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Crossroads Culinary Center

Photo of students eating in UB’s new Crossroads Culinary Center dining facility

The Crossroads Culinary Center on the North Campus is UB’s newest dining facility.

Located in the Red Jacket Quad of the Ellicott Complex on the North Campus, the Crossroads Culinary Center (C3 for short) is the university’s new residential dining center.

UB’s new Crossroads Culinary Center officially opened on October 25, 2012 and will serve more than 2,000 students per day. The $12-million project began construction in May 2010 and has added 10,000-square-foot of space to UB’s existing Red Jacket Dining Center and renovated an additional 20,000-square-feet.

With a seating capacity of more than 650, the Crossroads Culinary Center will replace the aging dining center in Richmond Hall, transforming Red Jacket’s 1970s-era dining center into a modern facility that will feature everything from Brazilian-style barbeque to authentic Asian food.

The center has been designed with a glass-walled lobby leading into the dining area which, unlike traditional dining halls, will feature Marché-style dining stations. The Marché concept is centered on fresh foods prepared to order in full view of customers at a variety of internationally and nationally themed stations.

Another aspect of the project was a focus on local manufacturing and sourcing materials from the Western New York area. About 30 Western New York companies are engaged in the project. New York state manufacturers Niagara Ceramics and Liberty Tabletop will supply the china and flatware, respectively, for the new dining center.

C3’s environmentally friendly design also sets a new standard for sustainable dining at UB. The facility is LEED silver certified (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), an environmental building rating system developed by the U.S. Green Building Council, and all pre- and post-consumer food scraps will be composted on site and the cooking oil recycled into biodiesel by Buffalo Biodiesel in Tonawanda.