Reaching Others University at Buffalo - The State University of New York
Skip to Content
UB Reporter

Research News

UB to salute faculty, staff authors

Salute to authors

The sixth "anthology" features 100 books authored, co-authored or edited by UB faculty and staff. Photo: Nancy J. Parisi

By SUE WUETCHER

Published May 1, 2014

“You have memorialized your ideas in books and this, in turn, shapes the university and builds its legacy.”
Alex Cartwright, vice president for research and economic development

UB will recognize more than 105 authors, contributing authors and editors at a reception being held from 3-5 p.m. May 5 in the Black Box Theatre in the Center for the Arts, North Campus.

“An Anthology of Recognition: The Sixth Salute to UB Authors” pays tribute to UB authors “for their significant contributions to the printed page.”

Those attending the reception are asked to register.

The reception honors UB authors who have published full-length scholarly books over the course of the past two years — from January 2012 through December 2013 — as well as those authors whose books may have been inadvertently missed since the first “anthology” was held in 2007.

More than 600 books have been authored or edited by UB faculty members since that first anthology.

Production of scholarly and creative works is an integral part of UB’s mission, says Alex Cartwright, vice president for research and economic development.

“As faculty authors at our highly regarded public research university, you truly have contributed to this important mission,” Cartwright wrote in the program for the event.

“You have used your scholarly and creative exploration to educate, and in choosing your topics, frequently have gone beyond the academic to serve the public by confronting the issues of our communities — locally, regionally and worldwide. You have memorialized your ideas in books and this, in turn, shapes the university and builds its legacy,” he said.

“You are architects of Western New York’s creative communities, helping to build a region that values innovation and discussion, supporting diversity of thought and strengthening opportunities in the knowledge economy.”

The 100 books being recognized represent a variety of disciplines, ranging from the humanities to the arts to the social, physical, biological and biomedical sciences, and include textbooks, volumes of poetry and e-books.

Authors who will be recognized at the reception, with their departments and book titles, are:

