Research Overview

Professor Bezrukova and student.

By visiting this website, you can access information grounded in rigorous research that will help you be a more informed diversity leader and empowered participant in creating a  diverse, equitable and inclusive workplace. For example, you will find information on:

  • How subtle biases—conscious and unconscious—undermine equity in organizations and what organizations should do to counteract and disrupt the adverse effects of such biases
  • What “works” in recruiting and retaining women and underrepresented minority employees
  • How anyone can be a better mentor, enhancing the effectiveness not only of female and underrepresented minority employees, students, and colleagues, but all employees, students, and colleagues
  • How you and your colleagues can use the psychology of workplace fairness and organizational culture to achieve diversity goals and engender greater employee engagement while doing so
  • How we can all contribute to creating more diverse and inclusive organizations

The research summarized here provides you with helpful guidance, fast facts and best practices in diversity, equity, and inclusion. 

The Center also actively works with University at Buffalo social scientists to encourage and promote their diversity, equity and inclusion research agendas. For example, CDI sponsors conferences, workshops and other events to bring together faculty, staff and student researchers from across schools/units, departments and fields to share works-in-progress and create opportunities for intra-university collaboration on critical diversity, equity and inclusion topics.

For more information, please contact Maura Belliveau, PhD, Center director.

Actionable Insights

5/7/19
Many organizations adopt one of two major themes to characterize their diversity programs:  a “valuing differences” or “valuing equality” approach. Both approaches are aimed at supporting diversity so you might think that each approach would be equally effective for all.

Focus on Facts

Does immigration lead to increased crime? Research indicates the answer is NO.

Average rates of the property crime index, burglary, and larceny across U.S. metropolitan areas, 1970-2010.

Research results in a line graph.

Source: Robert Adelman, Lesley Williams Reid, Gail Markle, Saskia Weiss & Charles Jaret (2017) Urban crime rates and the changing face of immigration: Evidence across four decades, Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice, 15:1, 52 77, DOI: 10.1080/15377938.2016.1261057