SDG 5: Gender Equality

SDG 5.

Empowering women and achieve gender equality

Women and girls have yet to achieve true equality throughout the world, yet their roles both at home and in the workplace are invaluable. The planet cannot be sustainable if people from all genders are not treated with respect, dignity and compensated equally for all of their work.

Take a Deep Dive on SDG 5

Check out the resources collected below that lifts up the importance of gender equality from faculty, staff and guest lectures here at UB.

Anastasia Curwood, "Black Feminist Power: Shirley Chisholm and National Politics, 1968-1982”

As part of the Gender Institute's Legacies of Suffrage Symposium, Dr. Anastasia Curwood delivers a lecture on the importance of Shirley Chisholm to American politics and women's political futures. She is an Associate Professor of African American and Africana Studies, Center for Equality and Social Justice, History, and Social Theory as well as the Director of African American & Africana Studies at the University of Kentucky. Her forthcoming book, Chisholm: The Life of an American Symbol, provides a detailed look at the life of African American icon Shirley Chisholm, the first woman to seek the presidential nomination of a major party.  (UB Gender Institute 4/30/20)

Trends, Learning Curves, and Lessons in STEM Equity: What Do the Last 20 Years of Research and Engagement Tell the Academy About Our 2050 Goals and Outcomes

Dr Tonya Matthews, Associate Provost for Inclusive Workforce Development and Director of the STEM Learning Innovation Center at Wayne State University (WSU) delivers the University at Buffalo Women in STEM Cooperative (WiSC) Annual Summit keynote address, "Trends, Learning Curves, and Lessons in STEM Equity: What Do the Last 20 Years of Research and Engagement Tell the Academy About Our 2050 Goals and Outcomes?" (UB Gender Institute 10/15/20)

Agency Through Thick and Thin: How Girls Exercise Sexual Agency Amid Social Injustice

In this talk, entitled "Agency Through Thick and Thin: How Girls Exercise Sexual Agency Amid Social Injustice," Professor Laina Bay-Cheng offers a critical analysis of how common conceptions and depictions of “sexual agency” simultaneously overestimate the power of agency and underestimate the ways in which it is exercised and by whom. Drawing on a current study, Professor Bay-Cheng spotlights how Martha Nussbaum’s Capabilities Approach offers a different orientation to girls’ sexualities and to systems’ obligations.(UB Gender Institute 11/23/20)

Electric Lights, Tourist Sights: Gendering Dispossession and Settler Colonial Infrastructure at Niagara Falls

In this lecture, “Electric Lights, Tourist Sights: Gendering Dispossession and Settler Colonial Infrastructure at Niagara Falls,” UB Distinguished Visiting Scholar Dr. Mishuana Goeman (Tonawanda Band of Seneca) discusses the connection between gender and Indigenous dispossession at Niagara Falls through the tourism and hydroelectric dam industries. (UB Gender Institute 12/7/20)

Legacies of Suffrage: Women's Activism Then and Now Opening Remarks by Director Carrie Bramen

Gender Institute Director Carrie Bramen offers welcoming remarks, an outline of the symposium, and an acknowledgement of the Seneca Land on which the event took place and the University at Buffalo operates. Bramen contextualizes the meaning of "Legacy" and how our symposium troubles the linear and monolithic view of progress for women's political rights. (UB Gender Institute 4/30/20)

4th Annual UB Women in STEM Summit: Keynote Interview

The Women in STEM Cooperative and UB Sustainability co-hosted UB's 4th Annual Women in STEM Cooperative Summit titled Sustainable Solutions and Champions of Change. This summit was on April 18th, 2018. The keynote interview below is between Hadar Borden, Blackstone LaunchPad at UB, Ali McPherson, Niagara Share, Samina Raja, PhD, Principal Investigator of the Food Systems Planning and Healthy Communities Lab in the UB Department of Urban and Regional Planning. The discussion is moderated by Liesl Folks, PhD, MBA, Dean, UB School of Engineering & Applied Sciences.

Social Workers for Reproductive Justice

Reproductive justice is a framework grounded in international human rights that seeks to increase social, political, and economic power and resources so that people can make healthy decisions about gender, sexuality, and families for themselves and their communities. In this episode, Katherine Bisanz, co-founder of Social Workers for Reproductive Justice, describes the organization's mission and the role of social work in this movement. (UB School of Social Work 8/8/15)

Gender Matters Podcast

Listen to all of UB's Gender Institute Podcast episodes below.

Gender Equality in the News

Sustainable Courses