Prenatal Tobacco and Cannabis Exposure: A Translational Study

Eiden | Thanos
Researchers will address the large public health problem of comorbid use of tobacco and cannabis during pregnancy.

Tobacco and cannabis are often used together even during pregnancy. Rates of this polysubstance use have been increasing, and there have been increases in potency of cannabis in recent years. Translational studies with human and animal models are essential for understanding not only the public health impact of co-occurring use but also the biological mechanisms for such impact. Understanding these biological processes in animals and complexities of such exposure in humans are crucial for understanding prenatal origins of health and disease and developing interventions for exposed children. The broad goal of this study is to address the large public health problem of comorbid use of tobacco and cannabis during pregnancy and increase understanding of mechanisms of effect by using translational science with synergistic human and animal designs.

Co-Principal Investigators
Rina Das Eiden, PhD
Clinical and Research Institute on Addictions
Department of Psychiatry

Panayotis (Peter) K. Thanos, PhD
Clinical and Research Institute on Addictions
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology

Funding Agency
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Grant Number
R21-DA045640

Dates
2018-2020