August to November

The Baldy Center Podcast

Prison hallway.

Episode 4: Amanda Hughett discusses the history of prisoner labor unions

Published September 23, 2020

Episode 4 of the podcast features Amanda Hughett discussing the history of prisoner labor unions. The work examines how efforts to litigate around prison conditions in the 1970s unintentionally cut against imprisoned people’s efforts to mobilize at the grassroots level.

Keywords: Criminal Law and Procedure, Employment and Labor Law, Labor Markets and Work Policy, Human Rights, Civil Rights, Race, Law and Policy, Social Justice and Social Change

* PODCAST PLAYER — Please note: this audio player uses MP3 files; the component may have compatibility issues in RWD on small-screen devices.

Amanda Hughett, University of Illinois Springfield

Research Focus: : Criminal Law and Procedure, Employment and Labor Law, Labor Markets and Work Policy
Amanda Hughett.

Amanda Hughett

Amanda Hughett is an Assistant Professor of Legal Studies at the University of Illinois Springfield and an affiliated researcher at The Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy, where she spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow. She was previously a Law and Social Sciences Doctoral Fellow at the American Bar Foundation in Chicago, Illinois, and she received her PhD in History from Duke University in 2017. Currently, she is at work on her first book, Silencing the Cell Block: The Making of Modern Prison Policy in North Carolina and the Nation, which examines how civil liberties lawyers and public officials reshaped prison policy in response to prisoners' activism during the 1960s and 1970s. Hughett's manuscript was selected for participation in the American Society for Legal History’s Wallace Johnson First Book Program. Learn more.

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