Fish Inspired Robot With Reduced Inertial Recoil

robot fish.

This project aims to develop and test a new fish-inspired robot that minimizes undesirable inertial recoil found in traditional fish swimming, while being capable of achieving high speeds and efficiency.

Project description

In nature, fish are known for their advanced swimming capabilities and have been shown to demonstrate excellent agility, maneuverability, and efficiency. While there are a number of robotic systems that have been developed to accurately mimic the locomotion and form of fish, there are few tested systems that are designed for exploration/utility. In order to apply the biomechanics of fish swimming to an exploratory robotic system, this project aims to develop and test a new fish-inspired robot that minimizes undesirable inertial recoil found in traditional fish swimming, while being capable of achieving high speeds and efficiency.

Individuals will work closely with a CRASH Lab post-doc that has experience in both the biomechanics and hydrodynamics of fish swimming, and has developed several bio-inspired robotic systems in the past. The post-doc will be providing direction and support to the undergraduate students to ensure the project’s success. This is an opportunity for students to gain invaluable hands on design experience developing a unique and innovative system.

Project outcome

The specific outcomes of this project will be identified by the faculty mentor at the beginning of your collaboration. 

Project details

Timing, eligibility and other details
Length of commitment About a semester (3-5 months)
Start time Fall
Level of collaboration Large group collaboration
Benefits Academic Credit, Volunteer
Who is eligible Mechatronics, programming, 3D printing, and/or CAD experience
Support Funding is available after the completion of the preparation badge. See below.
Goldwater and the National Science Foundation

Students participating in this project might be interested in and eligible for the Goldwater Scholarship and the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Connect with the Office of Fellowships and Scholarships to learn more.

Project mentor

Javid Bayandor

Associate Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1004 Furnas Hall

Phone: 716-645-1422

Email: bayandor@buffalo.edu

Preparation

To engage with this project, you will work through a series of Project-Based Collaboration digital badges to guide your experience. 

To get started, contact the project mentor using the contact information above to discuss availability and after you’ve received approval, you can start the Project Preparation Digital Badge. Here are helpful tips on how to contact a project mentor

Preparation guidance

Once you have registered for the Project Preparation Digital Badge, you will receive further instructions related to the activities you will need to complete. In addition, you will also complete the following preparation activities for this particular project:

  • Write a 3-page literature review summarizing at least 10 articles on the mechanics of fishing, swimming, and/or the design and testing of fish inspired robots. Visit a subject librarian for support with this preparation activity.