  • Richard Almon, Biological Sciences, “Drugs, Stress and Human Function.”
  • Dimitri Anastasopoulos, English, “Farm for Mutes.”
  • Jack Anchin, Psychology, “Unifying Psychotherapy: Principles, Methods, and Evidence from Clinical Science.”
  • Daniel Antonius, Psychiatry, “The Psychology of Terrorism Fears,” and editor, “The Political Psychology of Terrorism Fears.”
  • Michael Basinski, Poetry Collection, “Learning Poem About Learning About Being a Poet” and “Piglittuce.”
  • Ronald E. Batt, Obstetrics and Gynecology, “A History of Endometriosis.”
  • Rajan Batta, Industrial and Systems Engineering, editor, “Handbook of OR/MS Models in Hazardous Materials Transportation.”
  • Peter Biehl, Anthropology, “Heritage in the Context of Globalization: Europe and the Americas.”
  • Alex Bitterman, Urban Planning, “The College Question: Why college (as we know it) isn't working for the Millennial generation.”
  • Sampson Lee Blair, Sociology, editor, “Economic Stress and the Family.”
  • Dorothea Braemer, Media Study, “Ineffably Urban: Imaging Buffalo.”
  • Kazimierz Braun, Theatre and Dance, “Directing Rozewicz.”
  • John Edgar Browning, Transnational Studies and English, editor, “Teratological Anthology” and “Bram Stoker's Dracula: The Critical Feast, An Annotated Reference of Early Reviews and Reactions, 1897-1913” and “The Forgotten Writings of Bram Stoker” and “Graphic Horror: Movie Monster Memories” and “A Quarter Century of Student Life at Tulane: A Dean's Narrative History, 1949-1975.”
  • Michel Bruneau, Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, “The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer.”
  • Evan Calkins, Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, editor, “Get Up and Go!”
  • Deborah D.L. Chung, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, “Piloted to Serve” (English version) and editor, “The Road to Scientific Success: Inspiring Life Stories of Prominent Researchers, Vol. 2.”
  • Sebastian G. Ciancio, Periodontics and Endodontics, editor, “ADA/PDR Dental Therapeutics Online.”
  • Shelby Collins, Accounting and Law, “Skills for Accounting and Auditing Research.”
  • Robin L. Comeau, Dental Medicine, “Boom Town:The Early History of Tomahawk, Wisconsin 1886-1924” and “Images of America: Merrill.”
  • Gerard J. Connors, Research Institute on Addictions, “Substance Abuse Treatment and the Stages of Change, Second Edition.”
  • Catherine Cook-Cottone, Counseling, School and Educational Psychology, “Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance: Yoga and Life Skills to Empower” and “Healthy Eating in Schools: Evidence-Based Interventions to Help Kids Thrive.”
  • James R. Currie, Music, “Music and the Politics of Negation.”
  • Nathan Daun-Barnett, Educational Leadership and Policy, “College Counseling for Admissions Professionals.”
  • Ernesto De Nardin, Oral Biology, “Contemporary Clinical Immunology and Serology.”
  • Greg Dimitriadis, Educational Leadership and Policy, “Focus Groups: From Structured Interviews to Collective Conversations.”
  • Sergey Dolgopolski, Comparative Literature and Institute of Jewish Thought and Heritage, “The Open Past: Subjectivity and Remembering in the Talmud.”
  • Matthew S. Dryer, Linguistics, “A Grammatical Description of Kara-Lemakot.”
  • Debra DuBois, Biological Sciences, “Drugs, Stress and Human Function.”
  • Catherine N. Dulmus, Social Work, “Person-Centered Recovery Planner for Adults with Serious Mental Illness.”
  • Dinissa Duvanova, Political Science, “Building Business In Post-Communist Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia.”
  • Ali El Solh, Medicine, author and editor, “Critical Care Management of the Obese Patient.”
  • Peter Elkin, Biomedical Informatics, editor, “Terminology and Terminological Systems.”
  • Carole Emberton, History, “Beyond Redemption: Race, Violence, and the American South after the Civil War.”
  • Gregory Fabiano, Counseling, School and Educational Psycology, “Daily Behavior Report Cards: An Evidence-Based System for Assessment and Intervention.”
  • David Fertig, Linguistics, “Analogy and Morphological Change.”
  • Andre Filiatrault, Civil, Structural, and Environmental Engineering, “Elements of Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics, 3rd Edition.”
  • Christian Flaugh, Romance Languages and Literatures, “Operation Freak: Narrative, Identity, and the Spectrum of Bodily Abilities.”
  • Michael Frisch, History and American Studies, “Ineffably Urban: Imaging Buffalo.”
  • Michael R. Frone, Research Institute on Addictions, “Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use in the Workforce and Workplace.”
  • James A. Gardner, Law, “Election Law in the American Political System.”
  • Rodolphe Gasché, Comparative Literature, “Georges Bataille: Phenomenology and Phantasmatology” and “Geophilosophy: On Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's What is Philosophy?”
  • Jordan Geiger, Architecture, “Ineffably Urban: Imaging Buffalo.”
  • Michael Glick, Dental Medicine, author and editor, “The Oral-Systemic Health Connection.”
  • Venu Govindaraju, Computer Science and Engineering, editor, “Handbook of Statistics 31.”
  • Tracy Gregg, Geology, editor, “Modeling Volcanic Processes.”
  • Manish Gupta, Management Science and Systems, author and editor, “Strategic and Practical Approaches for Information Security Governance: Technologies and Applied Solutions.”
  • Graham Hammill, English, “The Mosaic Constitution: Political Theology and Imagination from Machiavelli to Milton” and “Political Theology and Early Modernity.”
  • Sara Haugli, Counseling, School and Educational Psychology, “Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance: Yoga and Life Skills to Empower.”
  • Christopher Hollister, University Libraries, “Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians.”
