Graduate Courses

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Fall 2018 Course Offerings

APY 501SEM: Teaching and Research Resources

Reg. #21422
Arranged
Dr. Joyce Sirianni

Pedagogical aspects of instruction, including use of films, laboratories and field experience, bibliographic and archival materials, cross-cultural files and data banks.

APY 508SEM: Qualitative Research Methods

Reg. #20748
Thursday 3:30-6:10pm
Fillmore Academic Center 261
Dr. Ana Mariella Bacigalupo

This course will provide students with hands-on training in qualitative, ethnographic methods of research. Students will learn field techniques such as participant observation, interviewing, documentation, and use of media. Students will also learn how to design a research project, write a research proposal, and apply to the human subjects review board for project approval. The course will address research ethics, interpretation and representation of data, and the use of effective writing techniques. It will provide a critical evaluation of the nature of ethnographic research, including the rethinking of site, voice, and ethnographic authority. Students’ final projects can either be an ethnographic interview, an exercise in participant observation, or a research proposal in preparation for an MA or PhD project.

APY 512LEC: Kinship and Social Structure

Reg. #24691
Thursday 9:30am-12:10pm
Fillmore Academic Center 261 (Paley Library)
Dr. Frederick Klaits

In the words of the anthropologist Robert McKinley, “Kinship itself is a moral philosophy. It answers the question of how it is possible for one human being to be morally bound to another. The strength of a kinship system is based on its ability to draw people into this framework of mutual trust.”

Kinship contributes to the integration of social relations, face-to-face and sight unseen, in deep time and in the present. Yet kin relations may also be fraught with violence, ranging from sacrifice to murder; some would argue that kinship and racism are simply different dimensions of the same phenomenon. 

We will focus on the social processes of kinship, gender and sexuality through which people define, create, extend, limit, sever or transform their relatedness with others within and over generations in a range of political-economic contexts. We will explore:

  • how people conceptualize who is, or is not, their own “kin” or “kind” and why;
  • the moral imagination involved in working through the contradictory loyalties characterizing even the most intimate relations;
  • where, how, and why people draw the lines between themselves and other forms of organic life;
  • how generative, degenerative, and deadly relations are expressed in forms ranging from substances like blood, milk, semen or sap to new reproductive technologies and genetic genealogies;
  • and the significance of places – houses, land, cityscapes – in creating, shaping, containing, and transforming relationships over time.

APY 546SEM: Topics - Paleopathology

Reg. #23568
Tuesday 4:00-6:40pm
Spaulding 158
Dr. Joyce Sirianni

This seminar will address the topic of Human Paleopathology, i.e. the study of disease in ancient populations.  After a brief introduction to the history of paleopathology, and to what constitutes pathology vs. pseudopathology, students will learn the distinctive features of various infectious diseases which effect bone, skeletal trauma, and dental disease.

APY 550SEM: Evolution Colloquium

Reg. #15601
Tuesday 12:30-1:50
Cooke 435
Dr. Howard Lasker

During the Fall semester, this seminar discusses current topics in the fields of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior. Topics are usually briefly introduced by faculty, and students then lead discussions using classic and recent publications. Our overall theme for this semester focuses around “Explaining Diversity” from the perspectives of four different faculty members. Students are expected to read the assigned publications prior to discussion, post questions, and/or opposing evidence before the discussion through UBLearns, and engage in the discussion during class. Students are also expected to lead one of the discussions. The main goal of this semester is to develop the students’ capacity to observe, propose and defend opinions, in essence – be a participant in discovery and inquiry.

APY 593SEM: Topics - Policy Matters

Reg. #23565
Wednesday, 12:30-3:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Vasiliki Neofotistos

The basic premise of this course is that policy is a legitimate object of scholarly analysis. The course is thus concerned with the study of policy as a social, political, and cultural artifact and organizing principle of modern-day societies. We will investigate some of the underlying assumptions and beliefs that shape and guide policy formulation and debate. We will focus on issues at the heart of academic inquiry, such as power, institutions, discourse, and identity, and will explore policy issues and processes pertaining to cultural heritage, natural resources and the environment, health care, immigration and multiculturalism, development, and international conflict resolution and peace-making. We will also examine methodological, theoretical, and ethical considerations involved in studying policy.

APY 600TUT: MA/Thesis Guidance

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

Graduate students should register for their major professor’s section of this course when they are writing their MA Project/Thesis.

APY 601TUT: Individual Readings in Archaeology

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

If, after speaking to the Instructor and he/she agrees to work with you, the graduate student must fill out an Independent Study Form (form available outside the Anthropology Graduate Office), have the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies sign it then give it to Maria to put in your file which becomes part of your Application to Candidacy. Then the student may register for the appropriate number of credit hours.

APY 602TUT: Individual Readings in Cultural Anthropology

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

If, after speaking to the Instructor and he/she agrees to work with you, the graduate student must fill out an Independent Study Form (form available outside the Anthropology Graduate Office), have the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies sign it then give it to Maria to put in your file which becomes part of your Application to Candidacy. Then the student may register for the appropriate number of credit hours.

APY 607TUT: Individual Readings in Physical Anthropology

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

If, after speaking to the Instructor and he/she agrees to work with you, the graduate student must fill out an Independent Study Form (form available outside the Anthropology Graduate Office), have the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies sign it then give it to Maria to put in your file which becomes part of your Application to Candidacy. Then the student may register for the appropriate number of credit hours.

