Project Horseshoe Farm

Overview

Horseshoe Farm offers an intensive paid one-year (13-month) community-based gap year service and leadership development fellowship. It is geared to top recent college graduates from around the nation interested in community health and education, non-profit and organizational management, social entrepreneurship, and community service leadership.  

The competitive fellowship is a unique opportunity for high levels of responsibility and mentored hands on learning in a rapidly growing community based non-profit organization. Its aim is preparing citizen service leaders needed for tomorrow's communities.

Deadline

February

Eligibility Requirements

  • Must be a U.S. citizen to apply.
  • Intended for graduating seniors/recent graduates seeking a gap year opportunity.
  • Students from all majors accepted (especially those with interest in community-based service leadership or social entrepreneurial activities in healthcare, public health, education, social work, public policy, law, business and community leadership).
  • Though academic credentials will be taken into consideration, they also seek individuals with positive personal characteristics (i.e., maturity, empathy, integrity, strong work ethic).

How to Apply

Selection Process

The application deadline is February, for the fellowship class that will begin in June of the same year. After an initial review process of each application, qualified applicants will be contacted to schedule an initial interview with members of our selection committee. After these interviews, a final group of applicants will be invited to schedule a 30-minute interview with John Dorsey, MD. The selection committee will then discuss each application and notify each applicant (typically by mid to late March) whether they will be offered a position in the fellowship class. If you are offered a position in the fellowship class, to be fair to other applicants, you will have two days to decide whether to commit to the position.

Campus Liaison

Megan Stewart