Upcoming Events

Reclaiming Our Ancestors: Where I Am From: Creative Writing Workshop

Thu. Feb 22, 4:00 - 7:00 pm, Main Street Gallery, 515 Main Street  Buffalo, NY   
Free and open to public, registration required

You are cordially invited to this creative writing workshop to create your own poetry, prose, and stories grounded in ancestry and home. Several writers of the African diaspora who presented at the Reclaiming Our Ancestors Conference in Buffalo in October 2017 will facilitate. This workshop is designed for ages 13 and up. Participants are encouraged to bring an item that connects them to the place where they are from.  For more information and to register:

http://humanitiesinstitute.buffalo.edu/event/reclaiming-our-ancestors-where-i-am-from-creative-writing-workshop/

“The Visibly Absent Child: Conspicuous Reproduction, Active Fatherhood, and Childlessness in Reunified Berlin” Dr. Meghana Joshi, Central Washington University

Fri. Feb 23
Dr. Meghana Joshi, Central Washington University
2:00 PM, Fillmore 354 (Ellicott Complex)    Free

Anthropology Department Job Talk. All the talks will be held in Fillmore 354 (Ellicott Complex) and will be followed by a teaching demonstration. 

Feminist Research Alliance Workshop

Abigaël Candelas de la Ossa
Assistant Professor, Linguistics

Wednesday, February 28, 2018
12:00 - 1:30 pm, 207 UB Commons
UB North Campus

 

 


"Merely diversifying?: Intersectional experience in resources for survivors of sexual violence"

Sponsored by the Feminist Research Alliance Workshop and the Gender Institute.

“‘So, I Can Change My Mind, I Guess’: Reproductive Decision Making among Latinos/as in Dallas,Texas”

Fri. March 2
Ms. Jessica Lott, PhD candidate, Southern Methodist University
2:00 PM, Fillmore 354 (Ellicott Complex)   Free

Anthropology Department Job Talk. All the talks will be held in Fillmore 354 (Ellicott Complex) and will be followed by a teaching demonstration. 

Interactive Panel: Behind the Headlines: OBGYN in the age of Larry Nasser

 Tues. March 6, 12:00 – 1:30 PM
210 Student Union, UB North Campus     Free

This panel will discuss topics including: 

·       What is appropriate/inappropriate in an OBGYN and other medical physical exam?
·       What to do if you feel uncomfortable in interactions with your physician?
·       Discussing abuse with your physician.  
·       Accompanying minors to Dr. Visits.
·       Resources and support available at UB.

The panel will include:  Dr. Faye Justicia Linde, Director of Medical Student Education, OBGYN, Sharon Nolan Weiss - Director of the Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, Stephanie Berglas – Student, Global Gender Studies .

Sponsored by the UB Gender Institute Sex, Gender, Health Committee, UB OBGYN Department, UB Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion.

LGBTQ Student Dinner & Film Screening

March 6, 2018, 6:00 pm
UB Intercultural and Diversity Center
240 Student Union, UB North Campus

This event cosponsored by the UB Intercultural Diversity Center (IDC) and the Gender Institute is open to all students. The March 2018 IDC LGBTQ Dinner celebrates Women’s History Month with a screening of the award-winning documentary Major!, about 75 year-old Black transgender elder and activist Miss Major Griffin-Gracy. 

Jayna Zweiman of the Pussyhat Project

March 7, 2018, 6pm
403 Hayes Hall, UB South Campus

The Gender Institute joins the UB School of Architecture in welcoming Jayna Zweiman, an architect, and cofounder of the Pussyhat Project. Jayna has emerged as a national voice for craftivism (craft + activism), and her most recent project, Welcome Blanket, now on exhibit in Chicago, focuses on immigration.

Women in STEM Cooperative

March 14, 2018, 12:00-1:30 pm
Series Wrap


Speakers:

Please Register for the webinar to receive the link. (The webinar can be viewed online from any device.)

We will have a physical location for a Watch Party:
208 Davis Hall, UB North Campus.

For more information and to view previous recordings: 
http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/womeninstem/stem-online-series.html
Sponsored by the UB Women in STEM Cooperative and Cornell University

Black Buffalo Clubwomen and the Suffrage Movement

Thurs. March 15, 2018                   
5:00-6:30 pm
Niagara Falls Underground Railroad Heritage Center, 825 Depot Ave W., Niagara Falls, NY, 14305

A Celebration of the New York State Women's Suffrage Centennial at Niagara University
Part two of the series

Dr. Lillian Williams, Associate Professor of the Department of Transnational Studies at the University at Buffalo, will speak on her research about Mary Talbert, the Phyllis Wheatley Club, and the National Association for Colored Women, and their fight for both the vote and human dignity. Talbert was instrumental in organizing black women in the region to fight for their rights, and tried to work with white suffragists to gain the vote.

Contact: Sharron Risk, Deparment of History at Niagara University, srisk@niagara.edu

Women Voted in New York Before Columbus

Tues. March 27, 2018                 
5:00-6:30 pm
Multi-Purpose Room (MPR) in Gallagher Hall, Niagara University, 5795 Lewiston Rd, Niagara Falls, NY 14109

A Celebration of the New York State Women's Suffrage Centennial at Niagara University.

Part three of the series:

Dr. Sally Roesch-Wagner, a New York Council for the Humanities Scholar, will talk about the Haudenosaunee women of New York and their equal rights society that influenced the early suffragists. Haudenosaunee women owned the land, the children, and the food and resources. Their husbands took their wives’ family names, and women voted on and removed male political representatives. Haudenosaunee women demonstrated to the suffragists that egalitarian society was possible.

