Events

Mathematics Research.

The Department of Mathematics is pleased to host a variety of events throughout the year. For additional information about our seminars, lectures, colloquia, and related activities, please call (716) 645-6284 or contact us via general inquiry email: mathematics@buffalo.edu

Thank you for your interest in our events.

2024 Seminars and Colloquia

Join us this for math seminars and special events, listed below.
Click title to reveal seminar abstract.

Wed, Feb 28

Analysis Seminar
Mohan Ramachandran, SUNY at Buffalo
Maximal Spectrum, Stone Cech, and Stone Weierstrass theorems
4:00PM, 250 Math Building


Mon, Mar 4

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Marie Trin (Institut Mathématiques de Rennes)
TBA
4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Fri, Mar 8

Applied Math Seminar
Esteban Vargas Bernal, Arisona State University
InfoMap for absorbing random walks.

3:00PM, Math 122


Fri, Mar 15

Applied Math Seminar
Alexandr Chernyavskiy, UB
TBA.

3:00PM, Math 122


Fri, Mar 15

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Jonathan Hanselman (Princeton)
TBA

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Fri, Mar 29

Geometry and Topology Seminar
TBA
4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Fri, Apr 12

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Indira Chatterji (University of Côte d'Azur / Fields Institute)
TBA
4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Fri, Apr 19

Applied Math Seminar
Anna Vainchtein, University of Pittsburgh
TBA.

3:00PM, Math 122 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Wed, Apr 24

Colloquium
Tomasz Mrowka, MIT
2023-24 Myhill Lecture #1
4:00PM


Thu, Apr 25

Colloquium
Tomasz Mrowka, MIT
2023-24 Myhill Lecture #2
4:00PM


Fri, Apr 26

Colloquium
Tomasz Mrowka, MIT
2023-24 Myhill Lecture #3
4:00PM


Fri, May 3

Applied Math Seminar
Willy Hereman, Colorado School of Mines
TBA.

3:00PM, Math 122 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Related Links

Fall 2023 AMS Sectional Meeting

PAST EVENTS

2023 Math Seminars


Fri, Feb 3

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Morgan Weiler (Cornell University)
ECH cobordism maps and infinite staircases of 4D symplectic embeddings
4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Feb 13

Applied Math Seminar
Jiyoung Kang, Pukyong National University
Brain Dynamics and its Control: Computational Approaches

2:00PM, Math 250 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Mon, Feb 13

Algebra Seminar
Yiqiang Li, University at Buffalo
Quantum groups and edge contraction

4:00PM, 250 Math Bldg


Thu, Feb 16

Special Event
Solitons and the inverse scattering transform: an overview
 Solitons and the inverse scattering  transform: an overview.AbstractAn exciting and extremely active area of research investigation is the study of solitons and the nonlinear partial differential equations that describe them. In this talk, we will discuss what solitons are, and what makes them so special. We will see when the first solitons were observed, and when the first math that describe them appeared. We will introduce ourselves to integrable systems, and we will describe how the technique of the inverse scattering transform is applied in soliton theory.  If time permits, we will give some examples of integrable systems and we will discuss their applications.  
4:00PM

Title: Solitons and the inverse scattering  transform: an overview.

AbstractAn exciting and extremely active area of research investigation is the study of solitons and the nonlinear partial differential equations that describe them. In this talk, we will discuss what solitons are, and what makes them so special. We will see when the first solitons were observed, and when the first math that describe them appeared. We will introduce ourselves to integrable systems, and we will describe how the technique of the inverse scattering transform is applied in soliton theory.  If time permits, we will give some examples of integrable systems and we will discuss their applications. 

 


Fri, Feb 17

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Yvon Verberne (University of Toronto)
Automorphisms of the fine curve graph

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Mar 6

Algebra Seminar
Bangming Deng, Tsinghua U
Fourier transforms on Ringel-Hall algebras
4:00PM, Zoom - contact achirvas@buffalo.edu for link


Mon, Mar 13

Applied Math Seminar
Weinan Wang, University of Arizona
Recent progress on the well-posedness theory for some kinetic models

2:00PM, Math 250 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Fri, Mar 17

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Assaf Bar-Natan (Brandeis University)
How the Thurston metric on Teichmuller space is (not) like L^(infty)

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Mar 27

Algebra Seminar
Guanglian Zhang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Every type-A quiver locus is a Kazhdan-Lusztig variety

9:00AM, Note unusual time. On Zoom (please email achirvas@buffalo.edu)

 


Mon, Mar 27

Applied Math Seminar
Qingguo Hong, Penn State
A priori error analysis and greedy training algorithms for neural networks solving PDEs.

