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Venu Govindaraju named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

Venu Govindaraju (center, sitting down) with at the University at Buffalo.

Release Date: December 15, 2015

Venu Govindaraju
The peer-nominated honor is given to academic researchers who have created or facilitated outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.

BUFFALO, N.Y. – Venu Govindaraju, a globally recognized expert in machine learning and pattern recognition, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

The peer-nominated honor is given to academic researchers who have created or facilitated outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.

The 168 named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 582, representing more than 190 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. They will be inducted on April 15, 2016 at the fifth annual conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Virginia.

Govindaraju is UB’s interim vice president for research and economic development, and a SUNY Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Engineering.

He has designed several algorithms for cursive handwriting recognition suitable for real-time applications. His work in multilingual recognition systems ranges from the development of Devanagari optical character recognition (OCR) resources under the National Science Foundation’s Digital Libraries initiative, to innovative recognition strategies for Arabic OCR for the U.S. Department of Defense. He was among the first to explore human-like handwriting for designing CAPTCHAs (the computer test that requires users to type letters of a distorted image in a box to access content) to exploit the differential in handwriting reading proficiency between humans and machines.

He and colleagues at UB also helped create a handwriting recognition program that was essential to the first, field-deployable, real-time system for reading handwritten addresses on pieces of mail. The system saved the U.S. Postal Service hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

In biometrics, he has developed new techniques to address problems in the recognition of fingerprints, faces, facial expressions and multi-biometric fusion. He is the founding director of UB’s Center for Unified Biometrics and Sensors (CUBS) and has spearheaded the establishment of a National Science Foundation Center for Identification Technology Research (CITeR) at UB.

Govindaraju has co-authored about 400 scientific papers, published five edited books and mentored 30 UB PhD students. He is currently advising eight UB doctoral candidates.

Among the honors he has received are the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in 2014, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Technical Achievement Award in 2010 and the MIT Global Indus Technovator Award in 2004. He is a fellow of prestigious societies such as AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science), the IAPR (International Association of Pattern Recognition), and the SPIE (International Society of Optics and Photonics).

Govindaraju belongs to a select group of computer scientists who have been named fellows of both the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the IEEE.

Govindaraju is a graduate of the Indian Institute of Technology in Kharagpur, India. He has received master’s and doctoral degrees in computer science from UB.

About the National Academy of Inventors®: It is a 501(c)(3) non-profit member organization comprised of U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutions, with over 3,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 200 institutions, and growing rapidly. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI edits the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation, published by Cognizant Communication Corporation (NY).

Media Contact Information

Cory Nealon
News Content Manager
Engineering, Computer Science, Economic Development
Tel: 716-645-4614
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
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