Graduate Courses

Browse our current semester course offerings.

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Fall 2019 Course Offerings

APY 501SEM: Teaching and Research Resources

Arranged
Dr. Joyce Sirianni

Pedagogical aspects of instruction, including use of films, laboratories and field experience, bibliographic and archival materials, cross-cultural files and data banks.

APY 508SEM: Qualitative Research Methods

Reg. #19861
Tuesday 3:30-6:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Ana Mariella Bacigalupo

This course will provide students with hands-on training in qualitative, ethnographic methods of research. Students will learn field techniques such as participant observation, interviewing, documentation, and use of media. Students will also learn how to design a research project, write a research proposal, and apply to the human subjects review board for project approval. The course will address research ethics, interpretation and representation of data, and the use of effective writing techniques. It will provide a critical evaluation of the nature of ethnographic research, including the rethinking of site, voice, and ethnographic authority. Students’ final projects can either be an ethnographic interview, an exercise in participant observation, or a research proposal in preparation for an MA or PhD project.

APY 515SEM: Intersubjectivity and Fieldwork

Reg. #23596
Thrusday 10:00am-12:40pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Meghana Joshi

This course brings theories of the intersubjective developed in modern clinical psychoanalysis to bear on interlocution-based ethnographic field research. It asks how key concepts such as object relations, transference and countertransference, and the intersubjective third might help us to understand how insight is produced in the relation of ethnographers to their interlocutors, and how the experience of fieldwork itself can lead to certain knowledge claims. We will concentrate here primarily on insights from the post-Freudian psychoanalytic schools.

APY 546SEM: Dental Anthropology

Reg. #22023
Tuesday 4:00-6:40pm
158 Spaulding Quad
Dr. Joyce Sirianni

Topic: Dental Anthropology - Interpreting oral health and behavior in past populations

APY 575SEM: Migration and Diaspora

Reg. #23597
Monday 4:00-6:40pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Deborah Reed-Danahay

This graduate seminar explores diaspora and migration in the contemporary world.  Most examples come from the experiences of diasporic populations living in North America, Central America, and Europe.  Topics include displacement and emplacement, belonging, migration and citizenship, and transnationalism.  In addition to conceptual and ethnographic approaches, we consider personal narratives of migration. Students have the opportunity to conduct research projects related to these topics.

APY 593SEM: War and Peace

Reg. #22021
Monday 9:30am-12:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Vasiliki Neofotistos

The seminar is woven around the concept of violence and explores key questions regarding the eruption of armed conflict and the maintenance of peace in state societies. Specifically, what are some of the social  processes that can lead to war? How does peace prevail in societies fraught with tension? What role do power and class inequalities play in the outbreak of violence and the maintenance of peace? Emphasis will be placed on the role of ethnic and national identities both in the escalation and in the management of armed conflict.

APY 600TUT: MA/Thesis Guidance

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

Graduate students should register for their major professor’s section of this course when they are writing their MA Project/Thesis.

APY 601TUT: Individual Readings in Archaeology

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

If, after speaking to the Instructor and he/she agrees to work with you, the graduate student must fill out an Independent Study Form (form available outside the Anthropology Graduate Office), have the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies sign it then give it to Maria to put in your file which becomes part of your Application to Candidacy. Then the student may register for the appropriate number of credit hours.

APY 602TUT: Individual Readings in Cultural Anthropology

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

If, after speaking to the Instructor and he/she agrees to work with you, the graduate student must fill out an Independent Study Form (form available outside the Anthropology Graduate Office), have the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies sign it then give it to Maria to put in your file which becomes part of your Application to Candidacy. Then the student may register for the appropriate number of credit hours.

APY 607TUT: Individual Readings in Physical Anthropology

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

If, after speaking to the Instructor and he/she agrees to work with you, the graduate student must fill out an Independent Study Form (form available outside the Anthropology Graduate Office), have the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies sign it then give it to Maria to put in your file which becomes part of your Application to Candidacy. Then the student may register for the appropriate number of credit hours.

APY 614LEC: Hominin Behavior

Reg. #19024
Wednesday 3:30-6:10pm
158 Spaulding Quad
Dr. Stephen Lycett

There can be few greater challenges to science than studying the behavior of a long-dead animal. This is especially the case with studying hominin behavior. Yet, this challenge must be met if we are to understand our behavioral origins and heritage. Today, only one species of hominin exists: Homo sapiens. An absence of closely related hominin taxa leaves us with a limited range of potential models that we might look to for inspiration. For instance, do chimpanzees provide clues or should we look to modern hunter-gatherers? Does psychology provide an answer? Do we need to look to evolutionary theory? Can experiments be of assistance in a fundamentally historical sciences? With stone tools and the debris of their manufacture comprising much of our basic primary data, what hope is there for a rigorous science of hominin behavior?

