June 9 and 10, 2022 — Hybrid Workshop

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

LPE Workshop, June 9 & 10, 2022:  Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference. The multiple crises of the 21st century — covid, climate, financial instability, inequality, and rising authoritarianism – have spurred a new intellectual movement, Law and Political Economy (LPE). More than a set of policy preferences, LPE aims to re-frame basic assumptions, ideals, and methods of analysis to guide a better way forward for law, state, and economy. This workshop will bring together LPE scholars to flesh out how this emerging framework offers a new and different understanding of current problems and possibilities. LPE both consolidates decades of social justice-oriented legal theory and develops it further to address new challenges. The workshop is co-sponsored by the Association for the Promotion of Political Economy and the Law, APPEAL, and organized by Martha T. McCluskey, in collaboration with APPEAL.

PARTICIPANT BIOS

New directions for thought and action

LPE is gaining recognition as an approach concerned with inequality, democracy, and the role of economic power. We will go beyond this general understanding to clarify how LPE addresses these themes differently than established traditions. LPE engages law with an economics not bound to the neoclassical orthodoxy, drawing on existing varied traditions of “political economy” and taking these further to highlight the centrality of law to economic power. We will further explore how this political economy perspective puts legal theory and legal institutions in a different light, suggesting new directions for thought and action.

LPE Workshop participants will discuss:

  • How would a Law and Political Economy framework apply to a specific legal or economic issue?
  • How does LPE change common understandings of contemporary problems and solutions?
  • What common ideas and methods identify LPE as an approach useful across a range of topics? 
  • What debates does LPE open up or close down? 
  • What criticisms, debates, and diverging views should LPE address? 
  • What further research topics and questions would advance LPE work?  
  • How can LPE’s scholarly insights be better translated into public policy, legal doctrine, and grassroots activism? 

LPE Workshop Sponsors

  • The Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy, University at Buffalo.
  • The Association for the Promotion of Political Economy and Law (APPEAL).

LPE Workshop Contact

The workshop has reached capacity. Thank you for your interest in our event. For further information about the workshop, please contact the Law Political Economy Conference, law-baldy-lpe@buffalo.edu

LPE WORKSHOP ORGANIZER

Martha T. McCluskey

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Martha McCluskey

The organizer of the LPE Workshop is Martha T. McCluskey, Professor Emerita, School of Law, University at Buffalo. Her teaching has included courses on constitutional law, torts, insurance, regulation, economic inequality and the relationships between work and family. McCluskey's scholarship draws on critical legal theories, including feminist theory and vulnerability theory, to re-think economic analysis of law. McCluskey is President of APPEAL, Board member of ClassCrits, and a member scholar of the Center for Progressive Reform.

LPE WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS

Maha Rafi Atal

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Maha Rafi Atal

Maha Rafi Atal is a Lecturer in Global Economy (Politics) at the School of Social & Political Sciences, Univeristy of Glasgow. She takes a political economy approach to the study of corporate power. Her current book project examines “corporate social responsibility” as a system of Company Rule, tracing its history from colonial trading corporations to contemporary multinationals. She is interested in corporate accountability under international law.

Sebastian Berger

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Sebastian Berger

Sebastian Berger,  Senior Lecturer of Economics, University of the West of England, conducts research on the social costs of neoliberalism. Berger was awarded the 2020 Kapp Prize by the Association for Ecological Economics in Germany. His scholarship also focuses on the history and poetic-hermeneutic foundations of economic knowledge. Areas of research: Institutional Economics, Social Economics, Ecological Economics, Business Ethics, History of Economic Thought, Political Economy.

June Carbone

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

June Carbone

June Carbone is the Robina Chair in Law, Science and Technology at the University of Minnesota. Carbone is an expert in family law, assisted reproduction, property, and law, medicine and bioethics, and also has taught contracts, remedies, financial institutions, civil procedure, and feminist jurisprudence.

Faisal Chaudhry

Faisal Chaudhry.

Faisal Chaudhry

Faisal Chaudhry, Assistant Professor of Law & History, and Hanley Institute Sustainability Scholar at the University of Dayton, is a scholar of the contemporary world. His interests are in the legal-institutional underpinnings of the market and the interaction between law, distributional justice, and sustainable economic development. His research explores concepts of property rights and economic rent as they apply to land/natural resource use and the innovation system.

Pamela Foohey

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Pamela Foohey

Pamela Foohey  is Professor of Law at Cordozo Law School. Her research centers on bankruptcy, commercial law, and consumer law. She is a co-investigator on the Consumer Bankruptcy Project,  a long-term research project studying persons who file bankruptcy. The results of this research have been featured in top media outlets, including The New York Times, Financial Times, NPR, U.S. News & World Report, and The Washington Post. 

Judy Fudge

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Judy Fudge

Judy Fudge is the LIUNA Enrico Henry Mancinelli Professor of Global Labour Issues at McMaster University. She takes a socio-legal approach to studying work and labour, and is committed to fostering a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding the challenges and opportunities facing workers. Her most recent work focuses on labour exploitation, modern slavery and unfree labour in the context of labour migration.

Sarah Haan

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Sarah Haan

Sarah C. Haan  writes at the intersection of corporate law and democracy, on subjects such as corporate governance, corporate political speech, and disclosure. Her scholarship has appeared in the Stanford Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, the Northwestern University Law Review, and other leading journals and blogs. In 2018, Professor Haan was awarded the Lewis Prize for excellence in legal scholarship.

