The View

Invoking 25th Amendment will further divide nation, UB political scientist says

Sign for Republicans and Democrats facing in opposite directions.

Invoking the 25th Amendment to remove President Donald Trump from office will further divide an already-divided nation, UB political scientist James E. Campbell says.

By CORY NEALON

Published January 11, 2021

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headshot of James Campbell.
“It’s like pouring gasoline on a bonfire. ”
James Campbell, UB Distinguished Professor
Department of Political Science

UB political scientist James E. Campbell says invoking the 25th Amendment to remove President Donald Trump from office in the wake of the violence Wednesday at the U.S. Capitol will further divide an already-divided nation.

“If you want to heal the nation, I can’t think of a worse idea than using the 25th Amendment to remove President Trump. It’s like pouring gasoline on a bonfire,” says Campbell, UB Distinguished Professor of Political Science.

Campbell studies polarization and has written extensively on the subject, including his book “Polarized: Making Sense of a Divided America,” which was named to Choice’s 2016 list of Outstanding Academic Titles.

He says that even if lawmakers pull back from calls to invoke the 25th Amendment, the nation will remain deeply divided.

“I just don’t see people coming together, especially after a bitterly divisive campaign and contentious post-campaign controversies,” Campbell says. “There is a substantial divide over whether the 2020 presidential election was a free and fair election. Though most Democrats and the mainstream media believe that it was, polls indicate about three out of four Republicans believe it was not. This will, undoubtedly, fuel further polarized conflict in the coming years.”