Contact: Sharron Risk, Deparment of History at Niagara University, srisk@niagara.edu

Feminist Research Alliance Workshop

Dr. Coleen Carrigan
Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Science, Technology and Society (STS)
California Polytechnic State University

Thursday, April 12, 2018
12:00 - 1:30 pm, 207 UB Commons
UB North Campus

“Innovative Methods to Advance Cultural Change in STEM”   
Using ethnography, Dr. Carrigan, investigates the historical and cultural dimensions of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and why these high-status fields appear impervious to desegregation. Carrigan shares the findings from her research to foster welcoming environments for underrepresented groups in STEM and transform the powers of technology to advance social justice.

Gender Institute Spring Lecture

"Working Around the Incommensurate: Brown Jouissance and Kara Walker's A Subtlety


Amber Jamilla Musser, Washington University, St. Louis

April 19, 2018, 120 Clemens Hall, UB North Campus
3:30 - 5:30 PM

Dr. Amber Jamilla Musser's research is at the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality studies. Her monograph, Sensational Flesh: Race, Power, and Masochism (NYU Press, 2014) uses masochism as a lens to theorize different felt relationships to power. The book beings together debates on masochism within feminism, discussions of masochism from psychoanalysis and critiques of colonialism, literary presentations of masochism, and performance and visual art that draws on masochism's repertoire in order to make an argument about the relationship between sensation and knowledge production and the racialization of our current episteme of sexuality. Her current research project, "Brown Jouissance: Feminine Imaginings" uses women of color's aesthetic labors to re-imagine epistemologies of sexuality so that they center brown femininity.

The New York State Women’s Suffrage Movement

Fri. April 20, 2018
5:00-6:30 pm
Multi-Purpose Room (MPR) in Gallagher Hall, Niagara University, 5795 Lewiston Rd, Niagara Falls, NY 14109

A Celebration of the New York State Women's Suffrage Centennial at Niagara University
Part four of the series

Dr. Susan Goodier and Dr. Karen Pastorello will discuss the story of the New York State women’s suffrage movement that culminated in women gaining the right to vote in 1917, three years before the national amendment was passed. They will detail how New York suffragists were the vanguard for the movement, and their success provided the momentum for the national amendment.

Contact: Sharron Risk, Deparment of History at Niagara University, srisk@niagara.edu

Feminist Research Alliance Workshop

Robert Keefe
Associate Professor, Social Work

Wednesday, April 25, 2018
12:00 - 1:30 pm, 207 UB Commons
UB North Campus

“I had to carry the burden by myself”: Low-income mothers of color with postpartum depression discuss being a good mother

Limited empirical research addresses the meaning of good mothering for low-income African American and Latina women experiencing postpartum depression. This presentation considers these women’s struggles to be good mothers despite their experience with limited access to appropriate and adequate health and mental health resources, which perpetuates their depression.

Bracha Lichtenberg Ettinger, Artist-in-Residence


UB’s Center for the Study of Psychoanalysis & Culture as a Creative Arts Initiative
             will host 
Bracha Lichtenberg Ettinger
.

 

 


Events:

Memory’s Wound Is a Space With-in: Depth-space and Carriance beyond Abstraction and Empathy
Mini-Seminar
April 26, May 3, May 10
12:30-3:10PM

UB Anderson Gallery, Seminar Room, 1 Martha Jackson Place

Bracha Lichtenberg Ettinger: Pietà—Eurydice—Medusa
Art Exhibition
Opening May 4
UB Anderson Gallery, 1 Martha Jackson Place

Bracha L. Ettinger is an internationally renowned artist-painter, artist-theorist and psychoanalyst working between Paris and Tel Aviv. She is the author of The Matrixial Gaze and The Matrixial Borderspace on trauma, memory, feminine subjectivity, maternality, ethics and aesthetics. Her recent shows include: The Haunted House / The Human Condition. National Center for Contemporary Art, Moscow and The 14th Istanbul Biennial. She is a Professor of Art and Psychoanalysis at The European Graduate School, Saas-Fee, Switzerland.

Central to her work is an attempt to move beyond classic distinction between artistic abstraction and empathy. With her paintings, videos, and notebooks, she calls into question the primacy of the surface in art and raises awareness of the potential of the feminine and what she calls its “matrixial womb-depth-space” in us and in the cosmos. Does art still possess the capacity to humanize us? For Ettinger, this is only possible if it works toward an abstraction that touches upon the wounds of human memory and the traces of an archaic “carriance” (the carrying of the living and the dead, the experience of being carried and cared-for, caring); by witnessing with, for, and to the other and the self.

Feminist Research Alliance Workshop

Ana Mariella Bacigalupo 
Professor, Anthropology

Wednesday, May 2, 2018
12:00 - 1:30 pm, 207 UB Commons
UB North Campus


"Judge Karen Atala’s Transformative Vision and her LGBT Rights Child Custody Case: Shamanic Justice and International Human Rights in Chile"

In her LGBT custody case, Chilean Judge Karen Atala drew on the discourse of international human rights as well as the power obtained from a shamanic vision which transformed her sexuality  to challenge the Catholic moral criteria used by the Chilean Supreme Court to deny her custody of her children because of her lesbianism. Atala’s case furthers understanding of the role that religion and spirituality play in sexual identities, legal practice and notions of justice.