UB Curriculum Courses

Are you looking to take an interesting class but still want to meet your general education requirements? Then consider an Anthropology course!

Below are the UB Curriuclum courses on offer from the Department of Anthropology during Fall 2019.

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Diversity Learning

APY 106: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Reg.# 19169
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 12:00-12:50pm

What is culture and how does it affect our understanding of the world and the ways we behave? How do cultural anthropologists approach the study of human societies and what methods do they use to do research? These are some of the questions that we will examine in this class. The course introduces students to ethnographic methods and theories of cultural anthropology. The aim is to enhance our knowledge of our own culture and of other cultures around the world. All majors are welcome.

Pathways

APY 105: Introduction to Anthropology

UB Areas: Civilization and History, Humanities, Social Sciences

Reg.# 19168
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00-10:50am

This class is a general introduction to the field of anthropology, the study of humanity. It is designed to pique your interest in the broad diversity of human behavior and lifestyles across the world and throughout time. This course will take a look at our four major subfields - archaeology, linguistic anthropology, physical anthropology, and cultural anthropology - and include discussions on our "youngest" subfield, applied anthropology. The goal of this class is to understand the wide range of issues covered by the fields of anthropology, the ways in which these issues are studied by specialists in the field, and the practical effects of the questions covered by anthropological study.

APY 106: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

UB Areas: Civilization and History, Humanities, Social Sciences

Reg.# 19169
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 12:00-12:50pm

What is culture and how does it affect our understanding of the world and the ways we behave? How do cultural anthropologists approach the study of human societies and what methods do they use to do research? These are some of the questions that we will examine in this class. The course introduces students to ethnographic methods and theories of cultural anthropology. The aim is to enhance our knowledge of our own culture and of other cultures around the world. All majors are welcome.

APY 107: Introduction to Physical Anthropology

UB Areas: Social Sciences

Reg. #19170
Tuesday/Thursday 3:30—4:50pm

For centuries preceding modern times, our uniqueness as a species was taken as a sign of special creation; we were not seen to be a part of nature. But as knowledge of human evolution, our closeness to other primates, and our adaptations to specific environments emerged, we have taken our place in the animal kingdom. Here, we learn how those insights developed, and about current methods of understanding human origins and the natural forces that have shaped us.

APY 108: Introduction to Archaeology

UB Areas: Social Sciences

Reg. #20000
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-1:50pm

Archaeology is the study of the human past through its material remains.  So much evidence of human activity on earth exists outside the realm of written records that archaeology is of primary importance in reconstructing past human life ways.  Bridging the gap between the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities, archaeologists integrate many types of evidence in order to shed light on the origins of our species, Homo sapiens sapiens and development through time of so many different cultural manifestations.  Introduction to Archaeology provides an overview of the methods, theories and models used by archaeologists to better understand past human societies, from the formulation of a research question, through the processes of survey and excavation, to the analysis of data, and the interpretation of the results.

UB Seminars

APY 199SEM - Contemporary Warfare

APY 199SEM-NEO
Reg. #19858
Tuesday/Thursday, 11:00am--12:20pm

This seminar explores war as a contemporary social and political issue, and the effects of war on social life. Questions we will examine include the following. Is war intrinsic to human nature? Does “culture” cause war”? How has the use of technology, especially drones and robots, altered the conduct of war? Why are women used as “weapons of war”? How do people in war-torn societies endure violence? The course will also explore debates about the so-called War on Terror and about recent attacks by ISIS and other militant groups. Our case studies will be drawn from many areas of the globe, including Rwanda, Iraq, Afghanistan, Colombia, Indonesia, and the United States.

APY 199SEM - Immigration Stories

APY 199SEM-RDA
Reg. #19859
Monday/Wednesday, 2:00-3:20pm

Why do people migrate? What is the difference between an immigrant and a refugee? What factors influence the ways in which individuals and families adjust to their lives in a new place? What is the difference between the experiences of first generation immigrants (those who moved) and their children and grandchildren? What is the role of borders (both social and geographical) in migration experiences? In this seminar, we will study these questions by looking at the stories migrants tell about their experiences. We will also look at the types of policies and programs in different countries and cities that are aimed at immigrants. Students will have the opportunity to develop research projects on immigration that involve collecting family migration stories. Students will learn ethnographic methods of observation, participation, and interviewing.