This class is divided into two sections. The first section will provide an introduction to hominin evolution and the behavioral record, which will be useful to those new to the topic. Along the way some of the major questions will be encountered. The aim of the first section is to show something of what is at stake in terms of the importance of these issues for a full understanding of own behavioral heritage; and yet, something of the frustration that accompanies this field will also be demonstrated. The second part of the class attempts to challenge students to arrive at conclusions about how a scientific response to these questions and frustrations may be developed. A series of possible responses are introduced, and you will be challenged to probe the strengths and weaknesses of these various approaches. By the end of the course you will be asked to present your views (with justifications) for how a rigorous and scientific approach to our behavioral evolution may be undertaken.

APY 650SEM: Professional Writing

Reg. #23599
Wednesday 9:30am-12:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Timothy Chevral

This course is intended to provide you with an introduction to basic professionalization necessary for a career in academic or research archaeology. A certain amount of skills are necessary to get through graduate school, even if you intend to pursue a non-­academic career track. Most importantly, the course should also provide a means for you to begin to resolve your own research interests and to consider what basic research strategies you should invoke in your work. Topics include writing that describes your academic persona: autobiographical sketches, CVs, and statements of purpose; critique and review of other people's work: book reviews, proposal reviews, and manuscript reviews; disciplinary service: biographies, obituaries, organizing sessions and panels; shaping and presenting your original research: research and grant proposals, book proposals, conference presentations.

The format will involve lecture, discussions and presentations. Substantial portions of the classroom hours are intended for group discussion of various topics and for student reports and peer evaluations.

APY 651SEM: Graduate Survey in Physical Anthropology

Reg. #18677
Monday 12:30-3:10pm
158 Spaulding Quad
Dr. Noreen von Cramon-Taubadel

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. Here we will review topics such as evolutionary theory, basic genetics, the evolution of the primates, human evolution, modern human diversity, the evolution of cognition and language, human social behavior, and the impacts of health and disease.

APY 652LEC: Graduate Survey in Archaeology

Reg. #14822
Tuesday 9:30am-12:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Timothy Chevral

The four ‘important questions’ usually addressed in anthropological archaeology deal with modern human origins and development, or ‘what makes us human’, the transition from small scale foraging, collecting, and hunting societies to agricultural societies, then the eventual emergence and the institutionalization of more structurally complicated societies, and finally, the beginning and development of ‘civilization’. These notions are important – and what do they even mean – but often largely consider economy and political organization as if they are the only factors that determine the human condition. There are other complimentary issues to think about as well: the human relationship with the physical world of nature, places, and ‘things’, the supernatural and ideological world, the interpersonal and intergroup relationships of people to each other, near and distant, and the kind of social and natural forces that drive stasis or change through time.

This means that we will examine the development of unique ways of life in select parts of the Old World, think about them comparatively, and at the same time fit them into some basic current conceptual and theoretical discussions within archaeology, as a preview to the more intensive theoretical review that will come in your second semester, as well as the more specialized courses in specific areas, time periods, and topics.

APY 655SEM: Graduate Survey of Social Anthropology

Reg. #19182
Tuesday 12:30-3:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Jaume Franquesa

This course is designed to give first year graduate students a basic grounding in "classic" social theory as it was developed in that important modernist period between the mid-19th century and the end of the first World War, along with the subsequent development and refinement of social theory through this modernist lens, and the break with modernism in the late 1970's. Throughout, our emphasis will be on the ways in which social theoretical issues informing contemporary anthropology may be illuminated by foundational work in classic social theory, or where contemporary theoretical problems represent a more radical split with "classic" discourses.

APY 700TUT: Dissertation Guidance

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

Graduate students should register for at least 1 credit hour of their major professor’s section of this every semester until the dissertation is complete when writing their PhD dissertation.

APY 730SEM: Adv Prob in Areal Archaeology - Prehistory of Europe

Reg. #15325
Wednesday 2:00-4:40pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Sarunas Milisauskas

Course covers the prehistory of Europe from the Paleolithic to the Iron Age.