2:00PM, Math 250 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Fri, Mar 31

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Yuan Yao (UC Berkeley)
Computing embedded contact homology in Morse-Bott settings

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Apr 3

Algebra Seminar
Mariusz Tobolski, University of Wroclaw
Cohomology of free unitary quantum groups 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building room 250

 

In this talk, I will present the Hochschild and bialgebra cohomology with 1-dimensional coefficients of the \(*\)-algebras associated with free universal unitary quantum groups. The result is based on the free resolution of the counit of the free orthogonal quantum groups found by Collins, Härtel, and Thom which was then generalized by Bichon to the case of quantum groups associated with a nondegenerate bilinear form. In fact, we compute cohomology groups of the universal cosovereign Hopf algebras, which generalize free unitary quantum groups and are connected to quantum groups of non-degenerate bilinear forms. This is a joint work with U. Franz, M. Gerhold,A. Wysocza\'nska-Kula, and I. Baraquin.

 

 


Mon, Apr 10

Algebra Seminar
Robert Corless, Western University
Bohemian Matrix Geometry 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building room 250

 

A Bohemian matrix family is a set of matrices all of whose entries are drawn from a fixed, usually discrete and hence bounded, subset of a field of characteristic zero. Originally these were  integers---hence the name, from the acronym BOunded HEight Matrix of Integers(BOHEMI)---but other kinds of entries are also interesting. Some kinds of questions about Bohemian matrices can be answered by numerical computation, but sometimes exact computation is better. In this paper we explore some Bohemianfamilies                  (symmetric, upper Hessenberg, or Toeplitz) computationally, and answer some (formerly) open questions posed about the distributions of eigenvalue densities.

 

This work connects with several disparate areas of mathematics, including dynamical systems, combinatorics, probability and statistics, and number theory.  Because the thinking about the topic is so recent, most of the material is still quite exploratory, and this talk will be accessible to students as well as to faculty.  Several open problems remain open, and I would welcome your thoughts on them.

 

This is joint work with several people, including EuniceY.S. Chan, Leili Rafiee Sevyeri, Neil J. Calkin, Piers W. Lawrence, Laureano Gonzalez-Vega, Dan Piponi, Juana Sendra, and Rafael Sendra.

 


Fri, Apr 14

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Nima Hoda (Cornell University)
Normed polyhedral complexes and nonpositive curvature
4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Apr 17

Algebra Seminar
Jacopo Zanchettin, SISSA
Hopf algebroids and twists for quantum projectivespaces 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building room 250

 

The Ehresmann-Schauenburg (E-S) bialgebroid associatedwith a Hopf-Galois extension is the noncommutative analog of the gauge groupoidassociated with a principal bundle. As for a Hopf algebra, a Hopf algebroid isa bialgebroid with an invertible antipode. In this talk, after recalling somebasic notions about rings, coring, and bialgebroids, we first show how twists(a sub-group of characters) of a bialgebroid are related to antipodes in thegeneral case. Eventually, after a short introduction to Hopf-Galois extensions,we characterize them for the E-S bialgebroid. Finally, we work out the exampleof a family of \(O(U(1))\)-extensions over quantum projective spaces. This talkis based on joint work with L. Dabrowski and G. Landi arXiv:2302.12073

 


Fri, Apr 21

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Vasudevan Srinivas (Tata Institute)
What is the Hodge Conjecture?

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Apr 24

Algebra Seminar
Ana Agore, Max Planck Institut and Simion Stoilow Institute of Mathematics
Universal constructions for Poisson algebras. Applications. 
9:00AM, Zoom (please email achirvas@buffalo.edu)

 

We introduce the universal algebra of two Poisson algebras \(P\) and \(Q\) as a commutative algebra \(A := \mathcal{P}(P, Q)\) satisfying a certain universal property. The universal algebra is shown to exist for any finite-dimensional Poisson algebra \(P\) and several of its applications are highlighted. For any Poisson \(P\)-module \(U\), we construct a functor \(U\otimes-: {}_A\mathcal{M} \to {}_Q\mathcal{PM}\) from the category of \(A\)-modules to the category of Poisson \(Q\)-modules which has a left adjoint whenever \(U\) is finite-dimensional. Similarly, if \(V\) is an \(A\)-module, then there exists another functor \(-\otimes V:{}_P\mathcal{PM}\to {}_Q\mathcal{QM}\) connecting the categories of Poisson representations of \(P\) and \(Q\) and the latter functor also admits a left adjoint if \(V\) is finite-dimensional. If \(P\) is\(n\)-dimensional, then \(\mathcal{P}(P) := \mathcal{P}(P, P)\) is the initial object in the category of all commutative bialgebras coacting on \(P\). As an algebra,\(\mathcal{P}(P)\) can be described as the quotient of the polynomial algebra\(k[X_{ij} | i, j = 1, · · · , n]\) through an ideal generated by \(2n^3\)non-homogeneous polynomials of degree \(\le 2\). Two applications are provided. The first one describes the automorphisms group\(\mathrm{Aut}_{\mathrm{Poiss}}(P)\) as the group of all invertible group-like elements of the finite dual \(\mathcal{P}(P)^{\circ}\).  Secondly, we show that for an abelian group\(G\), all \(G\)-gradings on \(P\) can be explicitly described and classified in terms of the universal coacting bialgebra \(\mathcal{P}(P)\). Joint work with G.Militaru.

