NeMLA Graduate Fellows

The NeMLA Graduate Fellows Program is operated through the Department of English at NeMLA's administrative host, the University at Buffalo. This program provides graduate students a unique opportunity to get practical experience in the working of a large academic convention and non-profit organization, as well as to establish professional connections with scholars across the Northeast and to gain insight into one of the most important forms of knowledge production and dissemination in the humanities.

2019-2020 Graduate Assistant

Ashley Byczkowski.

Ashley Byczkowski is a French Literature PhD student in the Department of Romance Languages & Literatures at the University at Buffalo. Her research interests include 19th and 20th century French and Franco-Caribbean women writers, psychoanalysis and the mother-daughter dyad, autobiographical novels, and global feminisms.

2019-2020 Fellows

Award Fellows

Jiwon Ohm.

Jiwon Ohm is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at the University at Buffalo. Her research focuses on the imagining and forming of national identities in/through 20th- to 21st-century (medieval) fantasy literature.

Nicole Sedor.

Nicole Sedor is a PhD candidate in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at the University at Buffalo where she teaches undergraduate Spanish courses as a teaching assistant. Her concentration is in Spanish linguistics with her research interests focusing on applied linguistics including second language acquisition. She is currently working on her dissertation, which investigates the Integrated Performance Assessment framework in university Spanish classrooms. She is also the president of the Romance Languages and Literatures Graduate Student Association.

Convention Fellows

Shayna Israel image.

Callie Ingram is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at University at Buffalo. Her research interests focus on issues of ethics, epistemology, and narrative in contemporary American literature. Her article "Counter-Narrative Ethics: Don DeLillo's Post-9/11 Novels" is forthcoming in Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction.

Patrick Clancy.

Patrick Clancy is a NeMLA Convention Fellow and an Ancient History MA student in the Department of Classics at the University at Buffalo. His research interests include Archaic Athenian democracy, Archaic/Classical Spartan foreign policy, and Late Republic/Early Imperial Roman wine production. He is currently researching Spartan foreign policy changes during 510-504 BCE for his thesis. Patrick also works as a Graduate Assistant for both the College of Arts and Sciences and the Center for Diversity Innovation.

Events, Editor, and Social Media Fellows

Amy Greer, NeMLA Events Fellow.

Cassandra Scherr is a Ph.D. student in the Department of English at Buffalo. Her research interests focus on the use of speculative fiction when exploring questions of race, ethnicity, gender, and class in fiction, art, and activism.

Dana Venerable.

Dana Venerable is a PhD student in the Department of English at the University at Buffalo. Her research includes analyzing notation practices, their standards and systems, with focuses in dance, ethnicity and race, journalism, performance, poetics, sound, and 20th- to 21st-century literature. She is interested in how communities in power choreograph and/or manipulate marginalized people through methods of recording bodies, physical movement and thought, in addition to ways in which the marginalized resist, defining their identity, land/space, language, senses of home, and voice. Dana has written for The Journal of American Drama and Theatre (JADT), VIDA Review, and Zoomoozophone Review.

Promotions, Exhibits, and Professional Development Coordinator

Claire Sommers.

Claire Sommers is a Post-Doctoral Fellow of Early Modern British Literature in the English department at Washington University in St. Louis. She recently completed her PhD in Comparative Literature, specializing in Classical and English Renaissance literatures. Her dissertation Chimeras, Centaurs, and Satyrs: Creating Mixed Genre Texts in Antiquity and the Renaissance argues that authors would use mythological figures such as the Chimera or the satyr to symbolize the composite nature of their works, and to demonstrate that hybridity is the means of transcending existing forms of expression. Her article on the role of the shadows in Plato’s cave was recently published in Arion. Claire is the Creator and Founding Director of the Critical Theory Certificate at CUNY and has taught at Fordham, Hunter and Baruch. Claire serves as the Promotions, Exhibits, and Professional Development Coordinator at NeMLA, where she oversees several convention initiatives including the Job Cinic, the Book Exhibit, and the Undergraduate Research Forum.