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UB Curriculum Courses

Are you looking to take an interesting class but still want to meet your general education requirements? Then consider an Anthropology course! Below are the UB Curriuclum courses on offer from the Department of Anthropology for Fall 2016.

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Diversity Learning

APY 106: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Reg.#21136
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00—10:50am
Baldy 101
Dr. Jaume Franquesa

What is culture and how does it affect our understanding of the world and the ways we behave? How do cultural anthropologists approach the study of human societies and what methods do they use to do research? These are some of the questions that we will examine in this class. The course introduces students to ethnographic methods and theories of cultural anthropology. The aim is to enhance our knowledge of our own culture and of other cultures around the world. All majors are welcome.

APY 323: Anthropology and Education

Reg. #23382
Monday/Wednesday 3:30—4:50pm
O’Brian 109
Dr. Deborah Reed-Danahay

This course takes a global perspective on human teaching and learning in a variety of cultural contexts. We explore ethnographic methods in educational research and anthropological approaches to education in its widest sense, both in and out of schools. Such forms of socialization as apprenticeship and initiation will be discussed alongside of the formal educational institutions of North American and European nations. This course will also address the educational issues facing immigrants and minority populations in contemporary societies. Readings and discussion will emphasize research and practice. We will work with various qualitative methods, including autoethnography, and will also explore depictions of teachers and students in both ethnographic and feature films. There are no prerequisites.

Pathways

APY 106: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Pathways: Cross-Cultural Exploration, Human Nature, Milestones in Western Culture
UB Areas: Civilization and History, Humanities, Social Sciences

Reg.#21136
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00—10:50am
Baldy 101
Dr. Jaume Franquesa

What is culture and how does it affect our understanding of the world and the ways we behave? How do cultural anthropologists approach the study of human societies and what methods do they use to do research? These are some of the questions that we will examine in this class. The course introduces students to ethnographic methods and theories of cultural anthropology. The aim is to enhance our knowledge of our own culture and of other cultures around the world. All majors are welcome.

APY 108: Introduction to Archaeology

Pathways: Place, Time and Space, Milestones in Western Culture
UB Areas: Social Sciences

Reg. #21028
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30—1:50pm
Cooke 121
Dr. Timothy Chevral

This course is designed to provide the student with a general introduction to the field of archaeology, including the methods and techniques that archaeologists use to identify and investigate archaeological sites. The course will focus on some of the key issues in archaeology, from human evolution and origins of agriculture, to the beginning of the modern age, including examples from the Old World and the New World. Students will learn how archaeologists use material culture to construct interpretations of human behavior in the past.

APY 393: Anthropology of Religion

Pathways: Religious Diversity
UB Areas: Social Sciences

Reg. #23751
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 1:00—1:50pm
Baldy 108
Dr. Phillips Stevens

Religion has existed in all cultures of the world, and at all stages of recorded history—indeed, it seems as old as humanity; and it is an extremely powerful motivator of behavior.  For these reasons alone its study is essential to anthropology.  This course considers religion as a dynamic system which can't be fully understood without reference to its interrelationships with other cultural systems, as well as to the biology of the human practitioner. Specific topics include: the nature of belief and the concept of "supernatural"; types of supernatural agencies; types of religious practitioners; theories of religion; myth; ritual; divination; sacrifice; totemism; taboo; magic and sorcery; witchcraft; shamanism; religious altered states of consciousness: spirit possession, ecstasy, and simple trance; supernaturally-caused illness and religious-based healing; religion in cultural change; new religions, cults, and “the occult” today; and others. The course will be illustrated throughout with films, slides, videos, religious objects, etc.