 


Mon, Apr 24

Applied Math Seminar
Boaz Ilan, UC Merced
NLS equations: solitons, dispersive shocks and singularity formation.

2:00PM, Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Wed, Apr 26

Analysis Seminar
Min Woong Ahn, SUNY at Buffalo
The error-sum function of Pierce expansions
4:00PM, 250 Math Building


Thu, Apr 27

Colloquium
Bena Tshishiku (Brown University)
Mapping class groups and Nielsen realization problems

4:00PM, 250 Mathematics Building


Fri, Apr 28

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Bena Tshishiku (Brown University)
Pseudo-Anosov theory in the Goeritz group

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, May 1

Algebra Seminar
Michael Brannan, University of Waterloo
Ulam stability for quantum groups 
4:00PM, 250 Mathematics Building

 

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the study of approximate representations of various algebraic structures. This is due to some very deep connections with (1) approximation properties for groups and (2) questions about robustness in quantum information theory. The basic question that we are interested in is the following: If we are given a linear map from an algebra (or group) into the bounded operators on a Hilbert space that is “almost” multiplicative, under what conditions can we guarantee that this map is a small perturbation of an actual representation of the algebra? I will describe some of the history around this problem as well as some on going work with Junichiro Matsuda (Kyoto) and Jennifer Zhu (Waterloo), where we investigate the Ulam (=operator norm) stability of approximate representations for compact and discrete quantum groups.

 


Wed, May 3

Analysis Seminar
Daxun Wang. SUNY at Buffalo
Boundary actions of groups and their C*-algebras
4:00PM, 250 Math Building


Fri, May 12

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Adam Sikora (University at Buffalo)
On skein modules of rational homology spheres

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Wed, Sep 6

Analysis Seminar
Jintao Deng, SUNY at Buffalo
The equivariant coarse Baum-Connes conjecture
4:00PM, 250 Mth Building


Thu, Sep 7

Colloquium
Demonstration of new GRADER app
4:00PM, Room 250


Mon, Sep 11

Algebra Seminar
Peter Koroteev, University at Buffalo
Opers and integrability
4:00PM, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA


Wed, Sep 13

Analysis Seminar
Jintao Deng, SUNY at Buffalo
The equivariant coarse Baum-Connes conjecture Part II
4:00PM, 250 Math Building


Mon, Sep 18

Algebra Seminar
Tomasz Maszczyk, University of Warsaw
Quantum symmetries of Frobenius algebras
4:00PM, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA

 


Wed, Sep 20

Analysis Seminar
Min Woong Ahn, SUNY at Buffalo
Hausdorff dimensions in Pierce expansions
4:00PM, 250 Math Building


Fri, Sep 22

Applied Math Seminar
Jiuhua Hu, University of Wisconsin at Madison
Wavelet-based Edge Multiscale Parareal Algorithm for Parabolic Equations with Heterogeneous Coefficients.

3:00PM, Math 122 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Mon, Sep 25

Algebra Seminar
Gigel Militaru, University of Bucharest
The set-theoretic quantum Yang-Baxter equation: new perspectives and strategies
4:00PM, Zoom only (please email achirvas@buffalo.edu)

Joint work with Ana Agore and Alexandru Chirvasitu.

 


Thu, Sep 28

Colloquium
Xuhua He, University of Hong Kong
Machine learningassisted exploration for affine Deligne-Lusztig varieties Speaker host: Yiqiang Li
10:00AM, Via zoom link: https://buffalo.zoom.us/j/98322986435?pwd=OE5OZTVEcE1BZmNuZmYrdmhUNVk4UT09

Speaker: XuhuaHe,  University of Hong Kong

Title: Machine learningassisted exploration for affine Deligne-Lusztig varieties

 

Speaker host: Yiqiang Li


Fri, Sep 29

Applied Math Seminar
Ming Zhong, Illinois Institute of Technology
Learning Collective Behaviors from Observation.

3:00PM, Math 122 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Fri, Oct 13

Applied Math Seminar
Nick Moore, Colgate University
TBA.

3:00PM, Math 122 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Fri, Oct 13

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Ivan Dynnikov (Steklov Mathematical Institute of RAS)
An algorithm for comparing Legendrian links
 

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Oct 16

Algebra Seminar
Gurbir Dhillon, Yale
Sheaves on semi-infinite flag manifolds and Langlands duality Abstract : Let \(G\), \(G^L\) be Langlands-dual reductive groups. The geometric Satake equivalence is the wonderful fact that one can realize the monoidal category of \(G^L\)-representations as a category of constructible sheaves on a space built from \(G\), namely its affine Grassmannian. After recalling this story, we will present similar realizations of the representations of every parabolic and Levi subgroup of \(G^L\) as sheaves on the semi-infinite partial flag manifolds of \(G\). Time permitting, we will describe some natural extensions, including the realizations of the representations of various quantum groups. The contents of this talk build on work and conjectures of many people, notably Arkhipov, Bezrukavnikov, Braverman, Feigin, Finkelberg, Frenkel, Gaitsgory, Lusztig, Mirkovic, Vilonen, and Raskin, and is the subject of work in progress with Campbell, Chen, Lysenko, and Achar-Riche. 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building, room 250

