Duke University Press, 2020), edited by Irus Braverman and Elizabeth R. Johnson. Building on her previous research, her current book projects examine the history of capture, slavery, and piracy in maritime Asia, as well as the recent history of global land reclamation.

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Jennifer L. Gaynor earned her PhD in History and Anthropology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and prior to coming to SUNY at Buffalo held fellowships at Michigan, Cornell, and the Australian National University. A scholar of Southeast Asia and its surrounding seas from the seventeenth century to the present, she is the author of Intertidal History in Island Southeast Asia: Submerged Genealogy and the Legacy of Coastal Capture (Cornell University Press, 2016).  Among other articles, she has written about amphibious political economy during the Spice Wars in the BEFEO (Bulletin de l'École française d'Extrême-Orient), has advanced cross-regional thinking about ages of sail in The Journal of World History,  and has theorized piracy through Southeast Asian history in Anthropological Quarterly

Gaynor has also contributed chapters to edited volumes, including, Seascapes: Maritime Histories, Littoral Cultures and Transoceanic Exchanges, edited by Jerry Bentley, Renate Bridenthal, and Kären Wigen (University of Hawai'i Press, 2007);  Early Modern East Asia: War, Commerce, and Cultural Exchange: Essays in Honor of John E. Wills, Jr., edited by Kenneth Swope and Tonio Andrade (Routledge, Asian States and Empires, 2017); and Blue Legalities: The Life and Laws of the Sea, edited by Irus Braverman and Elizabeth R. Johnson (Duke University Press, 2020). Current projects build on her previous research to examine both historical and contemporary dynamics of how coastal ecotones shape social, economic, and political relations, as well as how humans continue to reshape coasts.

Rachael K. Hinkle

Rachael K. Hinkle.
Rachael K. Hinkle

Rachael K. Hinkle earned her PhD in Political Science from Washington University in St. Louis and her J.D. from Ohio Northern University. She is currently an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. Her research agenda focuses on judicial politics with particular attention to gleaning insights into legal development from the content of judicial opinions through the use of computational text analytic techniques. This work is informed by her experience clerking for the Honorable David W. McKeague in the U.S. Court of Appeals and the Honorable Robert C. Broomfield in the U.S District Court.

Paul Linden-Retek

Paul Linden-Retek.
Paul Linden-Retek

Paul Linden-Retek is a UB Law Lecturer in Law & Society and a Research Fellow at the Baldy Center for Law & Social Policy. Paul earned his Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University in 2018 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 2012. He is a Schell Center Visiting Human Rights Fellow at Yale Law School. In 2019-20, Paul was a Post-doctoral Emile Noël Global Fellow at the Jean Monnet Center for International and Regional Economic Law & Justice, New York University School of Law.

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Paul Linden-Retek is a UB Law Lecturer in Law & Society and a Research Fellow at the Baldy Center for Law & Social Policy. Paul earned his Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University in 2018 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 2012. He is a Schell Center Visiting Human Rights Fellow at Yale Law School. In 2019-20, Paul was a Post-doctoral Emile Noël Global Fellow at the Jean Monnet Center for International and Regional Economic Law & Justice, New York University School of Law.

Paul’s research and teaching interests are in modern and contemporary political theory, international human rights, the study of constitutional democracy, and critical theory: in particular, questions of identity, pluralism, and citizenship; the legitimacy and ethics of borders; comparative constitutional law; the political philosophy of European integration; refugee and asylum law; and law and the humanities. His doctoral dissertation--The time of law: Europe’s crisis and the future of post-national constitutionalism--was awarded Yale University's James G. March Prize for an outstanding dissertation in any field of political science and nominated for the American Political Science Association’s William Anderson Award (best dissertation in the general field of federalism) and Edward S. Corwin Award (best dissertation in public law). 

At Yale, Paul has taught on the politics and theory of human rights, the moral foundations of politics, political philosophy, law and globalization, and public international law. In 2014, Paul helped found Yale's Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Human Rights Studies, in which he has advised participating students and co-taught the Program's introductory and capstone courses. 

Paul served previously as a legal adviser in the Human Rights Section, Office of the Government of the Czech Republic; the Legal Unit, International Civilian Office/EU Special Representative, Kosovo; and the EU Department, Ministry of the Environment of the Czech Republic. At Yale Law School, he was awarded the Jerome Sayles Hess Fund Prize for excellence in the field of international law and served as student director of the Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic. 

Paul's academic work has been published or is forthcoming in the International Journal of Constitutional Law, the Columbia Journal of European LawGlobal Constitutionalism, the Croatian Yearbook of European Law and Policy, and the Yale Journal of International Law; and his public writing has appeared in the Boston ReviewopenDemocracy, and Social Europe.

Charles J. Whalen

Charles J. Whalen.
Charles J. Whalen

Charles J. Whalen, an economist with a career spanning three decades, has contributed to national economic policy discussions, equitable regional development, and business success. During his appointment at the Baldy Center, Whalen has been active—as president (2018), past president (2019), and trustee (2020-)—in the Association for Evolutionary Economics. Last year, Whalens AFEE presidential address—on reclaiming the right to work as a progressive cause—appeared (in versions of varying length) in Buffalo Legal Studies Research Paper SeriesJournal of Economic Issues, and Challenge (an economics bimonthly). Whalen is currently editing two books.

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Charles J. Whalen, an economist with a career spanning three decades, has contributed to national economic policy discussions, equitable regional development, and business success based on employee involvement. He recently served six years in the Macroeconomic Analysis Division of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), where his contributions to reports and congressional testimony—on the slow growth of the U.S. economy, labor market challenges, and the economic effects of fiscal policy—were recognized by the agency’s highest honor, the CBO Director’s Award.

During his appointment as a Baldy visiting scholar, Charles Whalen has been active—as president (2018), past president (2019), and now trustee (2020-)—in the Association for Evolutionary Economics, an international group of scholars in the tradition of those who fashioned the New Deal and Great Society. He is currently editing two books that explore the frontiers of that tradition; his own chapters examine the notion of reasonable value and apply institutional law and economics to the problem of worker insecurity. Last year, Charles's AFEE presidential address—on reclaiming the right to work as a progressive cause—appeared (in versions of varying length) in Buffalo Legal Studies Research Paper SeriesJournal of Economic Issues, and Challenge (an economics bimonthly). His recent activities include: keynote speaker and paper presenter, Japan Association for Evolutionary Economics annual meeting (leading to a just-published article in Evolutionary and Institutional Economics Review); featured speaker, Law and Institutional Economics Workshop, Michigan State University; workshop presenter, Association for Promotion of Political Economy and the Law, University of Maryland School of Law; paper presenter and session organizer, AFEE annual meeting (leading to a forthcoming journal article on legal, financial, and historical justifications for the right to work); author of “Understanding Financialization,” a chapter in Alternative Approaches to Economic Theory (Routledge, 2020); and coauthor, with Katherine Whalen, of a critique of “sustainable” business models (highlighting the need for regulation and other public action), forthcoming in Journal of Economic Issues.

Whalen's recent activities include: keynote speaker and paper presenter, Japan Association for Evolutionary Economics annual meeting (leading to a just-published article in Evolutionary and Institutional Economics Review); featured speaker, Law and Institutional Economics Workshop, Michigan State University; workshop presenter, Association for Promotion of Political Economy and the Law, University of Maryland School of Law; paper presenter and session organizer, AFEE annual meeting (leading to a forthcoming journal article on legal, financial, and historical justifications for the right to work); author of “Understanding Financialization,” a chapter in Alternative Approaches to Economic Theory  (Routledge, 2020); and coauthor, with Katherine Whalen, of a critique of “sustainable” business models (highlighting the need for regulation and other public action), forthcoming in Journal of Economic Issues.

Prior to working at CBO, Charles served in academia, holding positions at Hobart & William Smith Colleges, the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College (where he partnered with Hyman Minsky), Cornell University, Zhongshan University in China (as a Fulbright professor), and most recently as professor of economics and executive director of business and economics programs at Utica College (which was then affiliated with Syracuse University). Skilled at writing about the economy, Charles also worked as associate economics editor at Business Week during the waning days of the dot-com boom and was the first commentator to call for a tax rebate to stimulate the sluggish economy in early 2001.

Charles has a solid record of scholarship in three broad areas: 1) fostering and sustaining U.S. economic growth and prosperity; 2) facilitating enterprise success and regional development by means of organizational change and stakeholder collaboration; and 3) exploring the contours of a more pluralistic economics, with special attention to the role of the state in the economy. His current research applies institutional law and economics to analyze America’s decades-long “silent depression,” characterized by widespread income stagnation, and to examine potential paths to a more sustainable prosperity.

Charles is a broadly trained economist, and his professional engagement is an expression of his interdisciplinary orientation. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from The University of Texas at Austin (where his dissertation was supervised by former U.S. Labor Secretary Ray Marshall of the LBJ School of Public Affairs) and a B.S. in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University. Since the 1980s, he has been active in the Labor and Employment Relations Association (LERA) and the Association for Evolutionary Economics (AFEE). In 2013, he received LERA’s Outstanding Practitioner Award (for contributions to research and practice in the field of employment relations); and in 2016, he was nominated to run unopposed as president-elect of AFEE. For over a decade, Charles has participated in the annual meetings of the Association of American Law Schools (Section on Socioeconomics) and law and economics workshops at law schools at the University of California (Berkeley), Georgetown University, and University at Buffalo (Baldy Center, May 2010). He has published in the Chapman Law Review.

Charles’s books include: Financial Instability and Economic Security after the Great Recession (Edward Elgar, 2011) and Political Economy for the 21st Century (M.E. Sharpe, 1996).

Refereed publications include:

  •  “Post-Keynesian Economics: A Pluralistic Alternative to Conventional Economics,” International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education Vol. 7, No. 1 (Spring 2016), pp. 23-38, commissioned for a series on pluralism and schools of economic thought;
  • “The Fiscal Multiplier and Economic Policy Analysis in the United States,” with F. Reichling, Contemporary Economic Policy Vol. 22, No. 4 (October 2015), pp. 735-746;
  • “Post-Keynesian Institutionalism after the Great Recession,” European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies Vol. 10, No. 1 (Spring 2013), pp. 12-27, lead article in a special issue on post-Keynesian and institutional political economy;
  • "Union Engagement in Western New York Economic Development: An Institutional Analysis,” Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations Vol. 18 (2011), pp. 177-213, winner of the publication’s annual Best Paper competition, co-sponsored by the Labor and Employment Relations Association;
  • “Minsky Goes to Buffalo—and Takes on the Economics Establishment,” Forum for Social Economics Vol. 40, No. 2 (Spring 2011), pp. 273-280; and
  • “Financialization and Income Inequality: A Post-Keynesian Institutionalist Analysis,” with D.A. Zalewski, Journal of Economic Issues Vol. 44, No. 3 (September 2010), pp. 757-777.

BALDY CENTER RESEARCH FELLOWS SINCE 2014

2014-2015

Kennedy G. Gastorn

Kennedy Godfrey Gastorn.

Kennedy Godfrey Gastorn

Kennedy Godfrey Gastorn was appointed Permanent Representative of the United Republic of Tanzania to the United Nations  in March, 2020. In his prior appointment, Gastorn was Secretary-General of the Asian-African Legal Consultative Organization in New Delhi, India. Following Gastorn's 2014-15 fellowship at the Baldy Center, he served as National Convenor for the Rule of Law Forum of his country’s International Development Law Organization.

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At the time of his Baldy Center Fellowship, Kennedy Gastorn was teaching law in the Department of Public Law at the University of Dar es Salaam School of Law, Tanzania, he is a co-founder and Coordinator of the Tanzanian-German Centre for Eastern African Legal Studies at the University of Dar es Salaam. He is also a Member of the National Environment Advisory Council (2012 – 2015) in the Vice President’s Office, United Republic of Tanzania, and an Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania, Notary Public and Commissioner for Oaths with a right of audience at the East Africa Court of Justice. From 2012 he also served as chairperson of the East African Committee of the Tanganyika Law Society, the National Bar Association. In this capacity, he advised the Ministry for East African Cooperation in legal matters pertaining to the East African Community. From 2012 to 2014 he also served as a National Coordinator of the Legal Sector Working Group (Development Partners) supporting the Legal Sector Reform Programme in Tanzania, based at the Canadian High Commission.

His areas of expertise and interest include regional integration law, land law, law reform, family law, environmental law and constitutional law. Kennedy holds an LL.B(Hons), LL.M from the University of Dar es Salaam, and a PhD from the University of Bayreuth in Germany.

He is currently a Fulbright scholar researching on the ‘The Efficacy of the East African Community Regime for Peace and Security in the Region’. In this context, he will be examining the recently concluded Protocols guiding cooperation in peace and security within the region and contemplates its efficacy to the existing and evolving security threats in the region, borrowing experiences from other similar regional frameworks, especially the SADC, ECOWAS and the African Union Peace and Security Architecture.

His recent publications in the area of regional integration in Africa include: Cross Border Legal Practice in the East African Community: Prospects and Challenges from the Tanzanian Position (2013); Constitutional Reform Processes and Integration of East Africa, (editor, et al),(2013); The Legal Analysis of the Common Market of the East African Community as Market Freedoms in the Open Market Economy” (2011); and Processes of Legal Integration in the East African Community (editor, et al), (2011).

2014-2015

Tricia Semmelhack

Tricia Semmelhack.

Tricia Semmelhack

Tricia Semmelhack entered private practice in mid-1970 with a focus on intellectual property, computer law and licensing. During her career, she co-founded and chaired the Intellectual Property Law Section of the NYS Bar Association. Having retired from her partnership at Hodgson Russ LLP, she has renewed her interest in international law with a close study of Hugo Grotius's famous work, The Law of War and Peace.

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Tricia Semmelhack received her JD (SUNY Buffalo '74) and entered private practice with a focus on intellectual property, computer law and licensing. Her earlier education (Brown University AB'60)and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (MA'61) focused on international relations. During her career, she co-founded and chaired the Intellectual Property Law Section of the NYS Bar Association, and presented numerous papers in the US and Canada on IP and computer issues. A special paper was given in China to the Shanghai Business Men's Association on the copyrightability of computer software when China was engaged in rampant piracy of US protected works. Having retired from her partnership at Hodgson Russ LLP, she has renewed her interest in international law with a close study of Hugo Grotius's famous work, The Law of War and Peace.

Fall 2015

Amber M. Adams

Amber Meadow Adams.

Amber Meadow Adams

Amber Meadow Adams, Ph.D. (American Studies, University at Buffalo). Research topics: Haudenosaunee narrative, ecology, and language; Mohawk Nation; Indigenous Knowledge; Schoodic Band of the Passamaquoddy Nation. As a visiting scholar at the Baldy Center, she conducted archival research on primary documents on the legal-economic matrices of women’s roles within Haudenosaunee government.

Fall 2015

Adam Wolkoff

Adam Wolkoff.

Adam Wolkoff 

Adam Wolkoff is a legal historian and attorney who practices labor and employment law at the firm of Bartlo, Hettler, Weiss & Tripi in Kenmore, New York. At the Baldy Center his work involved a project investigating social practices, court cases, and legislative debates arising from landlord-tenant relationships in the Old and New South and other regions of the nineteenth century United States.

2015-2018

Jennifer S. Hunt

Jennifer S. Hunt.

Jennifer S. Hunt

Jennifer S. Hunt served six terms as Coordinator of the Women and Gender Studies program. After the Baldy Fellowship, Jennifer accepted appointments the College of Law, University of Kentucky. Her work is published in a number of journals and books and been funded by the National Science Foundation. Research topics: empirical social psychology; juror decision making; character evidence; gender ideology. 

2017-2018

Ana M. Bacigalupo

Ana Mariella Bacigalupo.

Ana Mariella Bacigalupo

Ana Mariella Bacigalupo is a professor in the University at Buffalo Department of Anthropology. Research Topics: Medical anthropology; anthropology of religion; social theory; ethnomedicine; phenomenology; death and dying; self and personhood; shamanism; indigenous knowledge.

2017-2018

Catherine R. Connolly

Catherine R. Connolly.

Catherine R. Connolly

Professor Catherine Connolly is Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Wyoming (UW), where she served nine years as the department director.  Dr. Connolly earned a J.D. (cum laude, 1991) and a Ph.D. (Sociology, 1992) from the University at Buffalo. As a graduate student at UB, she was also a Baldy Center fellow.

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Always with an eye on social justice, Dr. Connolly’s research focuses on inequality and institutions, particularly the role of the state.  She published an article in the Wyoming Law Review (2011, Vol 11(1), pp. 125-63), “Gay Rights in Wyoming:  A Review of Federal and State Law,” with updated information in an invited book chapter, A Proud Heritage:  People, Issues and Documents of the LGBT Experience, Stewart, C, Ed. Santa Barbara:  ABC-CLIO; pp. 1237-46. She has published several policy papers on the economic status of women in Wyoming, the most recent, “The Wage Gap between Wyoming’s Men and Women: 2015” can be accessed through the Wyoming Women’s Foundation. In addition, Dr.  Connolly has won recognition for her teaching with college-level extraordinary merit awards and with recognition by graduating classes.

