Graduate Courses

Browse our current semester course offerings.

On this page:

Spring 2019 Course Offerings

APY 501SEM: Teaching and Research Resources

Arranged
Dr. Joyce Sirianni

Pedagogical aspects of instruction, including use of films, laboratories and field experience, bibliographic and archival materials, cross-cultural files and data banks.

APY 514SEM: Museum Management

Reg. #20385
Monday 9:30am-12:10pm
Anderson Gallery
Dr. Peter Biehl

Museum and collection management and research are motivated by two things: a love of objects, and a fascination with the ways in which they speak about the past and the present. The care of artifacts cannot stop at identification, physical conservation, and exhibition. Research about museum and collection objects must be seen as part of a larger task: an exploration of the social and cultural significance of objects in relation to each other and to the people who made, used, and kept them as well as those who collected them. Conservation must include preservation of the information accompanying an object, information beyond provenance, or object type. Finally, curatorial research entails a critical awareness of our own culturally-bound responses to artifacts.

This course prepares students for research in the museum environment, and for the challenge of developing meaning and value for those collections, in the context of the Cravens Collection, housed since 2010 in the Anderson Gallery of the UB College of Arts and Sciences, where the course will be held. Each class integrates presentations, group work and discussion, case studies, and independent research. In addition, the instructor will facilitate visits from guest lecturers. At the end of the course, the students will curate together their own public exhibition of objects from the Cravens Collection, and will write up short narratives about the objects they have studied during the course. The narratives will then be included in an exhibition catalogue.

APY 515SEM: Politics of Indigeneity

Reg. #23275
Tuesday 3:30-6:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Ana Mariella Bacigalupo

While indigeneity is often treated as an instrument of political representation and legal appeal, this course explores the historical and relational underpinnings from which so-called ethnic movements draw. Building from ethnographic and historical texts, the course begins with a careful examination of how embodied orientations to place have given way to distinct articulations of political belonging, particularly in the region of South America. We then consider how these place-based modes of collectivity have been shaped by various events including colonial land dispossession, republican projects of national integration and citizenship, labor movements and new extractive economies, multicultural reforms, and anti-imperialist projects of ethnic revivalism. In the final part of the course, we track the unexpected ways that these older orientations to place and collectivity are creatively redeployed within newer struggles for indigenous and environmental justice. By exploring the ways that specific histories of attachment shape contemporary demands for rights and political belonging, the course aims to foster new ways of approaching indigeneity in the social sciences and humanities.

APY 540LEC: History of Archaeology

Reg. #19022
Wednesday 2:00-4:40pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Sarunas Milisauskas

This course is a general survey of the history of archaeology from the Renaissance to the present.  We will focus on the major scholars in the history of archaeology. The relationship of archaeology with political, social and religious issues will be discussed. 

APY 546SEM: Topics - Morphometrics

Reg. #23582
Friday 10:00am-12:40pm
158 Spaulding Quad
Dr. Noreen von Cramon-Taubadel

Morphometrics is the quantitative analysis of shape and size variation, and is a relatively widely used set of techniques in anthropology and archaeology. During this course you will learn about the history of morphometrics, which is rooted in biology, engineering, and, to a large part, anthropology. You will learn the basics of the geometry underlying morphometrics, as well as the software programs available to conduct morphometric analyses in 2- and 3-dimensions. The course will comprise a mixture of formal lectures, discussions around particular readings, and hands-on practical assignments.

APY 554SEM: Topics - Anthropology of the Body

Reg. #23313
Friday 12:00-2:40pm
354 Fillmore Academic Center
Dr. Meghana Joshi

Since the 1980s, the body has come to be understood as simultaneously subject and object, meaningful and material, individual and social and has served as the basis of a stunningly large number of inquiries in the discipline. It continues to be a fertile site from which anthropologists mount refutations of abstract, universalizing models and ideologies and interrogate operations of power and possibilities for agency and political change both theoretically and in specific ethnographic contexts. This course reflects this history of inquiry and discusses current approaches, insights, and conceptualizations of the body in anthropology and related fields, illuminating the newer arenas in which it is being investigated, specifically the paradigmatic shift toward questions of embodiment and interest in the senses, emotion, and affect as essential to lived experience.

APY 572: Topics in Archaeology

Students may enroll in both sections during the Spring 2019 semester.

Section 1: Complex Societies

Reg. #23119
Wednesday 9:30am-12:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Timothy Chevral

We will first define the meaning of the term “cultural complexity” and study it’s origins – in order to rule over others, a prospective leader first must convince his or her basically egalitarian peers to yield substantial power to an individual or small group. How and under what circumstances can this happen? We will next look at prestate societies commonly called chiefdoms, then the origins of “primary” or “pristine” states – those that arose from landscapes where no other states had ever existed. Some see this form of organization and way of life as an aberration that has cursed human existence since its origins. What do various archaeologists have to say about this? We will also study the collapse of such societies – a topic of considerable interest on its own, especially, perhaps, in light of the collapse of several empires and states in the last quarter century. Finally, we will examine the development of “secondary” states, which arise in connection with already extant states, and the ideas archaeologists have proposed to explain their internal development and their relationships to other, more mature neighboring polities.