Title: Sheaves on semi-infinite flag manifolds and Langlands duality

 

Abstract : Let \(G\), \(G^L\) be Langlands-dual reductive groups. The geometric Satake equivalence is the wonderful fact that one can realize the monoidal category of \(G^L\)-representations as a category of constructible sheaves on a space built from \(G\), namely its affine Grassmannian. After recalling this story, we will present similar realizations of the representations of every parabolic and Levi subgroup of \(G^L\) as sheaves on the semi-infinite partial flag manifolds of \(G\). Time permitting, we will describe some natural extensions, including the realizations of the representations of various quantum groups.

 

The contents of this talk build on work and conjectures of many people, notably Arkhipov, Bezrukavnikov, Braverman, Feigin, Finkelberg, Frenkel, Gaitsgory, Lusztig, Mirkovic, Vilonen, and Raskin, and is the subject of work in progress with Campbell, Chen, Lysenko, and Achar-Riche.

 


Tue, Oct 17

Applied Math Seminar
Ruth López Fajardo, Florida State
From Data to Insights: Permeability Estimation with a Direct Filter
 
Abstract : In this study, we implement a computational method for the estimation of permeability values within a defined spatial domain based on observed fluid pressure distributions. Our methodology frames the problem as an inverse problem where the Forward Model, responsible for generating the observed data, is solved using a Locally Conservative Enriched Galerkin Solver for Elliptic and Parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs). The parameter estimation process is then addressed with a Bayesian framework, treating it as an on-line problem, which is subsequently solved by the Direct filter method.
2:00PM, Math 122


Wed, Oct 18

Analysis Seminar
Francesc Perera, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona
Traces on ultrapowers of C*-algebras
4:00PM, 250 Math Building


Thu, Oct 26

Colloquium
Lei Yang, Institute for Advanced Study
Effective versions of Ratner’s equidistribution theorem
4:00PM, Mathematics Building, room 250


Mon, Oct 30

Algebra Seminar
Bach Nguyen, Xavier University
: Poisson geometry and the representation theory of cluster algebras 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building room 250

 


Wed, Nov 1

Analysis Seminar
Jinmin Wang, Texas A&M University
Stoker's problem and index theory on manifolds with polytope singularities
4:00PM, 250 Math Building


Fri, Nov 3

Applied Math Seminar
Yijun Sun, UB
Machine learning approaches to cancer progression modeling and cancer driver gene detection.

3:00PM, Math 122 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Mon, Nov 6

Algebra Seminar
Leonid Rybnikov, MIT/Montreal
The Gaudin model in the Deligne category Rep\(GL_t\) 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building Room 250

 


Fri, Nov 10

Applied Math Seminar
Dmitry Pelinovsky, Mcmaster University
Instability of peaked waves in hydrodynamical models.

3:00PM, Math 122 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Mon, Nov 13

Algebra Seminar
Changlong Zhong, Albany
Elliptic cohomology and the Fourier-Mukai transform 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building Room 250

 


Fri, Nov 17

Applied Math Seminar
Giselle Sosa Jones, Oakland University
Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of multiphase flow problems in porous media.

3:00PM, Math 122 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Mon, Nov 27

Algebra Seminar
Pablo Boixeda Alvarez, Yale
The center of the small quantum group and affineSpringer fibers Abstract : The quantum group \(U_q\) is a Hopf algebraintroduced by Lusztig deforming the enveloping algebra. The representationtheory of this algebra is particularly interesting at \(l^{th}\) roots of unity,where it includes a finite-dimensional subalgebra known as the small quantumgroup.  In joint work with Bezrukavnikov,Shan and Vasserot we construct an injective map to the center of this algebrafrom the cohomology of a certain affine Springer fiber \(\cF{l}_{ts}\) for aregular semisimple element \(s\). In recent progress we check that this map issurjective in type A and get a bound on dimension in general types related tothe diagonal coinvariant algebra. We also give an algebro-geometric descriptionof the spectrum of the cohomology of the Springer fiber. The work relies onunderstanding the representation category through a filtration coming fromintersection with \(G[[t]]\)-orbits in \(\cF{l}_{ts}\) . In this talk I willpresent the result and related properties of this filtration of the category.
4:00PM, Mathematics Building room 250

Speaker:  PabloBoixeda Alvarez, Yale

 

Title: The center of the small quantum group and affineSpringer fibers

 

Abstract : The quantum group \(U_q\) is a Hopf algebraintroduced by Lusztig deforming the enveloping algebra. The representationtheory of this algebra is particularly interesting at \(l^{th}\) roots of unity,where it includes a finite-dimensional subalgebra known as the small quantumgroup.  In joint work with Bezrukavnikov,Shan and Vasserot we construct an injective map to the center of this algebrafrom the cohomology of a certain affine Springer fiber \(\cF{l}_{ts}\) for aregular semisimple element \(s\). In recent progress we check that this map issurjective in type A and get a bound on dimension in general types related tothe diagonal coinvariant algebra. We also give an algebro-geometric descriptionof the spectrum of the cohomology of the Springer fiber. The work relies onunderstanding the representation category through a filtration coming fromintersection with \(G[[t]]\)-orbits in \(\cF{l}_{ts}\) . In this talk I willpresent the result and related properties of this filtration of the category.


