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Research & Evaluation

IPCC Seed Funding Awards—Spring 2015

The Institute for Person-Centered Care (IPCC) awarded a total of $41,480 in seed funding to five UB Faculty for projects to support research activities relating to aging and person-centered care for the University at Buffalo.  Funding for these awards is supported by the IPCC and The Office of the Vice President for Research and Economic Development.

Click Here to read the Call for Proposals

Funded Projects

8/6/15

Current physical rehabilitation of stroke patients is primarily hospital centric and is directed towards Activities of Daily Living (ADL’s). However, due to economic pressures on the U.S. health care system, patients are receiving less therapy and going home without regaining the whole functionality of their body.

5/31/15

Current physical rehabilitation of stroke patients is primarily hospital centric and is directed towards Activities of Daily Living (ADL’s). However, due to economic pressures on the U.S. health care system, patients are receiving less therapy and going home without regaining the whole functionality of their body.

5/31/15

Project Summary: The justice-involved population is a vulnerable group with complex physical and behavioral health conditions. Many of these individuals cannot address their health care needs, and do not know how to access social services. A person-centered approach is needed to help them manage their health, welfare, and become self-sufficient.

5/31/15

Project Summary: “Comfort Measures Only” (CMO) is a medical order which is sometimes applied to guide the care of a seriously ill hospitalized patient. Though commonly used in clinical practice, and ostensibly based in shared understanding, both the limited available literature and our preliminary findings indicate that the label of CMO has unclear and inconsistent meanings across settings and providers.

5/31/15

Project Summary: Elderly individuals suffering from age-related cognitive or physical decline are prone to depression, sleep disturbances, and chronic stress, which can decrease their quality of life. This project will examine whether continuous measurements of physiological correlates of daily living can help elders and their caregivers to better identify and understand recurrent patterns that contribute to such negative outcomes.

5/31/15

Project Summary: We propose to investigate critical features in developing an “extended care-network”. The envisioned network is based upon extension of current research in the area of cyber-empathic design to the area of healthcare prognostics. Specifically, we propose to use a sensor-integrated shoe platform in conjunction with mobility tests for screening a population at-risk of falling.