Photo by dIPENdAVE (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons; modified by Cynthia Stewart, 2015

Work in America’s Best Designed City

Architecture is Art!  Fredrick Law Olmsted described Buffalo as “the best planned city in America”. Buffalo is a showcase for generations of the world’s best architects:

Collage by Kevin Purdy from photos by Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

Great Architects have made Buffalo their playground

1/20/16
Henry Hobson Richardson was a prominent American architect who designed buildings in Albany, Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and other cities. He was well-recognized by his peers; of ten buildings named by American architects as the best in 1885, fully half were his. The style he popularized is named for him: Richardsonian Romanesque. Along with Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright, Richardson is one of "the recognized trinity of American architecture" all of whom build masterpieces in Buffalo.
1/20/16
Louise Bethune was very active both in advancing the stature of women in the architectural profession and in promoting the profession in general.  In 1885, she became the first woman member of the Western Association of Architects (WAA), a dynamic young group of practitioners that was pressing for professional standards and challenging the supremacy of the well-established American Institute of Architects (AIA).  Louise became the first woman member of the latter national profession association in 1888.  When the two groups merged in 1889 to form a new AIA, all WAA members became AIA Fellows, another first for Louise Bethune.  She was also a founder of the Buffalo Society of Architects in 1886, which became the local AIA chapter four years later.
1/20/16
Edward Durell Stone was a twentieth-century American architect and an early proponent of modern architecture in the United States. The Buffalo News Building was one of Stones last works. It was a time for Stone to reflect on his previous work and projects that he was influenced by but there was also the large task to fit it into the context of Buffalo’s rich architectural history.
1/20/16
When M&T had retained Yamaski, the Seattle-born architect of Japanese descent was 50 years old and already world-famous. Yamasaki distinguished himself in the late 1950s with sensuous, textile-like structures that rallied against the glass-box International Style of skyscraper architecture pervasive in the US at the time.
1/20/16
George Dietel, a native of Buffalo, was senior partner in the Buffalo architectural firm of Dietel & Wade, and John Wade was the chief architect who designed the Buffalo City Hall, a 32 story Art Deco building. Art Deco was at the height of its popularity in the late 1920's and early 1930's, when City Hall was conceived and built.
1/20/16
The Buffalo Central Terminal is a 17-story Art Deco style station designed by architects Fellheimer & Wagner and built in 1929 for the New York Central Railroad.
1/20/16
It would be hard to overestimate the impact Olmsted had on Buffalo and Western New York including the country's first and oldest coordinated system of public parks and parkways in Buffalo, New York; the country's oldest state park, the Niagara Reservation in Niagara Falls, New York; one of the first planned communities in the United States, the Parkside neighborhood of Buffalo.  Frederick Law Olmsted was an American landscape architect, journalist, social critic, and public administrator. He is popularly considered to be the father of American landscape architecture.
1/20/16
Wright was a leader of the Prairie School movement of architecture and developed the concept of the Usonian home, his unique vision for urban planning in the United States. Wright believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture.
1/20/16
Daniel Burnham was an American architect and city planner. In 1873, Burnham formed a partnership with John Wellborn Root. Three of their Chicago buildings were designated landmarks in 1962: The Rookery (1886) and the Reliance Building (1890), and the Monadnock Building (1891), the last and tallest (16-story) American Masonry skyscraper.
1/20/16
Louis Henry Sullivan has been called the "father of skyscrapers" and "father of modernism". Along with Henry Hobson Richardson and Frank Lloyd Wright, Sullivan is one of "the recognized trinity of American architecture" all of whom build masterpieces in Buffalo.
1/20/16
Gottlieb Eliel Saarinen was a Finnish architect known for his work with art deco buildings in the early years of the 20th century. His son, Eero Saarinen was a Finnish American architect famous for shaping his neofuturistic style according to the demands of the project: simple, sweeping, arching structural curves or machine-like rationalism.  The two collaborated on the design of Kleinhans Music Hall, home of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra.
1/20/16
Wright was a leader of the Prairie School movement of architecture and developed the concept of the Usonian home, his unique vision for urban planning in the United States. Wright believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture.
1/20/16
When M&T had retained Yamaski, the Seattle-born architect of Japanese descent was 50 years old and already world-famous. Yamasaki distinguished himself in the late 1950s with sensuous, textile-like structures that rallied against the glass-box International Style of skyscraper architecture pervasive in the US at the time.
1/20/16
Henry Hobson Richardson was a prominent American architect who designed buildings in Albany, Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and other cities. He was well-recognized by his peers; of ten buildings named by American architects as the best in 1885, fully half were his. The style he popularized is named for him: Richardsonian Romanesque. Along with Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright, Richardson is one of "the recognized trinity of American architecture" all of whom build masterpieces in Buffalo.
1/20/16
It would be hard to overestimate the impact Olmsted had on Buffalo and Western New York including the country's first and oldest coordinated system of public parks and parkways in Buffalo, New York; the country's oldest state park, the Niagara Reservation in Niagara Falls, New York; one of the first planned communities in the United States, the Parkside neighborhood of Buffalo.  Frederick Law Olmsted was an American landscape architect, journalist, social critic, and public administrator. He is popularly considered to be the father of American landscape architecture.
1/20/16
Louis Henry Sullivan has been called the "father of skyscrapers" and "father of modernism". Along with Henry Hobson Richardson and Frank Lloyd Wright, Sullivan is one of "the recognized trinity of American architecture" all of whom build masterpieces in Buffalo.
1/20/16
George Dietel, a native of Buffalo, was senior partner in the Buffalo architectural firm of Dietel & Wade, and John Wade was the chief architect who designed the Buffalo City Hall, a 32 story Art Deco building. Art Deco was at the height of its popularity in the late 1920's and early 1930's, when City Hall was conceived and built.
1/20/16
Edward Durell Stone was a twentieth-century American architect and an early proponent of modern architecture in the United States. The Buffalo News Building was one of Stones last works. It was a time for Stone to reflect on his previous work and projects that he was influenced by but there was also the large task to fit it into the context of Buffalo’s rich architectural history.
1/20/16
The Buffalo Central Terminal is a 17-story Art Deco style station designed by architects Fellheimer & Wagner and built in 1929 for the New York Central Railroad.
1/20/16
Daniel Burnham was an American architect and city planner. In 1873, Burnham formed a partnership with John Wellborn Root. Three of their Chicago buildings were designated landmarks in 1962: The Rookery (1886) and the Reliance Building (1890), and the Monadnock Building (1891), the last and tallest (16-story) American Masonry skyscraper.
1/20/16
Gottlieb Eliel Saarinen was a Finnish architect known for his work with art deco buildings in the early years of the 20th century. His son, Eero Saarinen was a Finnish American architect famous for shaping his neofuturistic style according to the demands of the project: simple, sweeping, arching structural curves or machine-like rationalism.  The two collaborated on the design of Kleinhans Music Hall, home of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra.
1/20/16
Louise Bethune was very active both in advancing the stature of women in the architectural profession and in promoting the profession in general.  In 1885, she became the first woman member of the Western Association of Architects (WAA), a dynamic young group of practitioners that was pressing for professional standards and challenging the supremacy of the well-established American Institute of Architects (AIA).  Louise became the first woman member of the latter national profession association in 1888.  When the two groups merged in 1889 to form a new AIA, all WAA members became AIA Fellows, another first for Louise Bethune.  She was also a founder of the Buffalo Society of Architects in 1886, which became the local AIA chapter four years later.