Mon, Dec 4

Algebra Seminar
Hunter Dinkins, Northeastern
q-Hypergeometric Functions and the Geometry of Quiver Varieties 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building room 250

 


Mon, Dec 11

Algebra Seminar
Yan Soibelman, Kansas State
Perturbative expansions in Chern-Simons theory from the point of view of Holomorphic Floer Theory 
4:00PM, Zoom (please email achirvas@buffalo.edu)

 

HFT has many applications e.g. the unifying point of view on the Riemann-Hilbert correspondence.  I am going to explain an application to exponential integrals in finite and infinite dimensions.  In the case of Chern-Simons theory this leads to several interesting conjectures, including the one about the existence of a mixed Hodge structure of infinite rank associated to a complexified Chern-Simons functional.

 

2022 Math Seminars


Tue, Feb 22

Applied Math Seminar
Applied Math Seminar: Alexander Korotkevich (UNM)
Numerical Verification of the 6-Wave 1D Kinetic Equation.Speaker: Alexander Korotkevich (University of New Mexico, Department of Math&Stat)
4:00PM, Zoom


Fri, Feb 25

Special Event
Makoto Ozawa (Komazawa University) via Zoom only Friday

4:00PM



Tue, Mar 1

Applied Math Seminar
Applied Math Seminar
Denis Silantyev (UCCS)
Generalized Constantin-Lax-Majda Equation: Collapse vs. Blow Up and Global ExistenceSpeaker: Denis Silantyev (UC Colorado Springs, Department of Mathematics)
4:00PM, Zoom


Tue, Mar 8

Applied Math Seminar
Dr. Kai Yang, Florida International University
Numerical methods for the KdV-type equations
4:00PM, Zoom: for link see email announcement or contact sergeyd at buffalo dot edu


Thu, Mar 10

Colloquium
Cary Malkiewich, Binghamton University
Brave new fixed-point theory
4:00PM, Zoom: for link see email announcement or contact badzioch at buffalo dot edu


Mon, Mar 14

Algebra Seminar
Benjamin Passe, United States Naval Academy
Boundary representations and isolated points
4:00PM, Zoom. Contact achirvas AT buffalo DOT edu for link.


Tue, Mar 15

Applied Math Seminar
Pavel Lushnikov, University of New Mexico
Conformal mappings and integrability of surface dynamics
4:00PM, Zoom: for link contact sergeyd@buffalo.edu


Fri, Mar 18

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Subhankar Dey, University of Alabama
Detection results in link Floer homology

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Thu, Mar 31

Colloquium
Colloquium: Michael Brannan (University of Waterloo)Via Zoom
4:00PM


Fri, Apr 1

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Hong Chang, University at Buffalo
 Efficient geodesics in the curve complex and their dot graphs

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Thu, Apr 7

Special Event
Colloquium: Gino Biondini, University at Buffalo
Two adventures in integrable systems: thenonlinear Schrodinger equation with non-trivial boundary conditions 
4:00PM, Room 250 Math Building, North Campus

A significant advance in mathematical physics in thesecond half of the twentieth century was the development of the theory ofmodern integrable systems. These systems are nonlinear evolution equations ofphysical significance that provide the nonlinear counterpart to the classicalPDEs of mathematical physics.

One such equation, and in some respects the mostimportant one, is the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. The NLS equation isa universal model for weakly nonlinear dispersive wave packets, and arises in avariety of physical settings, including deep water, optics, acoustics, plasmas,condensed matter, etc. In addition, the NLS equation is a completelyintegrable, infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system, and as a result itpossesses a remarkably deep and beautiful mathematical structure. At the rootof many of these properties is the existence of Lax pair, namely the fact thatthe NLS equation can be written as the compatibility condition of anoverdetermined pair of linear ODEs. The first half of the Lax pair for the NLSequation is the Zakharov-Shabat scattering problem, which is equivalent to aneigenvalue problem for a one-dimensional Dirac operator.

 

Even though the NLS equation has been extensively studiedthroughout the last sixty years, it continues to reveal new phenomena and offermany surprises. In particular, the focusing NLS equation with nontrivialboundary conditions has received renewed attention in recent years. This talkis devoted to presenting two recent results in this regard. Specifically, Iwill discuss: (i) A characterization of the universal nonlinear stage ofmodulational instability, achieved by studying the long-time asymptotics ofsolutions of the NLS equation with non-zero background; (ii) A characterizationof a two-parameter family of elliptic finite-band potentials of thenon-self-adjoint ZS operator, which are associated with purely real spectrum ofHill’s equation (i.e., the time-independent Schrodinger equation with periodiccoefficients) with a suitable complex potential.

