A portable brain scanner with telemonitoring platform in low-resource countries and Economic viability of therapeutic hypothermia technology in low-resource countries - an industry perspective

Published May 3, 2017

Two exciting speakers will be talking at Hayes Hall this week sponsored by the UB Community of Excellence in Global Health Equity:

A portable brain scanner with telemonitoring platform in low-resource countries
Anirban Dutta, PhD, Assistant Professor Biomedical Engineering, UB

Economic viability of therapeutic hypothermia technology in low-resource countries - an industry perspective
Ashvinikumar (Ashvin) Mudaliar, PhD, Technology Consultant, Arogya MedTech, India

“Currently no affordable point-of-care technology exists to detect, monitor and manage hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy”

May 4, 2017 | 4-5 pm | 220 Hayes Hall

Of the Three million neonatal deaths globally in 2012, 779,000 took place in India. In India, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) contributes to 20% of neonatal mortality (NMR) and 50% of early neonatal mortality (ENM) - 400 children losing their lives daily in India to HIE alone. NMR is disproportionately high in rural area and among poor and hard to reach, vulnerable population. As NMR is a major health care delivery indicator, this reveals a unique vulnerable group who can benefit from improved physiology-based treatment during HIE at remote point-of-care for "intact survival". But currently no affordable point-of-care technology exists to detect, monitor and manage HIE. Structural imaging (CT/ MRI/ Ultrasound) is far and few in India and healthcare resources, such as radiologists, neonatologists are scarce. This two fold scarcity of technology and manpower causes "delayed detection and intervention” resulting in high mortality in HIE among neonates, especially in rural India. Hence providing an affordable brain monitoring system allowing early identification and management of HIE at point-of-care by community health worker (CHW), such as an Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) or ANM (Auxiliary Nurse Midwifery) will be a paradigm-shift in neonatal care.

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