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Korean Choreographer, Dancer to be in Residence at UB in November

By Kelli Bocock-Natale

Release Date: October 23, 2002

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Korean choreographer and dancer In-Young Sohn will be in residence at the University at Buffalo from Nov. 4-13, 2002. Her residency and a performance by the artist will be sponsored by the UB Department of Theatre and Dance, Asian Studies Program, College of Arts and Sciences, Korea Foundation, the Dae-Han Foundation and the Center for the Arts.

In-Young Sohn is a Seoul-based choreographer affiliated with the Korean National University of Arts, and previously was artistic director of the Seoul Performing Arts Company. From 1994-98 she taught Korean dance at Columbia University and Queens College of CUNY. While Sohn is well versed in traditional Korean dance, she is also trained and experienced in Western modern dance forms.

During her stay at UB, Sohn will present dance and theater master classes and set an original choreographic work with the Zodiaque Studio Dance Ensemble. She will lecture on Korean dance in dance history and performance appreciation classes, as well as conduct a workshop at the Buffalo Academy of Visual and Performing Arts.

She also will speak as part of "Asia at Noon," an informal gathering of students, faculty and community members, from noon to 1 p.m. Nov. 8 in 830 Clemens Hall, North Campus. Her subject will be "Learning New Steps: Dance after the Reunification of Korea."

Sohn and UB dance students will present a performance of traditional and contemporary Korean dance at 7 p.m. Nov. 13 in the Katharine Cornell Theatre in the Ellicott Complex on the North Campus. The performance, which is free and open to the public, will incorporate a variety of dance forms inspired by Korean motifs, with commentary by Sohn.

The Residency in Korean Dance is one of a series of Asian arts residencies initiated by the Asian Studies Program. The first took place in February 1999 with classes and a performance by two noh actors from Japan. Other residency projects have brought Asian American video makers to the Department of Media Study, Asian American artists to the Department of Art and Chinese artists to the University Gallery. Korean komungo musician Jin Hi Kim taught and performed in the Department of Music in October 2001. Noh actors will return to UB in 2004.

For more information, contact Thomas Burkman, director or Asian studies, at 645-3474, ext. 1.