 


Fri, Apr 8

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Sahana Hassan Balasubramanya, University of Münster
Actions of solvable groups on hyperbolic spaces
4:00PM, Zoom


Mon, Apr 11

Algebra Seminar
Xiuping Su, University of Bath
Kac's Theorem for a class of string algebras of affine type \(\mathbf {C}\).

4:00PM, Contact achirvas@buffalo.edu for zoom link


Tue, Apr 12

Applied Math Seminar
Dmitry Zakharov, Central Michigan U
Lump chains in the KP-I equation


4:00PM, Zoom - contact sergeydy@buffalo.edu for link


Thu, Apr 14

Colloquium
Peter Thomas (Case Western U)
Phase and phase-amplitude reduction for stochastic oscillators
4:00PM, 250 Math Bldg, also accessible via Zoom - contact badzioch@buffalo for link


Fri, Apr 15

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Daxun Wang, University at Buffalo
Boundary action of CAT(0) groups and their \(C^\ast\)-algebras.

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Tue, Apr 19

Applied Math Seminar
Bernard Deconinck, U of Washington
The water wave pressure problem

4:00PM, Zoom - contact sergeyd@buffalo.edu for link


Fri, Apr 22

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Matt Durham, UC Riverside/Cornell University
Local quasicubicality and sublinear Morse geodesics in mapping class groups and Teichmuller space

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Apr 25

Algebra Seminar
Daniel Sage, LSU
The Deligne–Simpson problem for connections on \(\mathbb{G}_m\) with a maximally ramified singularity 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building Room 250

 


Tue, Apr 26

Applied Math Seminar
Svetlana Roudenko, Florida International University
The gKdV world thru the NLS lens
4:00PM, Zoom, contact sergeyd@buffalo.edu for link


Thu, Apr 28

Colloquium
Juanita Pinzón Caicedo, University of Notre Dame
Four-manifolds and knot concordance

4:00PM, 250 Math Bldg. Also via Zoom - contact badzioch@buffalo.edu for link.


Fri, Apr 29

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Juanita Pinzon Caicedo, University of Notre Dame
Satellite Operations that are not homomorphisms.

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, May 2

Special Event
Nicolle González, UCLA
A skein theoretic \(A_{q,t}\) algebra 
4:00PM, Mathematics Building room 250

 


 


Fri, May 6

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Ciprian Manolescu, Stanford University
A knot Floer stable homotopy type
Knot Floer homology (introduced by Ozsváth–Szabó and Rasmussen) is an invariant whose definition is based on symplectic geometry, and whose applications have transformed knot theory over the last two decades. Starting from a grid diagram of a knot, I will explain how to construct a spectrum whose homology is knot Floer homology. Conjecturally, the homotopy type of the spectrum is an invariant of the knot. The construction does not use symplectic geometry, but rather builds on a combinatorial definition of knot Floer homology. We inductively define models for the moduli spaces of pseudo-holomorphic strips and disk bubbles, and patch them together into a framed flow category. The inductive step relies on the vanishing of an obstruction class that takes values in a complex of positive domains with partitions. (This is joint work with Sucharit Sarkar.)
4:00PM, Zoom


Mon, May 9

Algebra Seminar
Jie Ren, UB
Quivers and 2-Calabi-Yau categories
 
4:00PM

The framework of Calabi-Yau categories is appropriate forthe theory of motivic Donaldson-Thomas invariants. I will give an introductionto the Calabi-Yau categories associated to quivers, and the analyticity oftheir stability structures.

 


 


Mon, May 9

Special Event
Jie Ren, UB
Quivers and 2-Calabi-Yau categories
 
4:00PM

The framework of Calabi-Yau categories is appropriate forthe theory of motivic Donaldson-Thomas invariants. I will give an introductionto the Calabi-Yau categories associated to quivers, and the analyticity oftheir stability structures.

 


 


Tue, May 10

Applied Math Seminar
Panayotis Kevrekidis, U Mass
Some Vignettes of Nonlinear Waves in Granular Crystals: From Modeling and Analysis to Computations and Experiments
4:00PM, Zoom - contact sergeyd@buffalo.edu for link


Thu, May 26

Special Event
Tara Hudson
12:30PM


Tue, Aug 16

Special Event
103 Desk needs to be moved
12:30PM


Wed, Aug 31

Analysis Seminar
Yi Wang, Chongqing University
 Helton-Howe trace, Connes-Chern character and quantization

8:00PM, On Zoom - contact hfli@math.buffalo.edu for link


Tue, Sep 6

Applied Math Seminar
Maxim Bichuch, SUNY Buffalo
Introduction to Decentralized Finance

