June 3 & 4, 2021

Global Glyphosate: New Challenges in Regulating Pervasive Chemicals in the Anthropocene

June 3 & 4, 2021: Global Glyphosate: New Challenges in Regulating Pervasive Chemicals in the Anthropocene. Synthetic pesticides are deeply woven into our landscapes and bodies, transforming ecologies and biologies in ways that we are only beginning to understand. Glyphosate, the world’s most widely used herbicide, offers a window into the problematic of pervasive chemical compounds as agents in the Anthropocene, the geologic epoch in which humans have permanently changed the planet. Scholars will offer comparative, interdisciplinary, conceptually-related engagements with glyphosate in order to grasp and deepen the Anthropocene perspective and, by extension, to consider the ecological, economic and regulatory implications of the chemicalization of life. Space is limited. Workshop registration is required.

Thursday & Friday, June 3 & 4, 2021

Schedule forthcoming. 

Workshop Registration

The workshop is free and open to the public. Space is limited. Advance registration is required, here.

Workshop Organizers

Marion Werner, Associate Professor, UB Department of Geography
Contact: wernerm@buffalo.edu

Christian Berndt, Professor, Department of Geography, University of Zurich

Becky Mansfield, Professor, Department of Geography, Ohio State University

Photo: Herbicide stock at a corner agrochemical shop in the Dominican Republic. Generic glyphosate has flooded low- and middle-income countries, where use has expanded and concentrations have increased. Photo courtesy of Marion Werner, 2019.

Photo: Herbicide stock at a corner agrochemical shop in the Dominican Republic. Generic glyphosate has flooded low- and middle-income countries, where use has expanded and concentrations have increased. Photo courtesy of Marion Werner, 2019.

On this page:

Workshop Sponsors

  • The Baldy Center for Law & Social Policy
  • UB Department of Geography 
  • The Gnamm Faculty Research Fund
  • UB Confucius Institute
  • UB Community for Global Health Equity

Participant Papers

Participant papers are available by logging into secure folder hosted by UBBox (access forthcoming)

PARTICIPANTS

Aniket Aga

Aniket Aga.

Aniket Aga

Aniket Aga, Fellow, Assistant Professor, Ashoka University, Sonipat, India. Dr. Aga is an anthropologist interested in environmental justice and sustainable agriculture. He examines the ongoing controversy over genetically-modified crops and the social relations of the petty pesticide trade in southern India.

Fernando Rafael Barri

Fernando Rafael Barri.

Fernando Rafael Barri

Fernando Rafael Barri, Professor, Center for Ecology and Renewable Natural Resources, National University of Córdoba, Argentina. Dr. Barri is a conservation biologist and ecologist. He analyzes the environmental effects of economic development processes in Argentina’s principal frontier agricultural region. 

Christian Berndt

Christian Berndt.

Christian Berndt

Christian Berndt, Professor, Department of Geography, University of Zurich. Dr. Berndt engages with the geographies of marketization and global commodity chains. He has investigated Argentina’s soy production complex with a focus on the role of biotechnology and herbicides as important drivers of the soy boom. 

Soledad Castro

ICTA.

Soledad Castro, PhD Student, Environmental Science and Technology Institute (ICTA), Autonomous University of Barcelona. Castro is a tropical ecotoxicologist from Costa Rica. Her doctoral research examines the changing regulation of pesticide trade and use in export agriculture in Costa Rica, with a focus on water and conservation.

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman.

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman, Senior Scientist, Pesticide Action Network North America. Dr. Ishii-Eiteman directs PANNA’s Grassroots Science Program and leads PAN campaigns to strengthen agroecology movements and policies globally and in the US, while countering corporate power and influence in agriculture, with a focus on the biotech/pesticide industry and genetically engineered herbicide-resistant seeds.

Ryan Galt

Ryan Galt.

Ryan Galt

Ryan Galt, Associate Professor, Department of Human Ecology, University of California at Davis.  Dr. Galt examines the challenges of pesticide regulation at multiple scales, including global-scale conventions and pesticide use in south-to-north fresh fruit and vegetable commodity chains.

Becky Mansfield

Becky Mansfield.

Becky Mansfield

Becky Mansfield, Professor, Department of Geography, Ohio State University. Dr. Mansfield writes on nature-society geography, with a focus on chemical geographies, the politics of toxicity, and the production of knowledge and regulatory science in the Anthropocene.

Adam Romero

Adam Romero.

Adam Romero

Adam Romero, Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington-Bothell. Dr. Romero studies the political economic origins of agricultural chemicals, with a focus on the transformation of the US agrichemical industry into a key consumer of industrial waste byproducts.

Annie Shattuck

Annie Shattuck.

Annie Shattuck

Annie Shattuck, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Indiana University--Bloomington. Dr. Shattuck studies the pesticide boom in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Laos. She is an expert in food sovereignty, agroecological movements, and alternative food movements. Prior to completing her PhD, she worked for Food First.

Anne Tittor

Anne Tittor.

Anne Tittor

Anne Tittor, Post-doctoral Researcher, Bioeconomy and Social Inequalities Research Group, Institute of Sociology, University of Jena, Germany. Dr. Tittor examines the socio-environmental effects of biofuel production in Argentina. Her current research is on social conflicts around pesticide use from an environmental justice perspective.

Marion Werner

Marion Werner.

Marion Werner

Marion Werner, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University at Buffalo, SUNY. Dr. Werner examines the effects of international trade agreements and global value chain relations on workers and farmers. Her current research project examines the development of generic pesticide markets in relation to agrarian transformations in the Caribbean.

Brian Williams

Brian Williams.

Brian Williams

Brian Williams, Assistant Professor, Department of Geosciences, Mississippi State University. Dr. Williams examines how race and nature shape pesticide usage, the continuities between plantation agriculture and contemporary industrial agriculture, and the implications for contemporary agro-environmental justice in the US.

Li Zhang

Li Zhang.

Li Zhang

Li Zhang, Assistant Professor, University of California-Irvine. Dr. Zhang’s research focuses on pesticide regulation in agro-food production in China based on ethnographic research with local officials, food merchants, peasants and other stakeholders in Guangxi and Henan provinces.