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Daniel Kosman, PhD

As a member of the Faculty of 1000, Daniel Kosman, PhD, rates articles of special significance to his field and explains their importance.

Kosman Nominated to Faculty of 1000

Published March 28, 2013

Daniel Kosman, PhD, UB Distinguished Professor of biochemistry, has been named to the Faculty of 1000, joining a worldwide body of experts who select and evaluate the most significant articles from biomedical research publications for inclusion in the F1000 directory.

As a member of F1000’s biochemistry faculty, Kosman is one of 20 reviewers serving in the biocatalysis section.

Serving on F1000’s Biocatalysis Section

As a member of F1000’s biochemistry faculty, Kosman is one of 20 reviewers serving in the biocatalysis section.

He was nominated by section heads Stephen Benkovic, PhD, of Pennsylvania State University; Judith Klinman, PhD, of the University of California at Berkeley; and JoAnne Stubbe, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

“I’m honored that people who are at the top of the field would ask me to do this,” Kosman said, noting that all three section heads belong to the National Academy of Sciences.

“As a senior faculty member, I feel strongly that it’s my responsibility to serve my community. When you’re asked to serve by people you admire a great deal, it’s quite an honor.”

Highlighting Noteworthy Articles in Smaller Journals

Nominated to F1000 in March, Kosman has already had his first article evaluation published.

He says F1000Prime is particularly useful for spotlighting valuable articles that appear in lower-profile journals.

“Biocatalysis is quite broad, so some of the papers you see recommended in the directory are ones you might not have read if you picked up your favorite journal.

“This is a way of broadening the readership of articles that would be of interest to your own community.”

Articles recommended in F1000’s directory come from more than 3,500 journals.

Eighty-five percent of the articles do not originate in top-tier journals such as Nature or Cell.