  • Maria S. Horne, Theatre and Dance, “Theatre Pedagogy.”
  • David Johnson, Comparative Literature, “Kant's Dog: On Borges, Philosophy, and the Time of Translation.”
  • Josep M. Jornet, Electrical Engineering, “Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Nanonetworks in the Terahertz Band.”
  • Emily Keddie, Counseling, School and Educational Psychology, “Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance: Yoga and Life Skills to Empower.”
  • Debra Kolodczak, Communication, associate editor, ““Get Up and Go!”
  • Tevfik Kosar, Computer Science and Engineering, author and editor, “Data Intensive Distributed Computing: Challenges and Solutions for Large-scale Information Management.”
  • Changhyun Kwon, Industrial and Systems Engineering, editor, “Handbook of OR/MS Models in Hazardous Materials Transportation.”
  • Jeffrey Lacker, Medicine, “Controlling IBS the Drug-Free Way: A 10-Step Plan for Symptom Relief.”
  • Eaton E. Lattman, Structural Biology, “Protein Crystallography: A Concise Guide.”
  • Carl Lee, Media Study, “Ineffably Urban: Imaging Buffalo.”
  • Jerrold Lerman, Anesthesiology, “A Practice of Anesthesia for Infants and Children: Fifth Edition.”
  • Joan Linder, Visual Studies, “Ineffably Urban: Imaging Buffalo.”
  • Arabella Lyon, English, “Deliberative Acts: Democracy, Rhetoric, and Rights.”
  • Karen Mac Cormack, English, “Against White.”
  • Dennis Maher, Architecture, “Ineffably Urban: Imaging Buffalo.”
  • Jordana L. Maisel, Architecture, “Universal Design: Creating Inclusive Environments.”
  • Lynn Mather, Law, editor, “Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context.”
  • James Maynard, Poetry Collection, editor, “Robert Duncan: Collected Essays and Other Prose.”
  • Stephen McCaffery, English, “The Darkness of the Present: Poetics, Anachronism and the Anomaly.”
  • Scott T. Meier, Counseling, School and Educational Psychology, “Language and Narratives in Counseling and Psychotherapy.”
  • Eduardo Mercado, Psychology, “Learning and Memory: From Brain to Behavior, Second Edition.”
  • Steven Miller, English, “War After Death: On Violence and Its Limits.”
  • Vasiliki Neofotistos, Anthropology, “The Risk of War: Everyday Sociality in the Republic of Macedonia.”
  • Amanda Nickerson, Counseling, School and Educational Psychology, editor, “Handbook of School Violence and School Safety: International Research and Practice, Second Edition.”
  • Kalliopi Nikolopoulou, Comparative Literature, “Tragically Speaking: On the Use and Abuse of Theory for Life.”
  • Miriam Paeslack, Arts Management, editor, “Ineffably Urban: Imaging Buffalo.”
  • Kelly Patterson, Social Work, editor, “Schools and Urban Revitalization: Rethinking Institutions and Community Development.”
  • Davina Porock, Nursing, “People Nursing: Pocket Mentor Series.”
  • Paras Prasad, Chemistry, “Introduction to Nanomedicine and Nanobioengineering.”
  • Gail Radford, History, “The Rise of the Public Authority: Statebuilding and Economic Development in Twentieth-Century America.”
  • John P. Richard, Chemistry, “Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry, Volume 45.”
  • Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, Biotechnical and Clinical Laboratory Sciences, “Contemporary Clinical Immunology and Serology.”
  • Maria Runfola, Learning and Instruction, editor, “TIPS: The Child Voice.”
  • Martha Salzman, Accounting and Law, “Skills for Accounting and Auditing Research.”
  • Kris Schindler, Computer Science and Engineering, “Introduction to Microprocessor Based Systems Using the ARM Processor, Second Edition.”
  • Maryanne Schultz, Architecture, “An Archaeological Survey of the Gournia Landscape.”
  • Raj Sharman, Management Science and Systems, editor, “Strategic and Practical Approaches for Information Security Governance: Technologies and Applied Solutions."
  • Robert Shibley, Architecture, “Partnering Strategies for the Urban Edge.”
  • Robert Silverman, Urban and Regional Planning, "Schools and Urban Revitalization: Rethinking Institutions and Community Development.”
  • Natalie Simpson, Operations Management and Strategy, “Practical Operations Management.”
  • Hadas Steiner, Architecture, “Ineffably Urban: Imaging Buffalo.”
  • Edward Steinfeld, Architecture, “Universal Design: Creating Inclusive Environments.”
  • Harry Sultz, Medicine, “Health Care USA, Understanding Its Organization and Delivery.”
  • Zhi Sun, Electrical Engineering, “Key Communication Techniques for Underground Sensor Networks.”
  • Dennis Tedlock, English, “An Archaeology of Architecture.”
  • Jean-Jacques Thomas, Romance Languages and Literatures, Oulipo@50.
  • Liana Vardi, History, “The Physiocrats and the World of the Enlightenment.”
  • Mark Voisinet, Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, “Solidworks tutor.”
  • Vance L. Watrous, Visual Studies, “An Archaeological Survey of the Gournia Landscape.”
  • Barbara Wejnert, Transnational Studies, “Diffusion of Democracy: The Past and Future of Global Democracy.”
  • Joseph Woelfel, Communication, “The Culture of Science: Is Social Science Science?”
  • Victoria W. Wolcott, History, “Race, Riots, and Roller Coasters: The Struggle Over Segregated Recreation in America.”
  • Roger D. Woodard, Classics, “Myth, Ritual, and the Warrior in Roman and Indo-European Antiquity.”
  • Cynthia Wu, Transnational Studies, “Chang and Eng Reconnected: The Original Siamese Twins in American Culture.”
  • Kristina Young, Epidemiology and Environmental Health, “Health Care USA, Understanding Its Organization and Delivery.”
  • Paul Zarembka, Economics, editor, “Contradictions: Finance, Greed, and Labor Unequally Paid.”
  • Ewa Plonowska Ziarek, Comparative Literature, “Feminist Aesthetics and the Politics of Modernism.”
  • Krzysztof Ziarek, Comparative Literature, “Language After Heidegger."