University at Buffalo

UB Undergraduate Academic Schedule: Spring 2018


  • This information is updated nightly. Additional information about this course, including real-time course data, prerequisite and corequisite information, is available to current students via the HUB Student Center, which is accessible via MyUB. Information about HUB can be found at www.buffalo.edu/hub


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    ENG 391SEM - Crtive Writing Fict Worksh
    Lecture
    Crtive Writing Fict Worksh ANA Enrollment Information (not real time - data refreshed nightly)
    Class #:   14091   Enrollment Capacity:   21
    Section:   ANA   Enrollment Total:   5
    Credits:   3.00 credits   Seats Available:   16
    Dates:   01/29/2018 - 05/11/2018   Status:   OPEN
    Days, Time:   M , 7:00 PM - 9:40 PM
    Room:   Clemen 436 view map
    Location:   North Campus      
    Comments
    Registration for this course depends on student fulfilling the ENG 207 prerequisite OR by permission of instructor. Please contact instructor for details.
    Enrollment Requirements
    Prerequisites: Pre-requisite: ENG 207 or permission of instructor
      Course Description
    Writing workshop in which students submit original writing for peer review and weekly critical responses and read advanced representations of the genre. Designed to help students develop their style, hone their technique, and produce original fiction. What is the relationship of truth to fiction? How is reality created on the page? In what ways do fictional phenomena become credible in the stories in which they exist? How is the implausible made possible through fictional language? Under what conditions does a fiction support, resist, or transform the notion of story by which it is often circumscribed? Students will explore the relation of fictional worlds to the words that create them through assigned exercises, workshop submissions, and discussions of selected readings. This class has several objectives: first, to teach you how to attend to the fundamental craft elements of fiction (such as plot, character, voice, setting); second, to present you with an array of readings and exercises that will assist you in designing specific, individualized approaches to you own work; and last, to give you multiple opportunities to contextualize and showcase your skills within short and long fictions. Students in this class will try their hand at a wide range of techniques from the traditional to the avant -garde so that you can begin to situate your work and poetics. We will study methods of revision and invention so that you also become skilled editors of your own work. Writing fiction is a discipline: this course aims to help you hone your knowledge of how fiction is made. For example: Prof. D. Anastapoulos The course emphasizes the development of each student's style and invention process, as well as the practical and technical concerns of a fiction writer's craft. Students will be asked to locate a context for their fictions by situating their work among a community of other fiction writers and to envision how their stories intersect with different schools of fiction. Each writer will be expected to conceive each story within the scope of a larger fiction project as well as to revise extensively in order to explore the full range of the story's narrative themes. The workshop will blend a craft-centered approach with discussions on the form and theory of fiction. We will spend the first third of the semester reading published fictions andcompleting exercises designed to develop your skills at writing complex forms of narrative. In the second half of the semester, we will engage one anothers work in a traditional workshop format: each week we'll read two or three student manuscripts and critique them as a class; ideally, the student manuscripts will embrace the spirit, if not always the model, of assigned literature selections.
      Instructor(s)
                 Anastasopoulos, D J look up    
      On-line Resources
    Other Courses Taught By: Anastasopoulos, D J