UB Curriculum Courses

Are you looking to take an interesting class but still want to meet your general education requirements? Then consider an Anthropology course! Below are the UB Curriuclum courses on offer from the Department of Anthropology for Fall 2018.

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Diversity Learning

APY 106: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Reg.#19933
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 1:00-1:50pm

Cultural anthropology is the comparative study of human lifeways, experiences, and beliefs.   It is often characterized as a discipline that makes the strange familiar and the familiar strange.  Anthropology seeks to understand how people attribute values and meanings to things and actions, and how these values and meanings motivate people’s actions in societies around the world, including our own.  The discipline’s distinguishing approach is characterized by long-term fieldwork, in which the researcher lives in the community he or she studies and learns – through participation, observation, and interviews – about the meanings of everyday life and activities.

APY 275: Culture, Health and Illness

Reg. #23566
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-1:50pm

People in all societies experience illness, but their understandings of the causes of disease and approaches for restoring health differ greatly. This course examines the social and cultural dimensions of health, illness, and healing. Through a variety of case studies, we will learn about the ways medical anthropologists study explanations of disease, experiences of suffering, and the social organization of health care.  Western medicine, also called “biomedicine,” will also be an object of our analysis. We will discuss how the delivery of biomedical health care involves particular understandings of the body and appropriate social relationships. Emphasis will also be placed on how the stories that individuals and institutions circulate about human agency in suffering shape people’s convictions about how to care, and for whom to care. The course aims to teach students to think about health, disease, and medicine in national, cross-cultural and global terms.

Pathways

APY 105: Introduction to Anthropology

UB Areas: Civilization and History, Humanities, Social Sciences

Reg.#19932
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00-10:50am

This class is a general introduction to the field of anthropology, the study of humanity. It is designed to pique your interest in the broad diversity of human behavior and lifestyles across the world and throughout time. This course will take a look at our four major subfields - archaeology, linguistic anthropology, physical anthropology, and cultural anthropology - and include discussions on our "youngest" subfield, applied anthropology. The goal of this class is to understand the wide range of issues covered by the fields of anthropology, the ways in which these issues are studied by specialists in the field, and the practical effects of the questions covered by anthropological study. In order to survey such a wide range of issues, the class is structured in a standard lecture format, with small group exercises and class discussions.

APY 106: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

UB Areas: Civilization and History, Humanities, Social Sciences

Reg.#19933
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 1:00-1:50pm

Cultural anthropology is the comparative study of human lifeways, experiences, and beliefs.   It is often characterized as a discipline that makes the strange familiar and the familiar strange.  Anthropology seeks to understand how people attribute values and meanings to things and actions, and how these values and meanings motivate people’s actions in societies around the world, including our own.  The discipline’s distinguishing approach is characterized by long-term fieldwork, in which the researcher lives in the community he or she studies and learns – through participation, observation, and interviews – about the meanings of everyday life and activities.

APY 107: Introduction to Physical Anthropology

UB Areas: Social Sciences

Reg. #19934
Tuesday/Thursday 3:30—4:50pm
Fillmore 355
Instructor Dr. Noreen von Cramon-Taubadel

For centuries preceding modern times, our uniqueness as a species was taken as a sign of special creation; we were not seen to be a part of nature. But as knowledge of human evolution, our closeness to other primates, and our adaptations to specific environments emerged, we have taken our place in the animal kingdom. Here, we learn how those insights developed, and about current methods of understanding human origins and the natural forces that have shaped us.

APY 108: Introduction to Archaeology

UB Areas: Social Sciences

Reg. #20917
Tuesday/Thursday 11:00am-12:20pm

Archaeology is the study of the human past through its material remains.  So much evidence of human activity on earth exists outside the realm of written records that archaeology is of primary importance in reconstructing past human life ways. Bridging the gap between the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities, archaeologists integrate many types of evidence in order to shed light on the origins of our species, Homo sapiens sapiens and development through time of so many different cultural manifestations.  Introduction to Archaeology provides an overview of the methods, theories and models used by archaeologists to better understand past human societies, from the formulation of a research question, through the processes of survey and excavation, to the analysis of data, and the interpretation of the results.  

APY 275: Culture, Health and Illness

UB Areas: Humanities, Social Sciences

Reg. #23566
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-1:50pm

People in all societies experience illness, but their understandings of the causes of disease and approaches for restoring health differ greatly. This course examines the social and cultural dimensions of health, illness, and healing. Through a variety of case studies, we will learn about the ways medical anthropologists study explanations of disease, experiences of suffering, and the social organization of health care.  Western medicine, also called “biomedicine,” will also be an object of our analysis. We will discuss how the delivery of biomedical health care involves particular understandings of the body and appropriate social relationships. Emphasis will also be placed on how the stories that individuals and institutions circulate about human agency in suffering shape people’s convictions about how to care, and for whom to care. The course aims to teach students to think about health, disease, and medicine in national, cross-cultural and global terms.

APY 326: Near East and Mideast Prehistory

UB Areas: Social Science

Reg. #20920
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 3:00--3:50pm

Archaeology of the prehistoric Near and Middle East from the peopling of the region through the emergence of the first villages and the domestication of plants and animals to the emergence of city-states in the 3rd millennium BC.

A century and a half of archaeological work in the Middle East has resulted in a wealth of evidence appropriate for tracing the prehistoric and historic traditions in this area of the world. This course offers an overview of the archaeology of the prehistoric and early historic Near and Middle East from the peopling of the region in the Palaeolithic through the emergence of city-states and imperial formations in the 3 millennium BC., paying close attention to the questions and debates that underpin research in various times and places. At the same time, no such narrative is independent of the interests and agendas of the scholars who have worked to compose it, and we will emphasize a critical approach to the questions and perspectives that have structured research in the region. The course will also include a brief introduction to the history and scope of archaeology and an overview of archaeological method and theory and of current movements and themes in archaeology.