Upcoming Events

Fall 2020

Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture

Mishuana Goeman.

Mishuana Goeman


“Electric Lights, Tourist Sights: Gendering Dispossession and Settler Colonial Infrastructure at Niagara Falls”

 






December 3, 2020  -  Zoom platform
 
Mishuana Goeman is a a 2020-2021 UB Center for Diversity Innovation Distinguished Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor of Gender Studies, American Indian Studies, and affiliated faculty of Critical Race Studies in the Law School, UCLA Presented in conjunction with the Center for Diversity Innovation.

RSVP here for the Zoom link:
https://bit.ly/MishuanaGoemanUBGenderIn

(note: if previously registered, you will receive the updated link)

ASCE WOMEN-WATER NEXUS SERIES

ASCE Women-Water Series flyer.


December 4, 2020   12:00 pm  EST
Webinar Platform: Zoom

Featuring international panelists from Australia, Germany, Iran and the United Kingdom.

RSVP for the link: https://tinyurl.com/y32jg2nn

Spring 2021 Preview

Feminist Research Alliance Workshop

Libby Otto.

Libby Otto

Associate Professor
Global Gender Sexuality Studies

Wed., February 10, 2021 
12:00 - 1:30pm
Zoom Platform

 

 

To register to receive a link, please go to: 
https://bit.ly/GI-FRA

Feminist Research Alliance Workshop

Melinda Lemke.

Melinda Lemke

Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Education

Wednesday, March 3, 2021 
12:00 - 1:30pm
Zoom Platform

 

To register to receive a link, please go to: 
https://bit.ly/GI-FRA

Feminist Research Alliance Workshop

Katharina Barth.

Katharina Barth

Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

Wednesday, March 17, 2020
12:00 - 1:30 pm 
Zoom Platform


To register to receive a link, please go to: 
https://bit.ly/GI-FRA

"Preaching Guilt: Religion and Experiences of Painful Sex in College Women"

This research project investigated the relationship between women college students’ pelvic health, sexuality, and religiosity. Currently 20-26% of young women report chronic pain during sexual activity, which is generally a highly preventable and treatable condition. Considering that young girls and women grow up with strong messages about permissible and taboo sexual conduct, gendered expectations of what constitutes “normal” pain-free sex, and the privileging of vaginal-penile intercourse over other forms of non-penetrative sexual activity, we tested if religiosity and religious teachings were contributing factors to women’s experiences of painful sex. Specifically, we examined the relationship between the prevalence of genito-pelvic pain with sex among sexually active female college students based on their sexual conceptualizations and practices, religious self-identification, belief and exposure to religious teachings, and the experiences of sexual shaming and guilt. 

Professor Barth's research centers around women’s reproductive health, agency, and rights in the United States, and specifically on experiences of genito-pelvic pain and psychosocial factors of painful sexual intercourse in young women. Her second line of research encompasses MENA/Arab/Muslim+ women’s perceptions of ethnic identity at the intersection of geopolitical, sociocultural, religious, and gendered factors.