University at Buffalo
UB Graduate Academic Schedule: Fall 2017

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    FR 526SEM - Special Topics-Special Topics:1968
    Lecture
    Special Topics-Special Topics:1968 JJT Enrollment Information (not real time - data refreshed nightly)
    Class #:   15997   Enrollment Capacity:   14
    Section:   JJT   Enrollment Total:   4
    Credits:   3.00 credits   Seats Available:   10
    Dates:   08/28/2017 - 12/08/2017   Status:   OPEN
    Days, Time:   T , 4:00 PM - 6:40 PM
    Room:   Clemen 902 view map
    Location:   North Campus      
    Comments
    May 68 (1960-2020) Fifty years later, May ?68 still inspires debate. Was it the historical moment when the generation of the 'baby boomers' finally reached the age of reason? Was it the time that a traditionally agrarian French society reached the end of its natural life and moved towards the Americanization of France and the spread of narrow-minded consumerism? Was it the birth of a new epistemology , the so-called 'La pensee 68' ? Or was it simply the guise of a sophomoric national animal house to obtain coed residences at Nanterre University in this new age of the 'pill' and otherwise global sexual revolution? It is the purpose of this seminar to look at the events of May ?68 and to consider it a moment with an extraordinary intellectual capital that will shape France during the second part of the 20th-century. Through the study of exemplary major theoretical texts of the period, new experimental narratives, the 'New Wave' film revolution and minimalist and art brut artistic movements of the late `60s, we will trace the archeology of the continental reflection and understand how many of the intellectual innovations established at that time are now natural components of our everyday life and common way of thinking.
      Course Description
    This is a three-credit course with variable content. Please check Department website for semester offerings, prerequisites, language of instruction, and other details.
      Instructor(s)
                 Thomas, J look up    
      On-line Resources
    Other Courses Taught By: Thomas, J