APY 614LEC: Hominin Behavior

Reg. #20252
Wednesday 3:00-5:40pm
158 Spaulding
Dr. Stephen Lycett

There can be few greater challenges to science than studying the behavior of a long‐dead animal. This is especially the case with studying hominin behavior. Yet, this challenge must be met if we are to understand our behavioral origins and heritage. Today, only one species of hominin exists: Homo sapiens.

An absence of closely related hominin taxa leaves us with a limited range of potential models that we might look to for inspiration. For instance, do chimpanzees provide clues or should we look to modern hunter‐gatherers? Does psychology provide an answer? Do we need to look to evolutionary theory? Can experiments be of assistance in a fundamentally historical science? With stone tools and the debris of their manufacture comprising much of our basic primary data, what hope is there for a rigorous science of hominin behavior? History shows that the field is subject to wild speculations. For instance, Neanderthals are sometimes portrayed as close brethren who would not evoke response if encountered on the New York subway (at least if dressed in a business suit, so the story goes). At other times they have been portrayed as fundamentally different in behavior and intelligence from our own species. Which is it?

This class is divided into two sections. The first section will provide an introduction to hominin evolution and the behavioral record, which will be useful for those new to the topic. Along the way some of the major questions will be encountered. The aim of this first section is to show something of what is at stake in terms of the importance of these issues for a full understanding of our own behavioral heritage; and yet, something of the frustration that accompanies this field will also be demonstrated. The second part of the class attempts to challenge students to arrive at conclusions about how a scientific response to these questions and frustrations may be developed. A series of possible responses are introduced, and you will be challenged to probe the strengths and weaknesses of these various approaches.

APY 651SEM: Graduate Survey of Physical Anthropology

Reg. #19367
Monday 12;30-3:10pm
158 Spaulding
Dr. Noreen von Cramon-Taubadel

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to the field of biological anthropology. Here we will review topics such as evolutionary theory, basic genetics, the evolution of the primates, human evolution, modern human diversity, the evolution of cognition and language, human social behavior, and the impacts of health and disease. The course will be taught via a mixture of lectures, class discussions and practical exercises.

APY 652LEC: Graduate Survey in Archaeology

Reg. #15251
Tuesday 10:00am-12:40pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Timothy Chevral

This course presents a systematic treatment of some important topics in Old World archaeology ranging from ca. 2.5 million years ago to ca. 2000 BC. It will also include an introduction to the history and scope of archaeology and an overview of archaeological method and theory and of current movements and themes in archaeology. Within a coherent theoretical framework, the course attempts to bring together a wide range of topics in Old World archaeology such as subsistence strategies of the earliest humans, transition to farming, origins and development of social complexity, urbanism and state formation.

APY 655LEC: Graduate Survey - Social & Cultural Anthropology I

Reg. #19948
Monday 4:00-6:40pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Deborah Reed-Danahay

This course is designed to give first year graduate students a basic grounding in "classic" social theory as it was developed in between the mid-19th and mid-20th centuries.  It is the first in a two-part survey of theory in socio-cultural anthropology.  The second half (APY654), taught in spring semester, covers subsequent developments. We will begin with Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and Mauss before moving on to anthropological works informed by a growing emphasis on ethnographic/participant-observation research. We will then turn to different schools of thought that developed in Europe and the United States in the first half of the twentieth century.  The influences of related disciplines such as history and sociology, as well as nationalism and colonialism, on the emergence of the discipline of anthropology will also be discussed. Our emphasis will be on the ways in which an understanding of foundational work in social theory may illuminate contemporary approaches to theory and method – both as continuations of and breaks with previous approaches.​

APY 700TUT: Dissertation Guidance

Variable Credit
Permission of Instructor

Graduate students should register for at least 1 credit hour of their major professor’s section of this every semester until the dissertation is complete when writing their PhD dissertation.

APY 730SEM: Advanced Problems in Areal Archaeology - Neolithic and Bronze Age

Reg. #15780
Wednesday 2:00-4:40pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Sarunas Milisauskas

This course will focus on problems of European Neolithic and Bronze Age.  We will review numerous topics such as the transition to farming in Europe, megalithic monuments, warfare, the origins of metallurgy, the rise of social hierarchies, Indo-European origins and Minoan and Mycenaean societies of the Aegean Bronze Age.

APY 733SEM: Topics - Analytical Methods in Archaeology

Reg. #23564
Monday 9:30am-12:10pm
261 Fillmore Academic Center (Paley Library)
Dr. Timothy Chevral

Specialized scientific techniques are becoming increasingly important to archaeology, yet many of these remain unknown to most archaeologists. This course examines in detail the assumptions and drawbacks of various chronometric dating techniques, how site formation processes are studied, how soils and sediments are interpreted by the archaeologist, how chemical analyses of soils are used to identify activity areas, how flora and fauna help us reconstruct paleoenvironments and paleodiets, and how land use strategies can be inferred from archaeological remains. The primary purpose of this course is to remove the mystery surrounding these techniques, and, particularly, to allow archaeologists to develop a critical understanding of the data given to them by scientific specialists. A secondary goal is to refresh knowledge of the archaeology of parts of the world that may be less known to participants. In order to meet both of these goals, readings for most topics are divided into two categories: method and applications. Illustrative applications are drawn from contemporary studies conducted in Mesoamerica, North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Middle East.