Section 2: Critical Archaeology in the Digital Age

Reg. #19194
Monday 3:30-6:10pm
354 Fillmore Academic Center
Dr. Kevin Garstki

As archaeology becomes a discipline intimately tied to digital technologies, archaeologists must be well equipped to use and assess these technologies in archaeological contexts. This course will provide students with an introduction to the innovative uses of digital technologies in archaeology for recording, visualization, analysis, publication, and preservation. We will focus on the dialogues that have challenged the widespread use of these technologies and engage with how these technologies are changing the way archaeology is practiced. The course is a seminar format – significant discussion and student participation will be required, with some lecture to introduce certain digital methods. In addition to participation, students will be responsible for leading discussions, reports on case studies, and a final research design in the format of a grant proposal.  

APY 573LEC: Primate Evolutionary Biology

Reg. #23088
Arranged*
Dr. Joyce Sirianni

Primate specialization and taxonomy, fossil history, anatomy and behavior in the primate order, odontology and human origins.  Lecture course with some laboratory work.

*Students enrolled in this section are required to attend the Monday lecture in 170 Fillmore from 4:00-6:40pm and attend meetings for 1 laboratory section.

APY 575SEM: Topics - Living in the Anthropocene

Reg. #23081
Thursday 3:30-6:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Ana Mariella Bacigalupo

This interdisciplinary course engages with debates about the Anthropocene the idea that humans have irrevocably (and negatively) altered the earth in the current epoch and debates about the future of (various) humans, their relationships to other species, and planetary transformation. How does anthropogenic climate change affect other living beings, including humans? How do we think about anthropos, or the human, in such times? When did the Anthropocene begin, and which humans brought it into being? How are differently situated humans being changed by the rapid environmental changes under way? How are our notions of the human intertwined with those about other forms of life? What kind of worlds are being made and unmade, and for what beings? In exploring these and other questions, we will analyze works by anthropologists, geographers, philosophers, lawyers, feminists, STS thinkers, economists, sociologists, chemists, geologists, and other scientists.

APY 587SEM: Topic - North American Archaeology

Reg. #21540
Tuesday 9:30am-12:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Ezra Zubrow

Archaeology Students: This course meets the New World requirement.

Using current and classic texts and articles we will discuss the various issues in temporal and geographic periods of North American Archaeology which are if not unique then have been endemic in the practice of North American Archaeology from its beginnings to the present. The course will cover the span of prehistory and history of the North American continent up into the period of contact with Europeans. This will include the people of the Americas, the Paleoindian period, the Archaic Period, and the Woodland Period including interactions of Woodland Cultures with Europeans.

APY 600TUT: MA/Thesis Guidance

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

Graduate students should register for their major professor’s section of this course when they are writing their MA Project/Thesis.

APY 601TUT: Individual Readings in Archaeology

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

If, after speaking to the Instructor and he/she agrees to work with you, the graduate student must fill out an Independent Study Form (form available outside the Anthropology Graduate Office), have the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies sign it then give it to Maria to put in your file which becomes part of your Application to Candidacy. Then the student may register for the appropriate number of credit hours.

APY 602TUT: Individual Readings in Cultural Anthropology

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

If, after speaking to the Instructor and he/she agrees to work with you, the graduate student must fill out an Independent Study Form (form available outside the Anthropology Graduate Office), have the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies sign it then give it to Maria to put in your file which becomes part of your Application to Candidacy. Then the student may register for the appropriate number of credit hours.

APY 607TUT: Individual Readings in Physical Anthropology

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

If, after speaking to the Instructor and he/she agrees to work with you, the graduate student must fill out an Independent Study Form (form available outside the Anthropology Graduate Office), have the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies sign it then give it to Maria to put in your file which becomes part of your Application to Candidacy. Then the student may register for the appropriate number of credit hours.

APY 610SEM: Method and Theory in Archaeology

Reg. #19024
Tuesday 12:30-3:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Timothy Chevral

This seminar introduces archaeology graduate students to the critical theoretical and methodological issues that are central to Anglo-Americanist archaeology. Using a numerous primary sources, we will study the historical development of the field, highlighting significant changes in the direction and nature of archaeological research from the formation of the culture history paradigm in the early 20th century, through the processual perspective of the past 35 years, to the post processual approach that has emerged since the 1980s.

We will examine how theory and method together explain cultural transformations such as the origins of agriculture, the development of social complexity, the rise and fall of states, and other important issues in archaeology, and how explanations are derived through specific approaches including neo-evolutionism, materialism, historicism, functionalism, cultural ecology, behavioral archaeology, practice theory, agency theory, queer theory, gender theory, interaction theory, hermaneutics, interpretive archaeology, cognitive approaches, Neo-Darwinianism, and archaeology as social action.

APY 654SEM: Graduate Survey of Social Anthropology

Reg. #19025
Thursday 12:30-3:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center
Dr. Frederick Klaits

This seminar will introduce you to current theoretical issues within social and cultural anthropology.  After gaining some historical perspectives on our discipline during the past 25-30 years, we will take stock of socio-cultural anthropology in the early 21st century. We will read theoretical and ethnographic work drawing from a variety of subfields and geographic regions.

APY 700TUT: Dissertation Guidance

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

Graduate students should register for at least 1 credit hour of their major professor’s section of this every semester until the dissertation is complete when writing their PhD dissertation.