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University at Buffalo

UB Undergraduate Academic Schedule: Spring 2021


This information is updated nightly. Additional information about this course, including real-time course data, prerequisite and corequisite information, is available to current students via the HUB Student Center, which is accessible via MyUB.


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FR 453SEM - African & Caribbean Lit
Lecture
African & Caribbean Lit FLA Enrollment Information (not real time - data refreshed nightly)
Class #:   23993   Enrollment Capacity:   24
Section:   FLA   Enrollment Total:   11
Credits:   3.00 credits   Seats Available:   13
Dates:   02/01/2021 - 05/07/2021   Status:   OPEN
Days, Time:   T R , 12:45 PM - 2:00 PM
Room:   Remote view map
Location:   Remote      
Comments
Spring 2021 focus: Change = Voices+Bodies+Movements+Reflexivity This course covers works by modern writers from Africa, the greater Caribbean, and their interconnecting diasporas and transnational contexts. A close look at storytelling traditions, aesthetic conventions, philosophical movements, and socio-political transformations helps students understand the ways in which texts of varied genres are created. Students also compare works in order to tease out the differences and similarities in literature across African and Caribbean cultures. By the end of the course students can discuss what terms like Africa,Caribbean,Afro-Caribbean, diaspora, and transnational mean and how the contact of world cultures shape their contours. They also gain a more thorough comprehension of the thought, lived experience, and artistic expression that lead to the writing of African and Caribbean literature. This course is the same as TH 453, and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.
  Course Description
This course covers works by modern writers from Africa, the greater Caribbean, and their interconnecting diasporas and transnational contexts. A close look at storytelling traditions, aesthetic conventions, philosophical movements, and socio-political transformations helps students understand the ways in which texts of varied genres are created. Students also compare works in order to tease out the differences and similarities in literature across African and Caribbean cultures. By the end of the course students can discuss what terms like Africa,Caribbean,Afro-Caribbean, diaspora, and transnational mean and how the contact of world cultures shape their contours. They also gain a more thorough comprehension of the thought, lived experience, and artistic expression that lead to the writing of African and Caribbean literature. This course is the same as TH 453, and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.
  Instructor(s)
             Flaugh look up    
  On-line Resources
Other Courses Taught By: Flaugh