4:00PM, Math 250 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Wed, Sep 7

Analysis Seminar
Mariusz Tobolski, University of Wroclaw
The Stone-von Neumann theorem for locally compact quantum groups
4:00PM, On Zoom - contact hfli@mah.buffalo.edu for link


Fri, Sep 9

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Bill Menasco (UB)
Surface Embeddings in \(\mathbb{R}^2 \times \mathbb{R}\)
4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Sep 12

Algebra Seminar
Shichen Tang
Arithmetic stability of higher rank Artin-Schreier-Witt towers
4:00PM, 250 Mathematics Building


Wed, Sep 14

Analysis Seminar
Hanfeng Li, SUNY at Buffalo
Entropy and asymptotic pairs
4:00PM, 250 Math Building and on Zoom - contact hfli@buffalo.edu for Zoom link


Fri, Sep 16

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Yulan Qing (Fudan University/ University of Toronto)
Gromov boundary extended


4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Sep 19

Algebra Seminar
Mariusz Tobolski, University of Wrocław
4:00PM, 250 Mathematics Building


Tue, Sep 20

Applied Math Seminar
Yangwen Zhang, CMU
A new reduced order model of linear parabolic PDEs.

4:00PM, Math 250 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Tue, Sep 20

Special Event
250 Sexual Harassment Prevention Training
5:15PM, 250 Mathematics Building


Thu, Sep 22

Colloquium
Abdul Zalloum (University of Toronto)
 
4:00PM, 250 Mathematics Building


Fri, Sep 23

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Abdul Zalloum (University of Toronto)
Hyperbolic models for CAT(0) spaces

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Oct 3

Algebra Seminar
Li Li, Oakland University
Cluster algebras and Nakajima's graded quivervarieties 
4:00PM, 250 Mathematics Building

 

Nakajima's graded quiver varieties are complex algebraicvarieties associated with quivers. They are introduced by Nakajima in the studyof representations of universal enveloping algebras of Kac-Moody Lie algebras,and can be used to study cluster algebras. In the talk, I will explain how toprecisely locate the supports of the triangular basis of skew-symmetric rank-2quantum cluster algebras by applying the decomposition theorem to variousmorphisms related to quiver varieties, thus prove a conjecture proposed byLee-Li-Rupel-Zelevinsky in 2014.

 


Wed, Oct 5

Special Event
2022 Myhill lecture Series: Gigliola Staffilani October 5-7
The study of wave interactions: where beautiful mathematical ideas come together.


4:00PM, 250 Mathematics Building,


Tue, Oct 11

Applied Math Seminar
Zechuan Zhang, SUNY Buffalo
Soliton resolution and asymptotic stability of N-soliton solutions for the defocusing mKdV equation with finite density type initial data

4:00PM, Math 250 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Wed, Oct 12

Analysis Seminar
Yuqing (Frank) Lin, Texas A&M University
Entropy for actions of free groups under bounded orbit equivalence

4:00PM, 250 math Building and on Zoom - contact hfli@math.buffalo.edu for link


Fri, Oct 14

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Bojun Zhao (UB)
Left orderability and taut foliations with one-sided branching
4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Oct 17

Algebra Seminar
Mihai Fulger, U of Connecticut
Positivity vs. semi-stability for bundles with vanishing discriminant
4:00PM, Zoom - contact achirvas@buffalo.edu for link


Tue, Oct 18

Colloquium
Jie Shen, Purdue University
Efficient positivity/bound preserving schemes for complex nonlinear systems
4:00PM, Math Bldg Room 250


Fri, Oct 21

Geometry and Topology Seminar
José Román Aranda Cuevas (Binghamton University)

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Mon, Oct 24

Algebra Seminar
Doyon Kim, Rutgers University
The existence and uniqueness of Whittaker functionals for \(GL(n,R)\): an algebraic-geometric proof
4:00PM, Zoom; please email achirvas@buffalo.edu for meeting info


Tue, Oct 25

Applied Math Seminar
Naoki Masuda, SUNY Buffalo
Core-periphery structure in networks.

4:00PM, Math 250 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Mon, Oct 31

Special Event
Jesse Huang, University of Alberta
Some attempts to build NCCRs for higher dimensional toric Gorenstein rings 
4:00PM, Zoom; please email achirvas@buffalo.edu for meeting info

 

A noncommutative crepant resolution (NCCR) is a nice endomorphism algebra of a sum of modules that ``resolves'' a normal Gorenstein ring. In the toric context, mirror symmetry suggests that questions surrounding the existence of NCCRs and derived equivalences among them could have geometric answers. In this talk, I will discuss some speculations on a geometric method to construct NCCRs as a quiver algebra for certain toric Calabi-Yau singularities ,potentially generalizing results of Mozgovoy and Bocklandt in dimension 3.


Tue, Nov 1

Applied Math Seminar
Scott Rich, Krembil Brain Institute
Resilience through diversity: Reduced heterogeneity in human epilepsy destabilizes neuronal circuits and promotes seizure-like transitions.