In 2008, Dr. Connolly was elected to serve in the Wyoming House of Representatives and continues to do so.  In this capacity, she currently serves on the Appropriations committee as well as several select committees. She has also served in caucus leadership, as well as on the Education, Judiciary, and Travel, Recreation, Wildlife and Cultural Resources committees.   Connolly  has been a strong advocate for prudent investment in social programs and for advancing women in leadership.  She is up for re-election in 2016.

Dr. Connolly is involved in two current research projects.  The first is an examination of the paths to serving and experiences of lesbians in elected office.  Using an intersectional lens, this work expands the existing literature on the relationship between descriptive and substantive representation in politics by including lesbians and queer women.

The second is Pathways from Prison, a collaborative project with faculty, students, and community members in conjunction with the state Department of Corrections .  We have interviewed over 70 currently and formerly incarcerated women with felony convictions regarding their experiences at the only prison in Wyoming for women, especially as related to successful transitioning in the state upon release.This work has resulted in a policy paper to the DOC, and a book manuscript is in progress.

Selected publications:

2016 The Wage Gap between Wyoming’s Men and Women: 2016, Wyoming Women’s Foundation (35pp.)

2015 with Susan Dewey, Bonnie Zare, Rhett Epler, & Rosemary Bratton, Findings from the “Pathways from Prison” Study. 2015, Report to the Wyoming Department of Corrections.

2015 Gay Rights in Wyoming, invited book chapter, A Proud Heritage: People, Issues and Documents of the LGBT Experience, Stewart, C, Ed.. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO; pp. 1237-46.

2015 with Aimee Van Cleave and Melanie Vigil. Gay Rights in New Mexico invited book chapter, A Proud Heritage: People, Issues and Documents of the LGBT Experience, Stewart, C, Ed.. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO; pp. 1090-1100.

2011 “Gay Rights in Wyoming: A Review of Federal and State Law.” Wyoming Law Review, Vol. 11(1), pp. 125-63.

2010 with Katrina Brown. “The Role of Law in Promoting Women in Elite Athletics: An Examination of Four Nations.” International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Vol. 45, No.1, pp. 3-22.

2009 “Gay and Lesbian Families Around the Globe: An examination of gender, citizenship and the law,” in Genero, Ciudadania y Globalizacion (eds. Mar Gallego Duran, Rosa Garcia Gutierrez, and Rosa Giles Carnero), Ediciones Alfar, Sevilla, Spain, pp. 233-249.

Spring 2019

Amanda Hughett

Amanda Hughett.

Amanda Hughett

Amanda Hughett, PhD (U Illinois at Springfield Legal sSudies) came to the Baldy Center as a Postdoctoral Fellow, 2017-18, following her work as a Law and Social Sciences Doctoral Fellow at the American Bar Foundation. Hughett's work illuminates the limitations of individual rights claims in the postwar era while helping to explain why American prisons continue to punish more harshly than their counterparts in any Western country. At the Baldy Center, Amanda worked on a manuscript tentatively titled, Silencing the Cell Block.

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Amanda Hughett, Baldy Center Postdoctoral Fellow,2017-18, was previously a Law and Social Sciences Doctoral Fellow at the American Bar Foundation. Earning a Ph.D. in History at Duke University, August 2017, her dissertation documents how civil liberties lawyers’ efforts to secure procedural protections for inmates during the 1970s unintentionally undermined imprisoned activists’ ability to organize and to secure more substantive victories. It begins by tracing the emergence of a surprisingly successful interracial movement to unionize incarcerated workers in North Carolina and across the nation. The project then reveals how prison administrators who at first opposed procedural protections for inmates used them, once created, to defeat prisoners’ more sweeping demands by portraying their institutions as modern bureaucracies that complied with the rule of law.

In so doing, Hughett's work illuminates the limitations of individual rights claims in the postwar era while helping to explain why American prisons continue to punish more harshly than their counterparts in any Western country. At the Baldy Center, Amanda will revise her dissertation into a book manuscript tentatively titled Silencing the Cell Block: The Making of Modern Prison Policy in North Carolina and the Nation.

Hughett's paper, "'A Hazardous Enterprise': Prisoners' Rights Lawyers' Quest for Justice Beyond the Courtroom" was presented at the Baldy Center on November 10, 2017.