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UB Undergraduate Academic Schedule: Spring 2022


This information is updated nightly. Additional information about this course, including real-time course data, prerequisite and corequisite information, is available to current students via the HUB Student Center, which is accessible via MyUB.


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APY 356SEM - Cultural Evolution
Lecture
Cultural Evolution LYC Enrollment Information (not real time - data refreshed nightly)
Class #:   19792   Enrollment Capacity:   25
Section:   LYC   Enrollment Total:   12
Credits:   3.00 credits   Seats Available:   13
Dates:   01/31/2022 - 05/13/2022   Status:   OPEN
Days, Time:   W , 4:00 PM - 6:40 PM
Room:   Academ 351 view map
Location:   North Campus      
Comments
Course satisfies problem-oriented/theoretical requirement for Anthropology majors and minors.
  Course Description
Humans pass on and receive information, consciously and unconsciously, via social interactions. Some of this information manifests itself in the form of cultural traditions; for example, artifacts spread over time and space or the languages we speak. Using a framework of social transmission theory, many anthropologists have increasingly turned to evolutionary theory and methodology to study cultural traditions in material artifacts, language, or other products of cultural transmission processes. This course enables students to explore the main theoretical and methodological aspects of using social transmission theory and cultural evolutionary principles to address human behavioral patterns. A large part of the class deals with evolutionary theory, and allows students to better understand evolutionary theory and its application. Case studies will be presented, which will highlight the broad range of data to which such approaches may be applied. We will consider a range of case studies from a diversity of chronological periods and geographic settings (including contemporary settings). You will also critically consider the concept of ¿culture,¿ its presence (or otherwise) in animals other than humans, and what this may mean for the study of cultural phenomena. Students will come to see how contemporary applications of this approach differ from previous (and often theoretically erroneous) applications of evolutionary principles to the study of human behavior, which negatively taint evolutionary approaches to humanity to this day. The course will also help to dispel common misconceptions regarding the use of evolutionary theory to study culture, but be sensitively astute as to the reasons why these issues arise. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of both the theoretical and practical (methodological) tools involved in this type of work, and be able to conceive of how to apply them across various aspects of anthropological research.
  Instructor(s)
             Lycett look up    
  On-line Resources
Other Courses Taught By: Lycett