Effects of Cigarette Filter Ventilation on Cigarette Appeal and Preferences for Combusted and Noncombusted Tobacco Products

O’Connor | Bradizza
This project will assess whether removing ventilation from cigarette filters lowers cigarette product appeal among smokers.

The physical design features of cigarette products directly impact their appeal by influencing both cognitive and sensory perceptions. Ventilated cigarettes dilute smoke, which promotes perceptions of “smoothness” and therefore lower health risk, contributing to the overall appeal of these products. These perceptions and beliefs are further shaped by cigarette manufacturers’ use of descriptive terms and colors on packaging designs and advertising. In this project, researchers will assess whether removing ventilation from cigarette filters lowers cigarette product appeal among smokers. This study thus will determine whether a regulatory requirement to reduce ventilation will lower demand for cigarettes without unintended consequences. In addition, this project will show how product appeal and risk perceptions of unventilated filters are influenced by the descriptive terms and colors used on cigarette packaging to communicate ventilation features. Finally, they will Examine how filter ventilation, product packaging, and experience of real-world product use combine to influence appeal and risk perceptions, and willingness to quit or switch to an Alternative Nicotine Delivery (AND) product.

Principal Investigator
Richard J. O’Connor, PhD
University of Minnesota

Co-Investigators
Clara Bradizza, PhD
Research Institute on Addictions

Funding Agency
National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Grant Number
P01-CA217806-5794

Dates
2017-2022