4:00PM, Math 250 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Wed, Nov 9

Analysis Seminar
Hongming Nie, SUNY at Stony Brook
A metric on hyperbolic components

4:00PM, 250 Math Building and on Zoom - contact hfli@math.buffalo.edu for Zoom link


Tue, Nov 15

Applied Math Seminar
Anita Layton, Waterloo
TBA

4:00PM, Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Wed, Nov 16

Analysis Seminar
Sagun Chanillo, Rutgers University
Local Version of Courant's Nodal Domain Theorem
4:00PM, On Zoom - conact hfli@math.buffalo.edu for link


Thu, Nov 17

Colloquium
Colloquium Hossein Shahmohamad
Graphs & Their potent Energy Drinks 
4:00PM

Speaker: Hossein Shahmohamad, RIT

Title: Graphs & Their potent Energy Drinks

 


Fri, Nov 18

Geometry and Topology Seminar
Yvon Verberne (University of Toronto)
Postponed to Spring 2023 due to Storm
Automorphisms of the fine curve graph

4:00PM, 122 Mathematics Building


Wed, Nov 30

Analysis Seminar
Joseph Hundley, SUNY at Buffalo
Functorial Descent in the Exceptional Groups
4:00PM, Zoom - contact hfli@math.buffalo.edu for link


Tue, Dec 6

Applied Math Seminar
Weiqi Chu, UCLA
Non-Markovian opinion models inspired by random processes on networks

4:00PM, Math 250 and on Zoom - contact mbichuch@buffalo.edu for link


Sat, Dec 17

Special Event
150 KIm Javor
10:00AM


Mon, Dec 19

Special Event
Liviu Paunescu, Simion Stoilow Institute of Mathematics

4:00PM, : Zoom; please email achirvas@buffalo.edu for meeting info

 

Two permutations that almost commute are close to two commuting permutations. The same question can be asked for other relations, not only the commutant. Moreover, the answer to this question depends only on the group that the equations describe. We then survey some recent results where this question is answered affirmatively or negatively, depending on the group, and study the connections to the theory of sofic groups.

 

2022 SPOTLIGHT
INTERDISCIPLINARY EVENT
UB Biological Sciences Seminar Series
MARCH 3, 2022; 228 NSC and via Zoom
Dr. Naoki Masuda, UB Mathematics, Gene network analysis: Revealing adaptive structural variants and quantifying omnigenic models. 

2020 Event Highlights

  • Class of 2021
    6/3/21
    Four years. You’ve strived, sweated and succeeded. You’ve made friends and memories to last a lifetime. You’ve come so far. To recognize this achievement, the UB Department of Mathematics is pleased to present the name of each graduate in our Class of 2021.
  • Class of 2020
    5/14/21
    PRESENTING UB MATHEMATICS CLASS OF 2020.
    Four years. You’ve strived, sweated and succeeded. You’ve made friends and memories to last a lifetime. You’ve come so far. To recognize this achievement, we present the name of each graduate in the Class of 2020.

2019 Event Highlights

Class of 2019: Professor John Ringland was the faculty speaker at the College of Arts Commencement. Professor Ringland's 2019 Commencement Address is here.

  • Myhill Lecture Series 2019: Laura Demarco, Northwestern University
    9/14/22
    The Myhill Lecture Series 2019, "Complex dynamics and arithmetic geometry", will be delivered by Dr. Laura DeMarco, Henry S. Noyes Professor of Mathematics at Northwestern University. She earned her PhD in 2002 from Harvard. DeMarco's research is focused on the dynamics of polynomial or rational mappings on algebraic varieties, especially in dimension 1, with the primary goal of understanding notions of stability and bifurcation. Her recent work explores connections between dynamical properties of maps and the arithmetic geometry of the underlying varieties.

2018 Event Highlights

Events.

Dec 3
Algebra Seminar- S. Paul Smith, University of Washington

Elliptic algebras
4:00PM, Mon Dec 3 2018, 150 Mathematics Bldg.

The algebras of the title form a flat family of (non-commutative!)
deformations of polynomial rings. They depend on a relatively prime
pair of integers n>k>0, an elliptic curve E, and a translation
automorphism of E. Quite a lot is known when n=3 and n=4 (and k=1),
in which case the algebras are deformations of the polynomial ring on
3 and 4 variables. These were discovered and have been closely studied
by Artin, Schelter, Tate, and Van den Bergh, and Sklyanin. They were
defined in full generality by Feigin and Odesskii around 1990 and
apart from their work at that time they have been little studied.
Their representation theory appears to be governed by, and best
understood in terms of, the geometry of embeddings of powers of E (and
related varieties like symmetric powers of E) in projective
spaces. Theta functions in several variables and mysterious identities
involving them provide a powerful technical tool.

This is a report on joint work with Alex Chirvasitu and Ryo Kanda.

2018 Myhill Lecture Series

  • Mark Newman, 2018
    9/14/22
    Myhill Lecture Series 2018 by Dr. Mark Newman, Anatol Rapoport Distinguished University Professor of Physics, Department of Physics and Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan.