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University at Buffalo

UB Undergraduate Academic Schedule: Spring 2021


This information is updated nightly. Additional information about this course, including real-time course data, prerequisite and corequisite information, is available to current students via the HUB Student Center, which is accessible via MyUB.


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HIS 143LR - Global Inequality And Power
Lecture
Global Inequality And Power LAN Enrollment Information (not real time - data refreshed nightly)
Class #:   <<<  >>>   Enrollment Capacity:   100
Section:   LAN   Enrollment Total:   100
Credits:   3.00 credits   Seats Available:   0
Dates:   02/01/2021 - 05/07/2021   Status:   CLOSED
Days, Time:   M W , 12:40 PM - 1:30 PM
Room:   Remote view map
Location:   Remote      
Chained Courses
You must register in one of the class(es) below to get the above section:
Comments
HIS 143: Global Inequality and Power The increasing interaction of peoples and nations we call globalization benefits some more than others. This course focuses on the historical origins and consequences of a world divided between the rich and poor, the privileged and excluded, the mainstream and the marginalized. Fundamentally, it asks why some members of global society are considered more human and treated more humanely than others? Students will consider the divergence of a small number of developed nations, primarily in the northern hemisphere, from many more impoverished ones, primarily in the south. They will study the resulting hierarchies and tensions that structure social life around the globe and define the ?human? in ways that privilege some and disadvantage others. Topics may include racial, ethnic, and gender relations; religious and sectarian conflict; unequal access to technology, education, and health care; environmental degradation; and mass displacements of workers and refugees. The course emphasizes how individuals, communities, and societies have challenged dominant understandings of humanity, advanced alternative perspectives, and struggled for social justice. Concentrating first on the encounter of diverse peoples and cultures brought about by European expansion after 1400, we will proceed to analyze the historical forces set in motion by this meeting of North and South, West and East, including colonialism, imperialism, industrialization, nationalism, and decolonization. Our inquiry will also serve as an introduction to the study and practice of history. AAL
  Course Description
The increasing interaction of peoples and nations we call globalization benefits some more than others. This course focuses on the historical origins and consequences of a world divided between the rich and poor, the privileged and excluded, the mainstream and the marginalized. Students will consider, among various topics, the emergence of racial and ethnic categories, which accompanied the divergence of a small number of wealthy nations, primarily in the northern hemisphere, from many more poor ones, primarily in the south. They will examine resulting hierarchies that structure other realms of social life, including gender relations, religious conflict, access to education and technology, and environmental degradation. The course also explores how individuals, communities, and societies have challenged dominant understandings of the world, advanced alternative perspectives, and struggled for social justice. AAL
  Instructor(s)
             Langfur look up    
  On-line Resources
Other Courses Taught By: Langfur