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UB Math Grads win NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

Out of eight NSF graduate fellowship winners from UB this year, three were math majors. Photo: Joe Cascio

The National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) named a record number of winners from UB this year, one more than all the awards given to students in the rest of the SUNY system. For the 2016 competition, NSF received close to 17,000 applications, and made 2,000 award offers.

Out of eight fellowship winners from UB this year, three were math majors:

Thomas Effland, graduate in applied mathematics program; currently a graduate student at Columbia University.
Goeffrey Fattin, double major in applied mathematics and physics.
Dante Iozzo, double major in mathematic and physics.

Two additional math majors who applied for NSF Fellowships , Michelle Karker and Matthew Morse, received honorable mentions.

About NSF GRFP

The NSF GRFP recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based Master's and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions.

The NSF GRFP helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions. 

As the oldest graduate fellowship of its kind, the GRFP has a long history of selecting recipients who achieve high levels of success in their future academic and professional careers. The reputation of the GRFP follows recipients and often helps them become life-long leaders that contribute significantly to both scientific innovation and teaching. Past fellows include numerous Nobel Prize winners, U.S. Secretary of Energy, Steven Chu, Google founder, Sergey Brin and Freakonomics co-author, Steven Levitt.

Fellows share in the prestige and opportunities that become available when they are selected. Fellows benefit from a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 along with a $12,000 cost of education allowance for tuition and fees (paid to the institution), opportunities for international research and professional development, and the freedom to conduct their own research at any accredited U.S. institution of graduate education they choose.

NSF Fellows are anticipated to become knowledge experts who can contribute significantly to research, teaching, and innovations in science and engineering. These individuals are crucial to maintaining and advancing the nation's technological infrastructure and national security as well as contributing to the economic well-being of society at large.

So that the nation can build fully upon the strength and creativity of a diverse society, the Foundation welcomes applications from all qualified individuals. Women, under-represented minorities and people with disabilities are encouraged to apply. The fellowship is competitive, and those planning to apply should devote a sincere effort to their application.