Demographic Information

Self-ID Frequently Asked Questions

Why am I being asked about my race and ethnicity?

The University at Buffalo is required by federal law to collect this information.

Am I required to provide this information?

No.  Completion of the survey is voluntary. 

How do I access the survey?

You can access the survey from:

The MyUB page - link located under the My Opinion section

The Administrative Services Gateway - Link under the Tell UB About Yourself

The Employee Demographic Self-ID survey

 

If you have difficulties accessing the survey, please call the Office of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (EDI) at (716) 645-2266.

 

What does UB do with the information in the survey?

UB collects the information for use in mandatory federal reporting, including the University’s Affirmative Action Plan.  We also use the information to determine on an aggregate basis information about UB’s diversity, and where we can augment efforts to recruit and retain a diverse workforce.

Who has access to this information?

The information you provide can be accessed only by individuals within Human Resources, the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, and a limited number of other offices where job duties require use of the information.  This information is not released except as necessary to fulfill legitimate University objectives.

Why is “Hispanic/Latino” not listed as a race category?

The federal government considers “Hispanic/Latino” to be a national origin category, and not a race category.  Under the new guidelines, an individual can be Hispanic/Latino AND white, for example, or Hispanic/Latino AND black/African American.  The federal government requires us first to ask whether employees are Hispanic/Latino, and then to ask employees to identify their race.

Who counts as “Hispanic/Latino”?

A "Hispanic or Latino" person is of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term "Spanish origin" can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."

What are the current race categories?

The current federal categories are:

White - having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa

Black or African American - having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa

Asian - having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent, including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam

American Indian or Alaska Native – having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands

 

What if I have origins in more than one race category?

You may select as many race categories as apply.

What happens if I don’t update my race or national origin?

UB will continue to use the information you previously provided.

Why is this survey asking whether I have a disability?

Federal law requires federal contractors to ensure that they are taking affirmative steps to recruit and hire individuals with disabilities.  In 2014, the federal government instituted new requirements that include a periodic resurvey of employees to determine disability status. 

What is considered to be a “disability”?

You are considered to have a disability if you have a physical or mental impairment or medical condition that substantially limits a major life activity, or if you have a history or record of such an impairment or medical condition.  This includes both disabilities that may be apparent to others (ex. a condition requiring the use of a wheelchair or other assistive device) and “hidden” disabilities (ex. major depression, diabetes, epilepsy). 

A condition would meet the definition of disability if, on either a regular or intermittent basis, it affects common activities of daily life, which could include (but are not limit to) caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, eating, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating, and working.

I am concerned about others knowing if I have a disability. Do I have to disclose this?

You are not required to disclose information about your disability.  Please be assured, however, that if you do disclose this information in the self-identification survey, the information will be strictly confidential and will not be shared with your supervisor, manager or others within your department.  Additionally, no one at the University can treat you adversely or take any action against you for having a disability.  With your permission, this information may be shared with emergency management personnel if you require evacuation assistance in the event of an emergency.

My disability doesn’t really affect my work. Can I still report it?

Yes.  As long as your disability affects any major life activity, you still may report it.

Why is the survey asking about veteran status?

Federal contractors are required to take affirmative steps to recruit and hire protected veterans.  In 2014, the federal government instituted new requirements that include a periodic resurvey of employees’ veteran status.

What are the new categories for protected veterans? Why don’t other veterans count for purposes of the survey?

The federal government defines “protected veterans” under the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA), which was originally passed in 1974.  It has since updated the definition of “protected veterans” to include the following categories:

  • ARMED FORCES MEDAL VETERAN—Any veteran who, while serving on active duty in the U.S. military, ground, naval or air service, participated in a United States military operation for which an Armed Forces service medal was awarded pursuant to Executive Order 12985.
  • DISABLED VETERAN—A veteran of the U.S. military, ground, naval, or air service who is entitled to compensation (or who but for the receipt of military retired pay would be entitled to compensation) under the laws administered by the Secretary of Veteran Affairs, or a person who was discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability.
  • ACTIVE DUTY WARTIME OR CAMPAIGN BADGE VETERAN—A veteran who served on active duty in the U.S. military, ground, naval, or air service during a war or in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized, under the laws administered by
  • RECENTLY SEPERATED VETERANS:  Any veteran during the three-year period beginning on the date of such veteran's discharge or release from active duty in the U.S. military, ground, naval, or air service.

For purposes of the survey, UB must comply with the definition of “protected veteran” provided by the federal government.

 

When will I be asked to complete the survey?

- Pre-Offer

Applicants are invited to self-identify during the application process.

- Post-Offer

After an offer of employment, but before beginning work, individuals will be invited to self identify.

- Current Employees

Employees are invited to self-identify using the on-line survey.

 

You can access the survey from:

The MyUB page - link located under the My Opinion section

The Administrative Services Gateway - Link under the Tell UB About Yourself

The Employee Demographic Self-ID survey

 

If you have difficulties accessing the survey, please call the Office of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (EDI) at (716) 645-2266.

Who do I contact if I have questions?

Please call the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at (716) 645-2266.