John Haskell

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

John Haskell

John Haskell is a senior lecturer at the University of Manchester Law School and junior faculty at the Institute for Global Law and Policy (IGLP, Harvard Law School). Prior to Manchester, a Fulbright Scholar and held tenure track academic appointments in UK and US law schools. When not working, enjoy being a dad and negotiating entropy.

Jamee Moudud

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Jamee Moudud

Jamee K. Moudud is a Professor of Economics at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York. At the nexus of law and political economy, his current work focuses on the legal foundations of markets, the business enterprise, bank credit, central banking, and the ways in which power relations structure the economy.  Jamee is on the Board of APPEAL, and is among the co-founders of the Journal of Law and Political Economy (JLPE). He is currently working on a book entitled Legal and Political Foundations of Capitalism: the End of Laissez Faire? which will be published by Routledge as part of its Economics as Social Theory Series

 

Athena Mutua

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Athena Mutua

Athena D. Mutua,  Professor, Floyd H. & Hilda L. Hurst Faculty Scholar, UB School of Law, writes in the areas of critical race and feminist legal theory. Mutua's work explores issues of race and gender as they relate to class structures and introduces the concepts and boundaries of ClassCrits, a project she helped found.

Julie Nice

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Julie Nice

Julie Nice focuses her scholarly work on constitutional law, poverty law, and sexuality law. She is the lead author of Poverty Law: Theory and Practice, and has written numerous articles. Before she began teaching, she was a public interest litigator at the Legal Assistance Foundation of Chicago.

Lenore Palladino

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Lenore Pallidino

Lenore Palladino is an economist, lawyer, and assistant professor in the School of Public Policy and the Department of Economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  She is also a research associate at the UMass Political Economy Research Institute and a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute.

Frank Pasquale

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Frank Pasquale

Frank Pasquale,  Professor of Law, Brooklyn Law School,  is an expert on the law of artificial intelligence (AI), algorithms, and machine learning. Pasquale’s work on “algorithmic accountability” has helped bring the insights and demands of social justice movements to AI law and policy. He has developed a comprehensive legal analysis of regulation of Internet platforms. His work is among the leading legal research on regulation of algorithmic ranking, scoring, and sorting systems. He has written articles addressing technological and financial challenges to U.S. healthcare institutions, focusing on how regulators can help providers improve outcomes.

Kathryn Sabbeth

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Kathryn Sabbeth

Kathryn Sabbeth is an associate professor of law at the University of North Carolina. Her teaching and scholarship focus on public interest litigation, access to justice, and housing. Sabbeth explores the potential for lawyers to promote equality and the limits of that potential. Her courses at UNC have included the Civil Legal Assistance Clinic, Civil Lawyering Process, Employment Discrimination, and Legal Ethics and Social Justice. In the Civil Legal Assistance Clinic, Sabbeth’s students represent clients in housing, employment, and other racial and economic justice cases. Before joining the UNC faculty, Sabbeth taught at Georgetown University Law Center as a teaching fellow in a civil rights clinic and supervised federal litigation regarding employment discrimination, education equity, and public access to Guantánamo information.

Mark S. Silverman

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Mark S. Silverman

Mark S. Silverman, Assistant Professor of Economics, Franklin and Marshall College, has taught courses on: Economic Perspectives; Principles of Economics;  Microeconomics; History of Economic Thought; and, Law and Economics.

Karen Sokol

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Karen Sokol

Karen Sokol, Professor of Law at Loyola University New Orleans, teaches and writes about international law, climate law and accountability, courts and the rule of law, and torts.  She is an associate scholar with Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam’s Centre for Climate Change, Corporations and the Law, a member of the Climate Accountability Working Group of the Climate Social Science Network, a member of the Global Network for Human Rights and the Environment, a member-scholar of the Center for Progressive Reform, and received a Fulbright award for research in India. 

Faith Stevelman

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Faith Stevelman

Faith Stevelman  Professor of Law, New York Law School, is a national authority on corporate governance, securities law, and financial regulation. Her expertise spans the nuts and bolts of mergers and acquisitions and corporate finance to the conceptual underpinnings of board leadership and corporate disclosure. Always attuned to corporate law’s responsibility to support economic justice and transparency, Stevelman’s scholarship presents a new paradigm for corporate law. She is committed to fostering greater interdisciplinary depth in corporate legal scholarship.

Jennifer Taub

Exploring The Law and Political Economy Difference.

Jennifer Taub

Jennifer Taub Professor of Law, Western New England School of Law, is a legal scholar and advocate devoted to making complex business law topics engaging inside and outside of the classroom. Her research focuses on corporate governance, banking and financial market regulation, and white collar crime. Her advocacy centers on “follow the money”—promoting transparency and opposing corruption. She has written a book about the financial crisis entitled Other People's Houses (Yale Press 2014) and one about white collar crime in America called Big Dirty Money (Viking 2020).

Charles Whalen

Charles Whelan.

Charles Whelan

Charles J. Whalen, a research fellow at The Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy, is an economist with a career spanning three decades, a trustee of the American Association for Evolutionary Economics.  His recent books include Institutional Economics: Perspectives and Methods in Pursuit of a Better World (Routledge, 2022) and A Modern Guide to Post-Keynesian Institutional Economics (Edward Edgar, 2022).

Content updated May 16, 2022