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University at Buffalo

UB Undergraduate Academic Schedule: Spring 2019


  • This information is updated nightly. Additional information about this course, including real-time course data, prerequisite and corequisite information, is available to current students via the HUB Student Center, which is accessible via MyUB. Information about HUB can be found at www.buffalo.edu/hub


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    RSP 213LEC - World Religions
    Lecture
    World Religions DJT Enrollment Information (not real time - data refreshed nightly)
    Class #:   20687   Enrollment Capacity:   70
    Section:   DJT   Enrollment Total:   66
    Credits:   3.00 credits   Seats Available:   4
    Dates:   01/28/2019 - 05/10/2019   Status:   OPEN
    Days, Time:   T R , 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM
    Room:   Obrian 112 view map
    Location:   North Campus      
    Comments
    This course introduces the world's religious systems and their cultural bases, including Hinduism, Judaism, and Islam. In this course we will examine the expression of some primary characteristics of religion in primary sources from a variety of religious traditions. We will focus specifically on the ways in which ideas about the sacred are formed and how they are used to order experience, with a focus on space, time, and story. All of these, in turn, are part of imagining deity. We will then look at how these ordering concepts are used to formulate guidelines for daily life, as expressed in scripture, ritual, cosmogony, conceptions of the deity, and ethics. Any questions please contact the Department of Jewish Thought at jewish-thought@buffalo.edu
      Course Description
    This course introduces the world's religious systems and their cultural bases, including Hinduism, Judaism, and Islam. In this course we will examine the expression of some primary characteristics of religion in primary sources from a variety of religious traditions. We will focus specifically on the ways in which ideas about the sacred are formed and how they are used to order experience, with a focus on space, time, and story. All of these, in turn, are part of imagining deity. We will then look at how these ordering concepts are used to formulate guidelines for daily life, as expressed in scripture, ritual, cosmogony, conceptions of the deity, and ethics.
      Instructor(s)
                 Staff      
      On-line Resources