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University at Buffalo

UB Undergraduate Academic Schedule: Fall 2018


  • This information is updated nightly. Additional information about this course, including real-time course data, prerequisite and corequisite information, is available to current students via the HUB Student Center, which is accessible via MyUB. Information about HUB can be found at www.buffalo.edu/hub


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    DMS 220LEC - Machines, Codes And Cultures
    Lecture
    Machines, Codes And Cultures BOH Enrollment Information (not real time - data refreshed nightly)
    Class #:   20216   Enrollment Capacity:   200
    Section:   BOH   Enrollment Total:   199
    Credits:   4.00 credits   Seats Available:   1
    Dates:   08/27/2018 - 12/07/2018   Status:   OPEN WITH RESERVES
    Days, Time:   M W , 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM
    Room:   Cfa 112 view map
    Location:   North Campus      
    Reserve Capacities
    Description Enrollment Capacity Enrollment Total  
    Force Reg: Seats Reserved 4 0  
      Course Description
    This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to social media in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life today. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities. Topics will include the making of cities, numbering systems, inventions and automation, robots, interaction design, household appliances, software systems, social media and critical design. Students will be introduced to these concepts through primary source materials (texts and videos) and guided through them in weekly discussions. Grades will be based on a mid-semester position paper, a multiple choice final exam as well as participation in class discussions and a voluntary extra credit assignment. This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to social media in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life today. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities. Topics will include the making of cities, numbering systems, inventions and automation, robots, interaction design, household appliances, software systems, social media and critical design. Students will be introduced to these concepts through primary source materials (texts and videos) and guided through them in weekly discussions.
      Instructor(s)
                 Bohlen, M look up    
                 Pagan, A N look up    
                 Bast, J look up    
                 Pollard, J look up    
      On-line Resources
    Other Courses Taught By: Bohlen, M